Skip to content Skip to navigation

Continuing Medical Education

 (CME)

Date: 
Friday, May 1, 2015 to Monday, April 30, 2018
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Many physicians and medical researchers have not had a formal training in scientific writing and have not had mentors in their professional setting to assist them with improving this skill. Scientific writing is an important skill enabling effective disseminating of medical knowledge, clear communication and obtaining grant funding. This course seeks to improve skills in scientific writing as it applies to publishing clear and effective scientific papers and reviewing clinical research.

This course was repurposed from the original MOOC titled Writing in the Sciences that was given over several weeks. This course is self-paced and provides all material at the same time.

 

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of an international audience of physicians, residents and medical researchers in all specialties. 

 

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity
  • Complete the CME post-test, CME assessment survey, and attestation question at the end of the activity
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the 30-question post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

* Participation in the discussion forum and content marked optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Develop skills to write clear and interesting research papers that demonstrate the ability to: develop the abstract, introduction, content including methods and the results using good style and grace.
  • Develop strategies to apply principles of effective writing as it pertains to reviewing and publishing peer review papers.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 1, 2015
    Expiration Date: April 30, 2018
    Estimated Time to Complete: 20 Hours
    CME Credits Offered: 20.00
    Registration Fee: $20

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Charles Prober, MD
Senior Associate Dean, Medical Education
Stanford School of Medicine
Course Director

Kristin Sainani, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Health Research and Policy
Co-Course Director
Author/Presenter

The following presenters have no relationships with industry relative to the content of this activity:

Eran Bendavid, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Stanford University

Kit Delgado, MD
Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Stanford University

Bradley Efron, MD
Professor of Statistics and of Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

Gary Friedman, MD
Consulting Professor in Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

George Lundberg, MD
Consulting Professor in Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

Crystal Smith-Spangler, MD
Instructor of Medicine,
Stanford University

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe 
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox, or Safari browser. You must have JavaScript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 20.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY BILL 1195 – CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

 

Writing in the Sciences

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 24, 2013 to Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Course topic: 

Course closed. Completed 6/24/2015

The course will fill the gap between didactic learning and clinical application in developing an interactive course that offers an opportunity to learn and apply surgical decision making skills for practicing surgeons in treating acute and sub-acute surgical conditions and complications.

Learning Objectives

  • Apply safe surgical decision making skills through clinical practice when treating surgical conditions.
  • Develop skills to become discerning and efficient in the use of diagnostic tests in the approach to treating surgical diseases or problems.
  • Develop skills to improve triage and addressing multiple patient problems at once in a given time frame.
  • Develop skills to recognize and consistently treat acute cholecystitis by performing urgent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
  • Develop skills to recognize and consistently treat acute appendicitis by performing laparoscopic appendectomy.

Intended Audience

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of a national audience of practicing general surgeons.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Course topic: 

TEACHING BASIC BEDSIDE TRANSTHORACIC ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY AND ULTRASONOGRAPHY EXAMINATION TO EVALUATE HYPOTENSION AND HYPOXEMIA

Frequently, healthcare professionals are required to handle medical emergencies and manage hemodynamically unstable patients. Recently, new tools and technologies have become available to enhance diagnosis and management of these patients. Small, relatively inexpensive hand-carried cardiac ultrasound (HCU) devices have become available in the inpatient and outpatient settings. Because they are relatively easy to use and portable, HCU's have made powerful echocardiographic diagnostic data available to physicians. Yet, many of today's practicing physicians lack formal training or a thorough understanding of the basic principles of operation of these devices and the diagnostic benefits they offer. This course will provide an evidence-based overview of the use of HCU's at the clinic and the bedside using video based didactics and demonstrations.

This online curriculum is not a replacement for Level 1 or Level 2 training recommendations by the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and American College of Cardiology (ACC), which require personally performing and interpreting echo examinations.

However, the curriculum is a didactic and interactive introduction to the topic, designed to motivate practicing physicians to pursue hands-on training to achieve Level 1 or Level 2 ASE HCU training through further study and practice.

In addition to providing an overview and foundational knowledge about the use of HCU’s in the clinical setting, the curriculum is designed to provide an educational roadmap to further training opportunities and courses that will allow practicing physicians to become independently competent in the use of HCU’s to complement their clinical examination and improve their diagnostic skills.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians with the following specialties: cardiology, family practice, primary care, general surgery, internal medicine, critical care, pulmonology, and emergency medicine.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Original Release Date: August 29, 2013
  • Latest Review Date: August 12, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.5 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.50
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Develop skills to personally use HCU devices and interpret echo examinations such as identifying cardiac and pulmonary anatomy from HCU exam images and performing a basic HCU exam of the heart and lungs.
  • Develop skills to use HCU devices to diagnose and confirm appropriate therapeutic treatment of pneumothorax.
  • Develop skills to use HCU devices to assess hypoxemia, hypovolemia, and hypotension.
  • Develop skills to use HCU devices to assess presence of cardiac tamponade.
  • Develop skills to use HCU devices to assess ventricular function during CPR.

 

 

TTE Basics

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Course topic: 

Course coming soon! If you would like to be notified of course launch please fill out the CME interest form:
https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_b91N3tkQBmouiUZ

Sponsored by
Stanford University School of Medicine 

Presented by
The Department of Surgery, Division of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine

Intended Audience
This course is designed to meet the educational needs of a international audience of physicians, physician assistance and nurse practitioners who specialize in family practice, primary care, general surgery, internal medicine, critical care and emergency medicine.

Course Description

The American Medical Association has recognized the utility of ultrasound; it recommends training and education standards that are developed by each physician’s respective specialty. It has been proven that bedside ultrasound allows the treating physician to more quickly determine the cause of urgent conditions and life-threatening illness and help in guiding resuscitative efforts for patients in shock. If invasive procedures must be performed, they can be done under ultrasound guidance (instead of using blind landmark techniques), decreasing the risk of complications. This has been recommended by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as a key intervention. Emergency Medicine was an early adopter of bedside focused ultrasound due to the need for rapid evaluation of critically ill patients and patients in acute pain. Now, other specialty organizations, including critical care, surgery, internal medicine, ob-gyn, and pediatrics are starting to include ultrasound during residency training. However, many currently practicing physicians were trained before ultrasound training was available or realized its utility in their practice. This course will provide strategies on how to use bedside focused ultrasound, image interpretation, and integrate it in the clinical practice.

Learning Objectives

  • Develop skills to screen for and diagnose emergent conditions such as:

- tamponade, 

-abdominal aortic aneurysm, 

-pneumothorax, 

-shock, 

-ruptured ectopic pregnancy, 

-intraperitoneal hemorrhage, 

-acute hydronephrosis, 

-cholecystitis, 

-acute heart strain/failure 

-cellulitis, 

-abscess, 

-DVT, 

-pulmonary edema, 

-pleural effusion, 

-retinal detachment, 

-orbital rupture, 

-increased intracranial pressure 

and associated symptoms such as:

- abdominal pain, 

-hematuria, 

-chest pain, 

-shortness of breath, 

-leg edema, 

-skin redness, 

-vision loss, 

-back pain, 

-pelvic pain, 

-vaginal bleeding,

- altered mental status and 

-headache.

  • Develop skills and integrate them in clinical practice for ultrasound guided high risk procedures such as:

- central lines placement, 

-thoracentesis, 

-paracentesis, 

-peripheral lines, 

-lumbar puncture, 

-arthrocentesis, 

-pericardiocentesis, 

-abscess drainage, 

-foreign body removal

 


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, November 2, 2015
Course topic: 

This course is closed.

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the American Academy of Pain Medicine

Course Description

This course aims to improve knowledge, competence and performance in prescribing opioids in the treatment of chronic pain. Specifically, it will increase knowledge of the significant potential for abuse of opioid analgesics and knowledge of the emerging opioid formulations and combinations with the goal to decrease the risks of diversion and abuse. This course will focus on the assessment and recognition of psychological co-morbidities that increase the risk for opioid abuse and diversion, developing treatment plans and implementing interventions aimed at decreasing risk for unintentional misuse in addition to abuse of and addiction to opioid analgesics.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for a national and international audience of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants in all clinical specialties.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: November 2, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 4.5 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 4.50
  • Registration fee: Free

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

*Participation in any content marked optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Determine the general characteristics, toxicities and drug interactions associated with opioids and incorporate this knowledge in practice.
  • Utilize various opioid risk assessment tools to reduce the risk of opioid misuse and to ensure patient safety.
  • Evaluate and interpret functional improvement, urine drug testing, and data from prescription drug monitoring systems.
  • Develop and implement strategies for termination of opioid therapy and perform the required steps for proper documentation and referral.
  • Integrate counseling of patients/caregivers on the safe use of opioids into practice.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 
2. Risk Assessment and Substance Abuse Disorders
3. Initiation, Modification, and Discontinuation of Opioid Therapy
4. Managing Therapy with Opioids 
5. Course Wrap-up 
6. Optional Content: Opioid Prescribing Tools 
7. Resources and References
8. Help!

Disclosures

The following planner indicated having relevant relationship(s) with industry to disclose:

Lynn Webster, MD
Vice President, Scientific Affairs
PRA Health Sciences
Raleigh, NC
Planner

Dr. Webster has indicated that he is on the advisory boards of AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca, Charleston Labs, Collegium Pharmaceuticals, Covidien Mallinckrodt, Egalet, Inspirion Pharmaceuticals, Insys Therapeutics, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Kaleo, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Medtronic, Nektar Therapeutics, Orexo Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer Inc., Proove Biosciences, Salix Pharmaceuticals, Signature Therapeutics, Teva Pharmaceuticals, and Trevena; serves as a consultant to Acura Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca, BioDelivery Sciences International (BDSI), Covidien Mallinckrodt, CVS Caremark, Grunenthal USA, Insys Therapeutics, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Mallinckrodt, Medtronic, Nektar Therapeutics, Neura Therapeutik, Nevro Corp., Proove Biosciences, Salix Pharmaceuticals, Shionogi, and Zogenix; has received honoraria from AstraZeneca, Covidien Mallinckrodt, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Medtronic, Nektar Therapeutics, and Salix Pharmaceuticals; has received travel expenses from Cara Therapeutics, Charleston Labs, Collegium Pharmaceuticals, Grunenthal USA, Insys Therapeutics, Kaleo, Mallinckrodt, Nevro Corp., Orexo Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer Inc., Proove Biosciences, QRx Pharma, TEVA, Trevena and Zogenix; and has been employed by CRI Lifetree and PRA Health Sciences.

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Sean Mackey, MD, PhD
Redlich Professor and Professor of Neurology
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Stanford University Medical Center
Course Director

Sam Lahidji, MD 
Adjunct Clinical Instructor 
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Chief, Pain Management
Kaiser Permanete, East Bay
Co-Course Director
Author/Presenter

Gabriel Schonwald, MD 
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor 
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner 
Author/Presenter

Jordan Newmark, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine 
Associate Fellowship Director, Pain Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner 
Author/Presenter

Ming-Chih J Kao, MD, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Orthopaedic Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Technical Design and Development

Ian Mackey
Video Editing, Recording

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 4.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

The Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane .stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Resources and References

Model Policy for the Use of Controlled Substances for the Treatment of Pain Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States, Inc.http://www.fsmb.org/Media/Default/PDF/FSMB/Advocacy/pain_policy_july2013.pdf

VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Opioid Therapy for Chronic Painhttp://www.healthquality.va.gov/Chronic_Opioid_Therapy_COT.asp

American Pain Society/American Academy of Pain Medicine Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy in Chronic Noncancer Pain http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(08)00831-6/fulltext

For a complete list, go to Resources and References page in the Courseware tab above.

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

Safe Opioid Prescription

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 to Monday, August 19, 2019
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course seeks to fulfill the need in the clinical community to better understand medical statistics as it pertains to practicing evidence based medicine, communicating treatment outcome probability to patients and interpreting the results of studies and scientific papers, and in turn improving quality of patient care. This applies to all specialties in various settings of practice.

INTENDED AUDIENCE:

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of an international audience of physicians, residents and medical researchers in all specialties.

INTERNET ENDURING MATERIAL SPONSORED BY:

Stanford University School of Medicine

PRESENTED BY:

The Stanford University School of Medicine Medical Education and Health Research and Policy Departments

DATES & CONTENT INFO:

  • This material was repurposed from the original MOOC that was given over several weeks. This course is self-paced and provides all material at the same time.
  • Release Date: Sept 23, 2014
  • Expiration Date: Sept 22, 2016
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 23.5 Hours
  • Registration Fee: $25

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Develop strategies to enable translation of medical research into practicing evidence-based medicine through the following statistical methods: understanding bias, random variation, correctly interpret P values, basic probability and conditional probability, spot statistical errors, understand correlated data.
  • Develop strategies to use specific statistical tests, understand basic regression modeling, and Bayesian inference.
  • Develop strategies to effectively communicate prognosis and treatment probabilities to patients.
  • Develop strategies to enable consistent interpretation of research data and provide correct information on study results.

DISCLOSURES:

The following planners, speakers, authors and reviewers have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Charles Prober, MD
Senior Associate Dean, Medical Education
Stanford School of Medicine
Course Director

Kristin Sainani, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Health Research and Policy
Stanford School of Medicine
Co-Course Director and Presenter

Reviewers:

Irina Tokareva, RN, BSN, MAS
Curriculum and Outcomes Manager
Stanford Center for Continuing Medical Education

Linda G. Baer, MSPH, CCMEP
Director, CME
Stanford Center for Continuing Medical Education

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

This course requires the use of the current version of either Chrome or Firefox. You must have javascript enabled.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

For further information regarding the content, CME credit or if you experience any technical difficulties with this enduring material please send an email to stanfordcme@stanford.edu.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS:

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 23.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

The Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 – Cultural and Linguistic Competency
California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal:
http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

SCCME PRIVACY POLICY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

http://cme.stanford.edu/policies/privacy.html

TERMS OF USE

http://www.stanford.edu/site/terms.html

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  1. Physician Numeracy: Essential Skills for Practicing Evidence-based Medicine. Goutham Rao, MD, Fam Med 2008;40(5):354-8
  2. How can good randomized controlled trials in leading journals be so misinterpreted? Frank J. Veith, MD, J Vasc Surg 2013;57:3S-7S.
  3. Numeracy and Medicine: Key Family Physician Attitudes about Communicating Probability with Patients. Robert Gramling, MD, Jennifer E. Irvin, PhD, Justin Nash, PhD, Christopher Sciamanna, MD, MPH and Larry Culpepper, MD, MPH. J Am Board Fam Med November 1, 2004 vol. 17 no 6.
  4. Practical and statistical issues in missing data for longitudinal patient reported outcomes. Melanie L Bell and Diane L Fairclough. Stat Methods Med Res published online 19 February 2013
  5. Evaluating Mastery of Biostatistics for Medical Researchers: Need for a New Assessment Tool. Felicity Enders. Clin Trans Sci 2011; Volume 4: 448–454
Statistics in Medicine Course Image

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Course topic: 

Course coming soon! If you would like to be notified of course launch please fill out the CME interest form:
https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_b91N3tkQBmouiUZ

Sponsored by
Stanford University School of Medicine 

Presented by
The Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and Clinical Effectiveness Department at Stanford Hospital and Clinics

Intended Audience
This course is designed to meet the educational needs of a international audience of physicians and allied health professionals in all clinical specialties.

Course Description

This activity aims to improve the practicing physicians’ and other health care providers’ knowledge about the types of medical errors that can occur and different methods of mitigating and/or preventing these events from occurring utilizing The Joint Commission guidelines and standards pertaining to the National Patient Safety Goals (NPSG). The activity is a web-enabled, interactive program that permits the participant to work on medical events by investigating and analyzing root causes and/or contributing factors to comprehend how medical errors can occur. These are the skills that can be utilized on a daily basis by healthcare providers to ensure safe patient care. 

Learning Objectives

  • Integrate NPSG requirements in clinical practice in the areas of patient identification, Universal Protocol, labeling and medication reconciliation.
  • Develop practical skills to improve team communication and apply these skills when medical errors occur and to prevent medical errors in the future, i.e. immediate feedback, Team STEPPS.
  • Evaluate root causes and contributing factors that lead to various medical errors.
  • Develop skill to apply in practice the appropriate procedures or steps to assure that such events are prevented in the future.

 

 


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Overview

This course will offer a practical approach to prescribing antibiotic therapy and development of antimicrobial stewardship across all specialties and settings. 

Antibiotics are among the most frequently prescribed classes of drugs and it is estimated that approximately 50% of antibiotic use, in both the outpatient and inpatient settings, is inappropriate.  At the same time, in contrast to any other class of drugs, every antibiotic use has a potential public health consequence – inappropriate use may not harm only the individual patient, but contributes to societal harm by exerting an unnecessary selective pressure that may lead to antibiotic resistance among bacteria.  This course will offer a number of illustrative cases, recognizable to the practicing physician in his or her practice to engage the learners in the thought processes that lead to optimal decision making, improved outcomes of individual patients, and harm reduction vis-a-vis the bacterial ecology. 
 

Learning Objectives

  • Develop skills to apply IDSA guidelines in treating infections such as acute rhino-sinusitis, and acute bronchitis. 
  • Apply evidence based antibiotic management to treat sepsis. 
  • Implement principles of antimicrobial stewardship in your practice. 
The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

Course Syllabus

Course Outline:

  • Introduction and Pre-course Assessment
  • Unit 1: Mechanisms of Microbial Resistance
  • Unit 2: Appropriate Pharmacotherapy
  • Unit 3: ASP in Special Settings 
  • Unit 4: Components of an Effective ASP 
  • Unit 5: Implementing an Effective ASP
  • Unit 6: Beyond Culture and Sensitivity: the future of ASP, Microbiology and Infection Control

Course Format

Videos by leading experts in the field will provide up to date scientific information and case studies will engage learners in the educational process. Quizzes will facilitate better integration of the information into strategies to apply in practice. 

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, October 16, 2015 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Practical Tips to Improve Asian American Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Stanford Cancer Institute at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

Racial and ethnic diversity is critical to the success of cancer clinical trials. Asian Americans, like other ethnic groups, have low recruitment, accrual and retention rates in cancer clinical trials. This represents a significant challenge on a national level for health advocates, healthcare institutions and the National Cancer Institute. To improve communication and awareness of clinical trials for Asian American patients, it is important to increase learners’ knowledge about cancer clinical trials and cultural humility. This online course will educate healthcare providers and allied health professionals about cancer clinical trials and cultural humility skills as well as provide educational resources and tips for reinforcing change in practice to improve outcomes in Asian American clinical trial participation.

Intended Audience

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of a national audience of physicians and allied health professionals who specialize in family practice, primary care, internal medicine and oncology.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Original Release Date: August 29, 2013
  • Latest Review Date: October 16, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 29, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the CME post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Develop strategies to determine appropriate patients for clinical trials.
  • Apply cultural humility skills to effectively communicate with Asian American patients about cancer clinical trials.
  • Identify at least 5 ways that will reinforce change in practice to incorporate clinical trials education and referral among Asian American patients and apply it in practice.
  • Recognize how to access at least 5 cancer clinical trial resources and use them in education and referral.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Clinical Trials Basics (13:51)
  3. Cultural Competence, Cultural Humility, & Clinical Trials Recruitment (14:20)
  4. Changing Your Practice to Increase Asian American Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials (12:45)
  5. Course Wrap-up
  6. References and Resources
  7. Help!

Disclosures

The following planner and speaker indicated that he has relevant financial relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

George A. Fisher Jr., MD, PhD
Professor of Oncology
Faculty Director, Stanford Cancer Clinical Trials Office
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Co-Course Director
Speaker
Contracted Research for clinical trials with Genentech, Novartis, Bristol, Ipsen, Tercica, Gilead and Newlink

The following planners, speakers and reviewer have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Kim F. Rhoads, MD, MS, MPH, FACS
Assistant Professor, Surgery
Director, Community Partnership Program, Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Course Director
Reviewer

Angela Sun, PhD, MPH
Founder & President, Asian Alliance for Health, Inc.
National Outreach Core Director, AANCART
Co-Course Director

Miriam Bischoff, MS, MBA
Executive Administrative Director, Clinical Research, Stanford Cancer Institute
Planner

Rachel J. Mesia, MPH
Program Coordinator, Stanford Cancer Institute
Planner

Joyce Cheng, MS
Program Manager, Asian Alliance for Health
Outreach Core Community Director-San Francisco, AANCART
Planner

Charlene Cuaresma, MPH
Outreach Core Community Director-Hawaii, AANCART
Planner

Julie Dang, MPH, CHES
Admin Core Director and Community Health Educator, AANCART
Planner

May Louie Sung, MPH
Outreach Core Co-Director, AANCART
Planner

Jamie Felicitas, BS
Web Tool Project Manager, APICEM
AANCART
Planner

Duong Ton, BA
Sr. Community Health Program Representative, AANCART
Planner

Parichart Sabado, MPH
Outreach Core Community Director, Los Angeles AANCART
Planner

Tina Tran Fung, MPH
Community Advisory Group Member, AANCART
Planner

Penny Lo, BS
Outreach Core Community Director-Sacramento, AANCART
Planner

Thoa Nguyen
Community Advisory Group Member (Ex-Officio), AANCART
Planner

Jann Murray-Garcia, MD, MPH
Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, University of California, Davis
Speaker

Tung Nguyen , MD
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco
Speaker

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

The Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Bibliography

Chen A. The legal framework for language access in healthcare settings: Title VI and beyond. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2007:22(2): 62-367.

Epner DE, Baile WF. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence. Annals of Oncology. 2012;23(suppl 3):33-42.

Kummar S, Rubinstein L, Kinders R, Parchment RE, Gutierrez ME, Murgo AJ, et al. Phase 0 clinical trials: conceptions and misconceptions. The Cancer Journal. 2008;14(3):133-137.

Lara PN, Paterniti DA, Chiechi C, Turrell C, Morain C, Horan N, et al. Evaluation of factors affecting awareness of and willingness to participate in cancer clinical trials. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2005;23(36):9282-9289.

Okines AF, Cunningham D. Trastuzumab in gastric cancer. European Journal of Cancer. 2010;46(11):1949-1959.

Symonds RP, Lord K, Mitchell AJ, Raghavan D. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines. British Journal of Cancer. 2012;107(7):1017-1021.

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

 

FAQ: 

FAQ

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment after completing this class?

Yes. Students who successfully complete the class (comprise of 3 module videos, post-course quiz, post-course survey) will receive a Statement of Accomplishment.

What resources will I need for this class?

You will need a reasonably reliable Internet connection to access course videos, quiz, survey and handout. Please note that while most features of the Coursera site will load and function on a mobile device (such as a smartphone or a tablet), Coursera does not officially support these devices and cannot guarantee full site functionality if you are accessing Coursera from a mobile device.

System Requirements
You will need a reasonably reliable Internet connection to access course resources and to watch (or download) lecture videos. Please note that while most features of the Coursera site will load and function on a mobile device (such as a smartphone or a tablet), Coursera does not officially support these devices and cannot guarantee full site functionality if you are accessing Coursera from a mobile device. More information available via Coursera’s help page.

Clinical Trials Course Image

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Continuing Medical Education