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Continuing Medical Education

 (CME)

Hot Topics from Stanford Medicine: Zika Update for Healthcare Professionals

Date: 
Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Course topic: 

Live Webinar! May 16, 2017 9-10am

Price: Free

STATEMENT OF NEED

This live CME Zika Update Webinar will focus on disease emergence and transmission routes of the Zika virus, emerging data from clinical research, and updated guidelines for Zika-exposed diagnosis and treatment.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • This is a national program, designed for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other healthcare providers practicing in:
    • Family Practice
    • Primary Care
    • Internal Medicine
    • Neurology
    • Pediatrics
    • OB/GYN
    • Infectious Disease

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • At the conclusion of this activity, learners will be able to:
    • Identify the transmission routes of the Zika virus and the reasons for disease emergence
    • Determine appropriate diagnostic testing/work-up and follow-up of Zika exposed neonates
    • Outline the basics of Zika prevention and consider the treatment options

COURSE DIRECTOR

  • Desiree LaBeaud, MD 
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

WEBINAR MODERATOR

  • Charles Prober, MD
    Senior Associate Dean, Medical Education and Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

WEBINAR SPEAKER

  • Desiree LaBeaud, MD
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

Managing Shoulder Pain in the Clinic: What to Look for and When to Intervene

Course topic: 

Course Description

This CME activity is a refresher on relevant functional musculoskeletal anatomy and physical exam techniques of the shoulder. Using case examples as well as didactics, animated visualizations, and video demonstrations, this course is designed to elevate the practicing physician’s confidence in understanding the current evidence base in managing routinely encountered conditions of the shoulder. Specific indications and timing for intervention and practices including various injection techniques are highlighted. In addition to providing a solid foundation in both physical exam and interventional skills, the curriculum is intended to introduce the physician to the role of ultrasound as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in assessing shoulder conditions.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for primary care physicians including family practice and internal medicine physicians, neurologists, rheumatologists, and emergency medicine physicians.

Dates, Duration and Fee

  • Release Date: October 2, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe relevant functional musculoskeletal anatomy and biomechanics as they relate to routinely encountered conditions of the shoulder.
  • Conduct a standardized physical examination to efficiently assess the shoulder and help generate an accurate differential diagnosis.
  • Identify indications for immediate, urgent, or early referral to the appropriate sub-specialist.
  • Formulate appropriate management strategies for various shoulder conditions based on current evidence, including the indications, timing and methods of performing targeted shoulder injections.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1. Introduction to Shoulder Anatomy and Pain
  3. Module 2. Comprehensive Physical Exam of Shoulder
  4. Module 3. Indications for Referrals
  5. Module 4. Conservative Management of Shoulder Pain
  6. Course Wrap-up
  7. Resources and References
  8. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Eugene Yousik Roh, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Speaker

Ninad Karandikar, MD
Assistant Professor (Affiliated) of Orthopedic Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
Medical Director, Regional Amputation and Transitional Rehabilitation Program
Veterans Administration, Palo Alto Health Care System
Course Director
Author/Speaker

Rebecca Dutton, MD
Chief Resident
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner
Author/Speaker

YT Chen, MD
Sports Medicine Fellow
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner
Reviewer

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Derek Yee
Role Play Actor
 

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser
  • You must have javascript enabled

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME Privacy Policy

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu.

Bibliography

Aly AR, Rajasekaran S, Ashworth N. Ultrasound-guided shoulder girdle injections are more accurate and more effective than landmark-guided injections: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med. 2015;49(16):1-42-1049.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Clinical practice guideline on optimizing the management of rotator cuff problems. Rosemont (IL): American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2010.

Comer GC, Liang E, Bishop JA. Lack of proficiency in musculoskeletal medicine among emergency medicine physicians. Journal of Orthop Trauma. 2014; 28(4): e85-e87

Day CS, Yeh AC, Franko O, Ramirez M, Krupat E. Musculoskeletal medicine: an assessment of the attitudes and knowledge of medical students at Harvard Medical School. Academic Medicine. 2007; 82(5): 452-457.

DiCaprio MR, Covey A, Bernstein J. Curricular requirements for musculoskeletal medicine in American medical schools. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 2003; 85-A(3): 565-567.

Dragoo JL, Braun HJ, Kim HJ, Phan HD, Golish SR. The in vitro chondrotoxicity of single-dose local anesthetics. Am J Sports Med. 2012 Apr;40(4):794-9.

Hermans J, Luime JJ, Meuffels DE, et al. Does this patient with shoulder pain have rotator cuff disease?: the Rational Clinical Examination systematic review. JAMA. 2013;310(8):837-847.

Karandikar O, Ortiz O. Kinetic chains: a review of the concept and its clinical applications. PM&R. 2011; 3(8): 739-745.

Lynch JR, Schmale GA, Schaad DC, Loepold SS. Important demographic variables impact the musculoskeletal knowledge and confidence of academic primary care physicians. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 2006; 88(7): 1589-1595.

Malanga GA, Nadler S. Musculoskeletal Physical Examination: An Evidence-Based Approach. Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences, 2006.

Matheney JM, Brinker MR, Elliott MN, Blake R, Rowane M. Confidence of graduating family practice residents in their management of musculoskeletal conditions. The American Journal of Orthopedics. 2000; 29(12): 945-952.

New Zealand Guidelines Group. The diagnosis and management of soft tissue shoulder injuries and related disorders. Wellington: ACC, July 2004.

Pedowitz RA, Yamaguchi K, Ahmad CS. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Optimizing the management of rotator cuff problems. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2011;19(6):368-79.

Piper SL, Kramer JD, Kim HT, Feeley BT. Effects of local anesthetics on articular cartilage. Am J Sports Med. 2011;39(10):2245-53.

Soh E, Li W, Ong KO, Chen W, Bautista D. Image-guided versus blind corticosteroid injections in adults with shoulder pain: a systematic review. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011 Jun 25;12:137.

Woolf AD, Pfledger B. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions. Bull World Health Organ. 2003; 81(9): 646-656.

Musculoskeletal Primer for the Non-Orthopedist

Course topic: 

Course Overview

This CME activity focuses on providing a biomechanical and anatomic framework for physicians to understand musculoskeletal medicine, providing a clinical paradigm and confidence that clinicians can apply to all musculoskeletal injury care, reducing referral needs, improving recovery timeframes, and reducing condition relapse potential. Interactive Case scenarios, video demonstrations of exam techniques, and computer modeling will augment the didactic material. Patient education tools will be accessible online for reference in an effort to foster further learning and patient independent recovery.

Musculoskeletal Primer for the Non-Orthopedist

Managing Atrial Fibrillation

Course topic: 

Course Overview

This CME online activity seeks to improve the ability and skills of the practicing physician and allied professional to manage atrial fibrilation with appropriate, effective, timely interventions and timely referrals. The online activity will discuss techniques to optimize outcomes of catheter ablation, device therapy, and medical therapy of patients with atrial fibrilation. The online activity will utilize animated videos, interactive case scenarios, and quizzes to optimize learning through interactive video role-play, expert interviews, and interactive activities.

Managing Atrial Fibrillation

HealthPro Advantage: Anti-Doping Education for the Health Professional

Date: 
Friday, July 22, 2016 to Saturday, July 22, 2017
Course topic: 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Physicians treating recreational and/or elite athletes that are governed by the World Anti-Doping Agency rules and regulations are also subject to anti-doping policies. Failure to adhere to these policies can result in anti-doping rule violations and sanctions for both the athlete and physician. This CME activity provides current anti-doping specific information for physicians and other health and medical professionals. Learners will engage in the educational activity via interactive text, animations, videos, and case-based studies.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians of all specialties, including Sports Medicine and Orthopedics, as well as all other health and medical professionals that may interact with athletes.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: July 22, 2016
  • Expiration Date: July 22, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.25 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.25
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the current changes to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List and utilize resources to check the status of medications for their inclusion on the current WADA Prohibited List.
  • Describe Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUE) and their submission process, and evaluate when it is appropriate to submit a TUE application.
  • Evaluate dietary supplement products that may pose an anti-doping risk and educate athletes about the risk involved with their use.
  • Counsel patients about the anti-doping sample collection process and the rights and responsibilities of the athlete and medical professionals.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Test your Knowledge
  3. Anti-Doping Roles and Responsibilities
  4. The WADA Prohibited List
  5. Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs)
  6. Dietary Supplements
  7. The Sample Collection Process
  8. Major Games Anti-Doping Specific Information
  9. Course Wrap-up
  10. Resources and References
  11. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Jason L. Dragoo, MD

Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Stanford University Medical Center

Head Team Physician, Stanford University Football Program

Course Director

Reviewer

Matthew Fedrouk, PhD

Science Director, United States Anti-Doping Agency

Co-Course Director

Speaker

Shikha Tandon, MSc

Science Program Lead, United States Anti-Doping Agency

Planner

Author

Amy Eichner, PhD

Special Advisor, United States Anti-Doping Agency

Author

C. Onye Ikwuakor, Esq.

Legal Affairs Director Emerging & Pro Sports

Author

Molly Tomlonovic, MS

Anti-Doping Operations & Education Director

Author

Anne Skinner, BA

Director of Communications

Author

In addition, voice overs for the video material in the course were performed by actors reading from a script.

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and United States Anti-Doping Agency. The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Mazanov J, Backhouse S, Connor J, Hemphill D, Quirk F. Athlete support personnel and anti-doping: Knowledge, attitudes, and ethical stance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. 2014; 24(5): 846–856.

Shikha T, Larry DB, Matthew NF. Treating the elite athlete: Anti-doping information for the health professional. Missouri Medicine. 2015; 112(2): 122-128.

DATA SHARING AUTHORIZATION

By clicking "Continue to registration", and then registering for the course, you expressly authorize Stanford to verify your participation in the course, "HealthPro Advantage: Anti-Doping Education For The Health Professional", with the course provider, USADA, via the secure transmission by Stanford to USADA of the following encrypted data: Your Name, Address, Email Address, Degree (e.g., PhD, RN), Specialty, Organization, Date of Completion, and Post-test Score. Expressly authorizing Stanford to verify your participation is the only way you can register for the course.

 

Healthpro Advantage

To Prescribe or Not To Prescribe? Antibiotics and Outpatient Infections

Course topic: 

Now live!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity provides a practical approach to the management of common outpatient infections by the primary care provider through the use of didactic videos, patient role plays and interactive case based video. National guidelines will be reviewed with emphasis on the most appropriate empiric antibiotic choice and duration of therapy. Video role plays will demonstrate communication skills that can be used with patients regarding appropriate antibiotic usage.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in family practice, primary care, internal medicine, ObGyn and pharmacists.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: TBD
  • Expiration Date: TBD
  • Estimated Time to Complete: TBD
  • CME/CPE Credits Offered: TBD
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME/CPE CREDITS

  • To Obtain CME Credits
  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the Post-test, Evaluation Survey, and Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Define the scope and implications of antibiotic misuse in the outpatient setting.
  • Recognize when antimicrobials are indicated in common outpatient infections.
  • Select the most appropriate empiric antimicrobial choice and duration of therapy for common outpatient bacterial infections.
  • Employ effective communication strategies when discussing antibiotic decisions with patients.
  • Define the scope and implications of antibiotic misuse in the outpatient setting.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Case 1. Sinus congestion
  3. Case 2. Bumps, lumps and pus
  4. Case 3. Red leg
  5. Case 4. Cough
  6. Case 5. Positive urine culture
  7. Case 6. Sore throat
  8. Case 7. Dysuria
  9. Course Wrap-up
  10. Resources and References
  11. Help!
Improving Antibiotic Use

E-Cigarettes: Harmful or Harm-Reducing? Online Medical Education in Electronic Nicotine Delivery Products

Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity focuses on the science of e-cigarettes – particularly health risks and benefits. Based on observed patterns in questions from real patients and answers from practicing physicians, we emphasize potential health impacts of e-cigarettes and regulated alternatives such as nicotine replacement therapy. Video role-playing opportunities focus on special issues related to youth, pregnancy, and use by parents and patients in perioperative phase, cancer treatment or cardiovascular disease treatment. Online learners are engaged through role-play, expert interviews, and interactive activities.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in cardiology, family practice, primary care, general surgery, internal medicine, oncology, pediatrics, psychiatry and others in Ob-Gyn.

  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Investigate new information about e-cigarette risks and benefits.
  • Evaluate the quality of e-cigarette information and interpret risks and benefits of e-cigarettes based on scientific evidence.
  • Develop informed professional opinions about when to warn against or recommend e-cigarettes.
  • Assess e-cigarette use in all patients who currently use tobacco.
  • Apply evidence-based brief tobacco/nicotine cessation counseling (5’As Ask-Advise-Assess-Assist-Arrange) protocol in instances where patients ask about e-cigarettes.
  • Counsel patients who are using or considering using e-cigarettes to attempt cessation with FDA-approved NRT or pharmacotherapy.
E-Cigarettes

Thinking Critically: Interpreting Randomized Clinical Trials

Date: 
Sunday, September 4, 2016 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course seeks to fulfill the clinical community’s need to improve skills in the critical evaluation of clinical research papers. Competency in critical appraisal skills can have a significant impact by improving clinical practice, quality of research projects, and peer-review of manuscripts and grants. The course will utilize efficient and engaging videos with relevant clinical examples to cover essential research methodology principles. The online format will provide opportunities for self-paced learning and practicing critical appraisal of a variety of published studies that evaluate benefit, harm, and prognosis.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for national and international physicians, medical researchers, residents, fellows, and allied health professionals in all specialties.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: September 4, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
    • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
    • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
    • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
    • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

*Participation in any content marked optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:
    • Analyze the concepts of randomization and blinding in reducing bias.
    • Develop strategies to critically appraise randomized clinical trials and determine if study results are valid.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Key Design Concepts
  3. Analyzing Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) Data
  4. Evaluating a Clinical Trial
  5. Course Wrap-up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

  • Steven Goodman, MD, PhD, MHS
    Professor of Medicine and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)
    Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Course Director
  • Rita Popat, MSPT, MS, PhD
    Clinical Associate Professor, 
    Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Co-Course Director
    Author/Presenter
  • Sarah Osmundson, MD
    Clinical Assistant Professor, 
    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Content Reviewer
  • Raymond Deng, MS
    Medical Student 
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Planner

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

  • Mike McAuliffe
    Stanford EdTech
  • Jim Neighbours
    SCCME
  • Greg Bruhns
    Stanford Online

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser
  • You must have javascript enabled

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Guyatt GH, Rennie D. Users' guides to the medical literature. JAMA. 1993;270:2096-2097.

Guyatt GH, Sackett DL, Cook DJ. Users' guides to the medical literature II. How to use an article about therapy or prevention. B. What were the results and will they help me in caring for my patients? Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group.JAMA. 1994;271:59-63.

Guyatt GH, Sackett DL, Cook DJ. Users' guides to the medical literature. II. How to use an article about therapy or prevention. A. Are the results of the study valid? Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA. 1993;270:2598-2601.

Oxman AD, Sackett DL, Guyatt GH. Users' guides to the medical literature. I. How to get started. The Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA. 1993;270:2093-2095.

Schulz KF, Altman DG, Moher D; CONSORT Group. CONSORT 2010 statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomized trials. Ann Intern Med. 2010; 152(11):726-32.

Thinking Critically

Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: Latino Populations

Date: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
Course topic: 

Now Open!

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Although dementia is the most common diagnosis in older adulthood it is under-recognized in primary care. This gap in recognition is even greater for patients, their caregivers and families who belong to various ethnic and racial minority populations. As U.S. residents are aging, and becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, physicians and other healthcare providers will increasingly need to tailor their care to specific populations.

This series of continuing education activities is designed to help healthcare providers recognize dementia, select culturally appropriate assessment tools, and communicate effectively about dementia care in ethnically and racially diverse populations. This course, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: Latino Populations, will provide information on assessing and caring for Dementia patients, their families, and caregivers in Latino/Hispanic American Populations.

The initial course in the series, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment, should be taken prior to other courses in the series as it addresses the diagnosis and treatment of Dementia, while this course addresses best practices, cultural information, and appropriate assessment tools for Latino/Hispanic American populations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in primary care, family practice, internal medicine and psychiatry specialties and nurses and social workers who work with older people.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 19, 2016
  • Expiration Date: May 19, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Select culturally appropriate dementia assessment tools for Latino/Hispanic American patients.
  • Utilize strategies to communicate effectively about dementia care with the families of patients with dementia from Latino/Hispanic American backgrounds.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1. Latino/Hispanic American Background
  3. Module 2. Measures and Assessments
  4. Module 3. Caregiving
  5. Course Wrap-Up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

DISCLOSURES

As the content of this CME activity is not related to the products or services of a commercial interest, the following planners and speaker have no relevant financial relationships to identify and no conflicts of interest to disclose:

Nancy Morioka-Douglas, MD, MPH
Clinical Professor, General Medicine Disciplines
Stanford University School of Medicine
Medical Director for Patient Centered Care in Primary Care, Stanford Health Care
Co-Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Course Director

Dolores Gallagher-Thompson, PhD 
Professor of Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Co-Course Director
Speaker

Nusha Askari, PhD 
Program Manager
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Kala Mehta, DSc, MPH
Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco
Program Evaluation Consultant, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Yuan Marian Tzuang, MSW 
Program Coordinator, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Planner

Annecy Majoros, BA
Research Assistant
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
Program Assistant
Department of Medicine/General Internal Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Consuelo Juarez, BA
Executive Director at Senior Talent Inc.
Planner

Irene Valverde, MFTI
Hartnell College
Planner

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Jim Neighbours
Stanford Center for CME

Jenny Xu
SGEC Instructional Designer

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alvarez, P., Rengifo, J., Emrani, T., & Gallagher-Thompson, D. (2013). Latino older adults and mental health: A review and commentary.Clinical Gerontologist, 37(1), 33-48. Published in the Special Issue on Late-Life Diversity.

Alzheimer’s Association. (2009). California Alzheimer’s Data Report. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from http://www.alz.org/CAdata/ .

Alzheimer's Association. (2015). 2015 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 11(3),  332-384.

Aranda, M.P. (2001). Racial and ethnic factors in dementia care-giving research in the US. Aging & Mental Health, 5(001), 116-123.

Beck, A.T. (1979). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. New York, NY: Penguin Books USA Inc.

Borson, S., Scanlan, J., Brush, M., Vitallano, P., & Dokmak, A. (2000).  The Mini-Cog: A cognitive ‘vital signs’ measure for dementia screening in multi-lingual elderly. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15(11), 1021-1027.

More bibliographic information can be found in the Resources and References section.

©2016 Stanford University School of Medicine

Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: Latino Populations

Introduction to Food and Health

Date: 
Monday, May 23, 2016 to Thursday, May 31, 2018
Course topic: 

Now Open!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

We find ourselves facing global epidemics of obesity and diabetes. To address these public health crises, we urgently need to explore innovative educational strategies for physicians and the general public. Physicians who eat a healthy, balanced diet and who understand what that entails, are more effective at counseling their patients to improve their health behaviors.

This CME activity provides a practical approach to supporting healthy eating for a variety of medical needs. Through the use of didactic videos, animated cases, and interactive activities course participants will gain proficiency in recommending well-established nutritional practices and assessing barriers to healthy eating for patients and physicians alike. By evaluating personal eating behaviors and barriers to healthy eating, physicians will emerge from the course better equipped to support sustainable positive change in their patients’ food choices while simultaneously having an opportunity to embark on optimizing their own nutritional health.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians in primary care, family practice, and internal medicine as well as nurse practitioners, physician assistants and allied health professionals involved in nutritional assessment and education of patients.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 23, 2016
  • Expiration Date: May 23, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2.5 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.50
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the fundamental principles of nutrition.
  • Conduct a motivational interview and nutritional assessment in a primary care setting using evidence-based techniques and tools.
  • Formulate a strategy based on a nutritional assessment to improve their health and their patients’ health.
  • Guide patients and themselves through iterative, targeted goals to improve nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Provide patients with skills-based learning resources to support their achievement of targeted nutrition goals.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Test Your Knowledge
  3. Module 1. The Rationale for Physicians
  4. Module 2. Food & Health
  5. Module 2. Talking to Patients
  6. Module 4. Communicating with your Patient about Food
  7. Module 5. Following Up with Patients
  8. Course Wrap-Up
  9. Resources and References
  10. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Maya Adam, MD
Lecturer
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Speaker

Tim Dang, BA
Teaching Assistant, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Jennifer Dietz, MA
Director of Evaluation, Student Affairs
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Michael Pollan, MA
James S. And John L. Knight Professor of Journalism
University of California, Berkeley, School of Journalism
Speaker

The following speaker indicated having relevant financial relationships with industry to disclose: 

David Eisenberg, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor of Nutrition, Dept. of Nutrition
T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Speaker
FareWell, Campus for Health (Japan), and CKK Health Products Group (China): Consulting

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Kim Walker, Ph.D.
IRT EdTech

William Bottini
IRT EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

ROLE PLAY ACTORS

Tracy A. Rydel, MD
Therese Truong, PA

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, et al. Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century. The American journal of clinical nutrition. 2005;81(2):341-354.

Willett WC, Dietz WH, Colditz GA. Guidelines for healthy weight. N Engl J Med 1999; 341: 427-434

World Health Organization. "Global Database on Body Mass Index." WHO :: Global Database on Body Mass Index. 2006. Accessed January 29, 2016, http://apps.who.int/bmi/index.jsp.

For a complete list, please view the References/Bibliography page in the Course.

©2016 Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford Introduction to Food and Health (CME)

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