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Continuing Studies

Online Certificate in Novel Writing

Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017
Course topic: 

The Online Writing Program at Stanford Continuing Studies, which offers dynamic courses in every genre, also hosts the Certificate Program in Novel Writing. The Certificate Program builds on the success and excellent teaching of our regular online writing courses with the goal of providing a structured environment in which you can write your novel.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply

Have you always wanted to write a book? The Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing is designed to help you fulfill that dream.

About the Course

We’ve created a seven-course program that will show you the path from first glimmer to full manuscript. You’ll start with the habit of the art, move through a series of targeted workshops, produce a book-length manuscript (or at least a good part of one), and review that manuscript in a one-on-one tutorial with an accomplished fiction writer. Our instructors are all accomplished authors, mostly drawn from Stanford’s prestigious Stegner Fellows.

Because the Certificate Program relies on a dedicated, dynamic cohort, admission is by application only. By studying and writing with a consistent group of students with similar commitment to their work, you’ll achieve a deeper sense of connection and thus a deeper level of learning. You’ll be involved in the creation and construction of many narratives – most notably your own.

Best of all, the Certificate Program retains all the flexibility of our regular online writing courses. You can access your class from home or on your travels, at the times of day that suit your schedule.

By the time you complete your Certificate, you will be well on your way to writing a book-length manuscript. Will it be finished and revised? That’s up to you. But along the way, your work will be read, critiqued, and supported by dedicated instructors who are also serious practitioners in your field.

Ready to apply? Applications are now being accepted for students starting in Fall 2017. The application deadline is Friday, June 2 at 5:00 pm (PDT).

The Art of Designing and Delivering Engaging Presentations

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

Course Description: 

Presentations are ubiquitous. From board rooms to chat rooms, we all need to present our ideas and ourselves frequently. Estimates suggest that there are 40 million presentations a day in the United States. Yet many presenters feel uneasy about speaking in front of others. Additionally, speakers can struggle with making their presentations authentic, engaging, and memorable. This online course will provide a hands-on, practical introduction to immediately applicable techniques that will help you prepare and deliver engaging, participative, and impactful in-person and online presentations. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, group activities, and speechmaking, you will learn techniques to confidently deliver presentations, create content that invites engagement, and facilitate speaker/audience interactions that invite collaboration without losing control. Students will develop, deliver, and evaluate a presentation that is meaningful for them. With these presenting skills, you will be able to authentically deliver a compelling presentation tailored to your audience’s needs. 

Matt Abrahams, Lecturer, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Matt Abrahams is an educator and coach who has published research articles on cognitive planning, persuasion, and interpersonal communication. He is the author of Speaking Up Without Freaking Out, and a co-founder and principal at Bold Echo Communication Solutions. He received an MA in communication from UC Davis.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Matthew Abrahams, Speaking up without Freaking Out, 3rd edition (ISBN 978-1465290472)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Marketing Strategy for a Mobile World

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Your customers are mobile. That means you need to be mobile. To do that, you need a plan, and that’s what this course will provide. By looking at a set of interrelated building blocks, from market data to the competitive landscape to organizational and audience insights, this course will prepare you to market effectively in an increasingly mobile-centric world.

Starting with the rising use of smartphones worldwide, we will examine the key trends that are making mobile the fastest-growing marketing channel. The course will also take a step-by-step approach to developing a comprehensive mobile strategy. That includes dedicated sessions on how to gather, synthesize, and apply meaningful data about competitors, your own organization, and your audience. We’ll look at the essential elements of a mobile strategy framework and detail a set of conceptual tools that will help you begin to formulate your approach to mobile marketing. We’ll illustrate some of these concepts with specific examples of successes and failures, dos and don’ts. Along the way, we’ll touch on key partners and resources that are often integral to executing a mobile strategy. These will include platforms (from the established “Big Four”—Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google—to the emerging advertising and data stack), mobile carriers, service providers, and research tools such as comScore and Nielsen. Throughout, the focus will be on guidelines and best practices that will help ensure effective strategy execution. 

Noah Elkin, Research Director, Multichannel Marketing, Gartner

Noah Elkin’s career has revolved around the intersection of technology, strategy, marketing, and content. He is a co-author of Mobile Marketing: An Hour a Day. Before joining Gartner, Elkin served as chief product officer at Industry Index. Prior to that, he was executive editor and chief evangelist at eMarketer, where he wrote dozens of reports and delivered webinars and in-person presentations that helped clients understand the latest digital marketing, media, and commerce trends, and the implications for their business. He received a PhD from Rutgers and a Fulbright Fellowship to Brazil.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Julie Ask, Ted Schadler and Josh Bernoff, The Mobile Mind Shift: Engineer Your Business To Win in the Mobile Moment (ISBN B00KADTR74)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

The Upside of Stress (Spring '17)

Date: 
Monday, April 17, 2017

Offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Fee Applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mindset that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings.

Constitutional Law (Spring-2017)

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, June 9, 2017
Course topic: 

Registration opens February 27th. 

Fee applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In the wake of a transformative 2016 presidential election, there is no better time to study the United States Constitution. This course provides a brief primer on the Supreme Court and the US legal system, then explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. We will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion in Marbury v. Madison, as we discuss the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. Next, we will explore the ebb and flow of the commerce clause, and other aspects of legislative power. We will then discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including the constitutional implications of the “War on Terror.” Finally, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. With the Supreme Court (and the nation) undergoing rapid and unpredictable changes, we will surely have ample fodder to explore, discuss, and debate the Constitution. 

WHAT MAKES OUR ONLINE COURSES UNIQUE: 

  • Course sizes are limited.
    You won't have 5,000 classmates. This course's enrollment is capped at 45 participants.

  • Frequent interaction with the instructor.
    You aren't expected to work through the material alone. Instructors will answer questions and interact with students on the discussion board and through weekly video meetings.
  • Study with a vibrant peer group.
    Stanford Continuing Studies courses attract thoughtful and engaged students who take courses for the love of learning. Students in each course will exchange ideas with one another through easy-to-use message boards as well as optional weekly real-time video conferences.
  • Direct feedback from the instructor.
    Instructors will review and offer feedback on assignment submissions. Students are not required to turn in assignments, but for those who do, their work is graded by the instructor.
  • Courses offer the flexibility to participate on your own schedule.
    Course work is completed on a weekly basis when you have the time. You can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. If you can’t attend the weekly video meetings, the sessions are always recorded for you and your instructor is just an email away.
  • This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.
    To learn more about the program, visit our About Us page. For more information on the online format, please visit the FAQ page.

Cody S. Harris, Partner, Keker Van Nest & Peters

Cody S. Harris clerked for Judge David S. Tatel on the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit and has served as a deputy district attorney in Santa Clara County. He received a JD from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

Constitutional Law

Design Your Future: Design Innovation for Global Teams

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, June 9, 2017

Registration opens February 27th.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

In these times of rapid change, successful design innovation is distributed, global, and highly collaborative. This course provides you the mindset, solutions, and tools—along with cases and stories drawn from around the world—to build a team that can work across cultures to solve problems. We will focus on the ways that leading design innovators pull together partners, customers, and their own team members across the entire development process, from vision formation through the test and validation of new business opportunities. The course also notably draws on the time-tested methods and rich case history of “ME310: Product-Based Engineering Design, Innovation, and Development,” which has been offered at Stanford for more than fifty years. In ME310, students work across globally distributed teams, using a proven set of principles and tools, to help them move beyond traditional design thinking in order to deliver full-functioning, award-winning products and services.

For part of the course, you will work in small groups to solve problems that major international organizations have posed to the ME310 course in previous years. In the development of solutions, you’ll learn techniques in global teamwork, creativity, and design. Through the combination of short videos, readings, demonstrations, field work, and open forums with faculty, plus personal feedback, you will gain fast practice in understanding design innovation in a globally distributed environment. 

WHAT MAKES OUR ONLINE COURSES UNIQUE: 

  • Course sizes are limited.
    You won't have 5,000 classmates. This course's enrollment is capped at 45 participants.

  • Frequent interaction with the instructor.
    You aren't expected to work through the material alone. Instructors will answer questions and interact with students on the discussion board and through weekly video meetings.
  • Study with a vibrant peer group.
    Stanford Continuing Studies courses attract thoughtful and engaged students who take courses for the love of learning. Students in each course will exchange ideas with one another through easy-to-use message boards as well as optional weekly real-time video conferences.
  • Direct feedback from the instructor.
    Instructors will review and offer feedback on assignment submissions. Students are not required to turn in assignments, but for those who do, their work is graded by the instructor.
  • Courses offer the flexibility to participate on your own schedule.
    Course work is completed on a weekly basis when you have the time. You can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. If you can’t attend the weekly video meetings, the sessions are always recorded for you and your instructor is just an email away.
  • This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.
    To learn more about the program, visit our About Us page. For more information on the online format, please visit the FAQ page.

This is the second in a sequence of three courses on design innovation. In the Fall, students explored designing future solutions within a business context; in the Spring, students will design solutions in the context of global teams; and in the Summer, students will focus on design innovation in the context of personal leadership and growth. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Tamara Carleton, CEO and Founder, Innovation Leadership Board

Tamara Carleton helps organizations to create vision-led, radical innovations. She works closely with the Foresight and Innovation program at Stanford, where she explores how the world’s most innovative companies create technology visions and take action. She received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Larry Leifer, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford

Larry Leifer is the founding director of the Center for Design Research at Stanford. He has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1976, and he has taught the Stanford design innovation course ME310 for over 20 years. He received a PhD in biomedical engineering from Stanford.

William Cockayne, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering–Design, Stanford

William Cockayne has led teams in incubation, research, product development, and manufacturing as an executive and an entrepreneur. He has shipped over twenty successful products at companies large (Eastman Kodak, Daimler, Apple) and small (Scout Electromedia, Handstand, Nota Reader). At Stanford, he teaches the award-winning “ME410: Foresight and Technological Innovation,” a mainstay of innovation teaching and research on campus. He received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Design Your Future

How to Build Successful Startups: Learn Lessons Straight from Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs - Spring-2017

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, May 26, 2017

Registration opens February 27th

Fee applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Great companies, like great homes, can be built in many ways. Outstanding entrepreneurs, like outstanding architects, can learn much from the achievements of their predecessors. Designed for the budding entrepreneur, this course will introduce you to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, advisors, and investors, and the varied ways in which they’ve constructed successful startups.

During the course, numerous guest speakers will assist us in addressing these and other key questions: How can you overcome the critical challenges founders face, such as assessing your own unique goals, skills, and capabilities; forming a complementary core team; creating a breakthrough product; and raising initial capital? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of companies, whether big or small, technology- or market-focused, a traditional for-profit startup or a novel social enterprise? Which development path would be best to get your company off to a strong start? Should you go it alone, apply to an incubator or accelerator, or begin pitching venture firms immediately? What are effective ways to raise growth capital from a variety of sources? With rapid growth, what new organizational, managerial, and competitive challenges might your company face? What are useful metrics for measuring a startup’s progress? And, if all goes well, what is the IPO process like? Finally, what vital technological, educational, cultural, and other resources does Silicon Valley offer startups today?

Guest contributors include: Neerav Berry (Co-Founder and CEO, Payplant), Leon Chen (Venture Partner, OrbiMed Advisors), Adam Cheyer (Co-Founder and Vice President of Engineering, Viv Labs), Adam Draper (Managing Director, Boost VC), Timothy Draper (Founder, Draper Associates and DFJ), William H. Draper III (General Partner, Draper Richards LP and Co-Chairman, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation), Jim Fruchterman (Founder and CEO, Benetech), Jim Kleckner (Co-Founder and Vice President, Analytics, CloudPhysics), Kira Makagon (Executive Vice President of Innovation, RingCentral), Ambarish Malpani (Vice President of Engineering, Edmodo), Ted McCluskey (Chief Medical Officer, Finance Technology Leverage), Jessica McKellar (Director of Engineering, Dropbox), Alan Mendelson (Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP), Jan Møller Mikkelsen (President and CEO, Ascendis Pharma A/S), Daria Mochly-Rosen (The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine), Camilla Olson (Founder and CEO, Savitude), Cecily Anne O’Regan (Patent Attorney, Shartsis Friese LLP), George G.C. Parker (Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business), Rob Reis (Founder and CEO, Higher Ground), Elton Sherwin (President and Founder, Sherwin Advisors), and Glenn Winokur (CEO and Co-Founder, Syapse). 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

John Kelley, Co-Founder and COO, OnRisk

John Kelley is the COO of OnRisk, which provides software services to the commercial insurance industry. Earlier, he founded 399 Innovation, which advises firms on invention and innovation strategy. He received a JD from Stanford, where he pursued an independent research track in artificial intelligence and law. Kelley also studied at Sorø Akadamiet in Denmark on an American Field Service Fellowship.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Elton B. Sherwin Jr., The Silicon Valley Way, Second Edition: Discover 45 Secrets for Successful Start-Ups, Second Edition/Paperback (ISBN 0982796110)
(Recommended) William H. Draper III, The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, Paperback (ISBN 0230339948)
(Recommended) Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days, Paperback (ISBN 1430210788)
(Recommended) Ash Maurya, Running Lean: Iterate from Plan A to a Plan That Works, Second Edition/Hardcover (ISBN 1449305172)
(Recommended) William F. Miller et al., The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Paperback(ISBN 0804740631)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Build Successful Startups

The Science of Willpower and Change

Date: 
Monday, January 23, 2017 to Friday, March 3, 2017

Course Description:

Physical health, emotional well-being, social relationships, and professional success all require the ability to regulate our thoughts, emotions, and actions. Advances in psychology, neuroscience, medicine, and mind-body research are beginning to paint a new picture of what willpower is, why it matters, and how to develop it. Is willpower in the mind or in the body? Is it possible to run out of willpower, and how do you build a bigger reserve? What motivates people to change? Why do we talk ourselves out of things we really want or need to do? How much control over our thoughts and feelings do we really have, and what are the healthiest ways to regulate them? This course will address those questions through lectures, readings, and discussions and will give students the opportunity to apply the ideas of the course toward making an important change or pursuing a major goal in their lives. 

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

Course Instructor

Kelly McGonigal, Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), Stanford

Kelly McGonigal teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. In collaboration with CCARE, she has conducted scientific research on the benefits of compassion training. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford. She is the author of The Upside of Stress and The Willpower Instinct. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

(Recommended) McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct (ISBN 978-1583334386)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Science of Willpower and Change

The Geology and Wines of California and France

Date: 
Monday, January 30, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017

Course Description

This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and, with comparative tastings, form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not.

As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result.

The wines we will taste will compare both Old World (France) and New World (California): Burgundy and California’s Chardonnay and Pinot Noir; Loire varietals such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Muscadet, Pinot Noir, Gamay, and Cabernet Franc; northern and southern Rhône wines with Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, and a dozen others; plus Bordeaux blends from France and California made of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other Bordeaux varietals.

Pre-requisite: In order to participate in this course, students must be at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million–year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2017 catalogue (available in February 2017). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

To participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes with the instructors and invited winemakers to discuss their experiences with the terroir, grape varieties, winemaking styles, and taste sensations.

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

David G. Howell, Research Geologist (Retired), US Geological Survey

David G. Howell is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America. He has been working with Napa Valley vintners for more than twenty-five years and is the co-author of The Winemaker’s Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley. After retiring from the US Geological Survey, Howell was an adjunct professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Science from 2005 to 2009. He received a PhD from UC Santa Barbara and has authored more than 150 scientific articles.

Douglas Posson, Owner, Hexagonvins

Douglas Posson gathers and compiles data and information on wines. He is a co-founder of the US Global Change Research Program, and he led the US Geological Survey’s Arctic data team that received the Presidential Design Achievement Award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Visiting France annually for the past thirty years, he has explored the geography, terroir, food, and especially the wines in Alsace, Burgundy, Beaujolais, the Rhône, Provence, Languedoc, Roussillon, the Loire, the Southwest, and Bordeaux.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Karen MacNeil, The Wine Bible, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0-7611-8083-8)
(Required) Hugh Johnson & Jancis Robinson, The World Atlas of Wine, 7th Edition (ISBN 978-1-84533-689-9)
(Required) Madeline Puckette & Justin Hammack, Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to Wine, 1st Edition (ISBN 978-1-592-40899-3)
The Geology and Wines of California and France

Drawing Inspiration: Developing a Creative Practice

Date: 
Monday, February 13, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

From 40,000-year-old prehistoric cave paintings to the latest digital emoji symbols on our phones, making visual marks—drawing—has been a fundamental form of human communication, expression, and creativity. As children we have an innate ability to access creativity and to express ourselves through drawing, but as we get older we are trained to judge what we do as either “bad” or “good” (usually “bad”) and to leave the making of art to the “experts.” Many people find themselves cut off not only from drawing but also from their own creativity. This course is designed to reignite a sense of creative experimentation and exploration through drawing.

The core component of the course will be short daily drawing prompts that can be responded to anywhere with little more than a pencil and a small sketchbook. Unlike a studio class, the focus of this course is not about “learning to draw” or making an expertly rendered piece of art; rather, it is about the process of drawing and how it can support creativity in our lives. At first, we will focus on jumpstarting our creativity, tapping into our imaginations, and circumventing the critical tendencies that can inhibit us. Later, we will experiment with different ways to make marks, observing the world around (and within) us and exploring the inventive possibilities of drawing. By the end of the course, students will have the tools and confidence necessary to maintain their own creative drawing practice.

Students must purchase their own art supplies for this course and can expect to spend an additional $15–$25 on these materials.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Course Instructor

Trevor Tubelle, Artist

Trevor Tubelle is a San Francisco-based interdisciplinary artist working with hybrid forms of drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and performance. He has taught at Stanford Arts Institute (Honors in the Arts program) and UC Santa Cruz, among other places. His work is included in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Tubelle received an MFA in painting from the San Francisco Art Institute.

Drawing INspiriation: Developing a Creative Practice

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