Skip to content Skip to navigation

Continuing Studies

Date: 
Monday, January 23, 2017 to Friday, March 3, 2017
Go to Course

Course Description

Physical health, emotional well-being, social relationships, and professional success all require the ability to regulate our thoughts, emotions, and actions. Advances in psychology, neuroscience, medicine, and mind-body research are beginning to paint a new picture of what willpower is, why it matters, and how to develop it. Is willpower in the mind or in the body? Is it possible to run out of willpower, and how do you build a bigger reserve? What motivates people to change? Why do we talk ourselves out of things we really want or need to do? How much control over our thoughts and feelings do we really have, and what are the healthiest ways to regulate them? This course will address those questions through lectures, readings, and discussions and will give students the opportunity to apply the ideas of the course toward making an important change or pursuing a major goal in their lives. 

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

Course Instructor

Kelly McGonigal, Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), Stanford

Kelly McGonigal teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. In collaboration with CCARE, she has conducted scientific research on the benefits of compassion training. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford. She is the author of The Upside of Stress and The Willpower Instinct. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course

(Recommended) McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct (ISBN 978-1583334386)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Science of Willpower and Change

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, January 30, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017
Go to Course

Course Description

This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and, with comparative tastings, form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not.

As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result.

The wines we will taste will compare both Old World (France) and New World (California): Burgundy and California’s Chardonnay and Pinot Noir; Loire varietals such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Muscadet, Pinot Noir, Gamay, and Cabernet Franc; northern and southern Rhône wines with Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, and a dozen others; plus Bordeaux blends from France and California made of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other Bordeaux varietals.

Pre-requisite

In order to participate in this course, students must be at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million–year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2017 catalogue (available in February 2017). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

To participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes with the instructors and invited winemakers to discuss their experiences with the terroir, grape varieties, winemaking styles, and taste sensations.

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

David G. Howell, Research Geologist (Retired), US Geological Survey

David G. Howell is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America. He has been working with Napa Valley vintners for more than twenty-five years and is the co-author of The Winemaker’s Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley. After retiring from the US Geological Survey, Howell was an adjunct professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Science from 2005 to 2009. He received a PhD from UC Santa Barbara and has authored more than 150 scientific articles.

Douglas Posson, Owner, Hexagonvins

Douglas Posson gathers and compiles data and information on wines. He is a co-founder of the US Global Change Research Program, and he led the US Geological Survey’s Arctic data team that received the Presidential Design Achievement Award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Visiting France annually for the past thirty years, he has explored the geography, terroir, food, and especially the wines in Alsace, Burgundy, Beaujolais, the Rhône, Provence, Languedoc, Roussillon, the Loire, the Southwest, and Bordeaux.

Textbooks for this course

(Required) Karen MacNeil, The Wine Bible, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0-7611-8083-8)
(Required) Hugh Johnson & Jancis Robinson, The World Atlas of Wine, 7th Edition (ISBN 978-1-84533-689-9)
(Required) Madeline Puckette & Justin Hammack, Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to Wine, 1st Edition (ISBN 978-1-592-40899-3)
The Geology and Wines of California and France

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, February 13, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

From 40,000-year-old prehistoric cave paintings to the latest digital emoji symbols on our phones, making visual marks—drawing—has been a fundamental form of human communication, expression, and creativity. As children we have an innate ability to access creativity and to express ourselves through drawing, but as we get older we are trained to judge what we do as either “bad” or “good” (usually “bad”) and to leave the making of art to the “experts.” Many people find themselves cut off not only from drawing but also from their own creativity. This course is designed to reignite a sense of creative experimentation and exploration through drawing.

The core component of the course will be short daily drawing prompts that can be responded to anywhere with little more than a pencil and a small sketchbook. Unlike a studio class, the focus of this course is not about “learning to draw” or making an expertly rendered piece of art; rather, it is about the process of drawing and how it can support creativity in our lives. At first, we will focus on jumpstarting our creativity, tapping into our imaginations, and circumventing the critical tendencies that can inhibit us. Later, we will experiment with different ways to make marks, observing the world around (and within) us and exploring the inventive possibilities of drawing. By the end of the course, students will have the tools and confidence necessary to maintain their own creative drawing practice.

Students must purchase their own art supplies for this course and can expect to spend an additional $15–$25 on these materials.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Course Instructor

Trevor Tubelle, Artist

Trevor Tubelle is a San Francisco-based interdisciplinary artist working with hybrid forms of drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and performance. He has taught at Stanford Arts Institute (Honors in the Arts program) and UC Santa Cruz, among other places. His work is included in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Tubelle received an MFA in painting from the San Francisco Art Institute.

Drawing INspiriation: Developing a Creative Practice

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, October 3, 2016 to Friday, December 2, 2016
Go to Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Great companies, like great homes, can be built in many ways. Outstanding entrepreneurs, like outstanding architects, can learn much from the achievements of their predecessors. Designed for the budding entrepreneur, this course will introduce you to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, advisors, and investors, and the varied ways in which they’ve constructed successful startups.

During the course, numerous guest speakers will assist us in addressing these and other key questions: How can you overcome the critical challenges founders face, such as assessing your own unique goals, skills, and capabilities; forming a complementary core team; creating a breakthrough product; and raising initial capital? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of companies, whether big or small, technology- or market-focused, a traditional for-profit startup or a novel social enterprise? Which development path would be best to get your company off to a strong start? Should you go it alone, apply to an incubator or accelerator, or begin pitching venture firms immediately? What are effective ways to raise growth capital from a variety of sources? With rapid growth, what new organizational, managerial, and competitive challenges might your company face? What are useful metrics for measuring a startup’s progress? And, if all goes well, what is the IPO process like? Finally, what vital technological, educational, cultural, and other resources does Silicon Valley offer startups today?

Guest contributors include: Neerav Berry (Co-Founder and CEO, Payplant), Leon Chen (Venture Partner, OrbiMed Advisors), Adam Cheyer (Co-Founder and Vice President of Engineering, Viv Labs), Adam Draper (Managing Director, Boost VC), Timothy Draper (Founder, Draper Associates and DFJ), William H. Draper III (General Partner, Draper Richards LP and Co-Chairman, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation), Jim Fruchterman (Founder and CEO, Benetech), Jim Kleckner (Co-Founder and Vice President, Analytics, CloudPhysics), Kira Makagon (Executive Vice President of Innovation, RingCentral), Ambarish Malpani (Vice President of Engineering, Edmodo), Ted McCluskey (Chief Medical Officer, Finance Technology Leverage), Jessica McKellar (Director of Engineering, Dropbox), Alan Mendelson (Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP), Jan Møller Mikkelsen (President and CEO, Ascendis Pharma A/S), Daria Mochly-Rosen (The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine), Camilla Olson (Founder and CEO, Savitude), Cecily Anne O’Regan (Patent Attorney, Shartsis Friese LLP), George G.C. Parker (Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business), Rob Reis (Founder and CEO, Higher Ground), Elton Sherwin (President and Founder, Sherwin Advisors), and Glenn Winokur (CEO and Co-Founder, Syapse). 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

John Kelley, Co-Founder and COO, OnRisk

John Kelley is the COO of OnRisk, which provides software services to the commercial insurance industry. Earlier, he founded 399 Innovation, which advises firms on invention and innovation strategy. He received a JD from Stanford, where he pursued an independent research track in artificial intelligence and law. Kelley also studied at Sorø Akadamiet in Denmark on an American Field Service Fellowship.

Textbooks for this course

  • (Required) Elton B. Sherwin Jr., The Silicon Valley Way, Second Edition: Discover 45 Secrets for Successful Start-Ups, Second Edition/Paperback (ISBN 0982796110)
  • (Recommended) William H. Draper III, The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, Paperback (ISBN 0230339948)
  • (Recommended) Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days, Paperback (ISBN 1430210788)
  • (Recommended) Ash Maurya, Running Lean: Iterate from Plan A to a Plan That Works, Second Edition/Hardcover (ISBN 1449305172)
  • (Recommended) William F. Miller et al., The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Paperback(ISBN 0804740631)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Build Successful Startups

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2016
Go to Course

Value investors like Warren Buffett can beat not only the stock market, but also most other money managers as well. Why? What do value investors do differently from other investors? And if value investing works so well, why do so few people use it? 

In this online course, we will learn the fundamentals of analysis, projection, valuation, and implementation. We will first learn to analyze companies’ historical performance by calculating vital metrics like return on invested capital. Second, we will discover how to project future corporate performance using frameworks like Porter Five Forces analysis. Third, we will master how to value a stock. And finally, we will learn how to implement a value strategy by steering clear of short-term reporting, biases, and other hurdles. By tackling the tools of value investing and the keys to their implementation, students will gain insight into the capital management strategy that performs best over the long term. 

Investing

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, August 29, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Description

Compassion can be defined as the desire to relieve suffering, rooted in a sense of connection, caring, and courage. In this course, we will explore both the latest scientific research on compassion and the practical considerations for strengthening compassion in everyday life. We will explore the evolutionary and biological basis of compassion, how culture shapes who we feel empathy for, the most common barriers to compassion, and how compassion can be learned. We will also discuss the importance of self-compassion, how to deal with compassion fatigue, and how to translate a compassionate mindset into meaningful action.

The instructor for this course is a program developer and instructor for the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), which is striving to create a community of scholars and researchers, including neuroscientists, psychologists, neuroeconomists, and contemplative scholars, in order to undertake a rigorous scientific study of the neural, mental, and social bases of compassion and altruistic behavior. 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

Compassion

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The 2016 election is nearly upon us, and the Supreme Court hangs in the balance. This course provides a brief primer on the Supreme Court and the US legal system, then explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. We will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion in Marbury v. Madison, as we discuss the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. Next, we will explore the commerce clause, focusing on recent challenges to the Affordable Care Act. We will then discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including the constitutional implications of the “War on Terror.” Finally, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. With the Supreme Court (and the nation) poised on the brink of a potentially transformative election, there’s no better time to explore, discuss, and debate the Constitution. 

 

 

Constitutional Law

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 to Friday, August 12, 2016
Go to Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

What makes one product good and another great? Is the ability to drive game-changing innovation an inborn gift or a practice any person can develop? This course explores the brain science and psychological methodology of creative ideation and introduces new paths to elevating our “visionary quotient” as business innovators and leaders. 

We will explore neuroscience, design thinking, and mindfulness in product development as they relate to new thinking about the innovation process and the creation of extraordinary brand experiences. Drawing on leading-edge research in design and psychology— as well as timeless wisdom, Silicon Valley history, and the classic book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, which has guided many of the Valley’s most impactful business leaders—this course zeros in on the tangible and intangible attributes that make products great. With case studies spanning Apple, Google, Airbnb, Facebook, and other success stories, this course will illuminate new ways to guide product ideation, brand, and design. Entrepreneurs, marketers, developers, or anyone who wants to “think different” about innovation and take their impact to the next level will find actionable, differentiating insight in this course. 

Ellen Leanse, Tech Advisor; Entrepreneur

Ellen Leanse coaches startup teams and writes on innovation, mindfulness, and product design. She has advised more than forty technology companies, including Facebook, Microsoft, NeXT, Oracle, Intuit, and Samsung, and has worked with entrepreneurs in Africa, Asia, India, Latin America, and across the US. A member of the Macintosh launch team, Leanse was Apple’s first User Evangelist and forged the company’s pioneering steps into online communities. In 2012, PandoDaily named her as one of technology’s “Top Five Marketers” and the Silicon Valley Business Journal recognized her as a “Silicon Valley Woman of Influence.” She spoke on “Happiness by Design” at TEDxBerkeley 2016.

Textbooks for this course

(Required) David Rock, Your Brain at Work (ISBN 0061771295)
(Recommended) Nir Eyal, Hooked (ISBN 1591847788)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/professional---personal-development/unleashing-creative-innovation-and-building-great-products/20154_BUS-135-W#sthash.gWCsNSbE.dpuf

 

 

 

Unleashing Creative Innovation

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 to Friday, August 26, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Taking a product or service to market is the final stage in a design-led innovation process, and can be just as creative as the earlier brainstorming and prototyping stages. This course will focus on how and why design plays a crucial role in the successful launching and marketing of any business. You will learn how to determine market “fit” and begin a relationship with your community of users or customers; how to monitor trends and cultural shifts that impact product design; and the importance of a well-designed brand strategy and how it is communicated through every touchpoint with customers. We will also cover how design relates to business models and why investors are increasingly attracted to design-led businesses. The overarching goal is to provide a solid understanding of design principles that can contribute to and influence every viable business.

No previous business or design training is necessary.

Christopher Ireland 

Adjunct Professor, Design, California College of the Arts; Founder, Mix & Stir Studio

Christopher Ireland is a co-author of China’s New Culture of Cool and Rise of the DEO: Leadership by Design. She advises early-stage startups and teaches entrepreneurship. Previously, she was CEO of Cheskin, a consultancy focused on design innovation that supported Microsoft, Intel, Pepsi, and Apple, among others. Ireland received an MBA from UCLA.

Textbooks for this course

No required textbooks

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/professional---personal-development/design-implementation--getting-to-market/20154_DSN-103-W#sthash.S53g7oj2.dpuf

Design Implimentation

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Tuesday, July 5, 2016 to Friday, August 12, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mind-set that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings. 

This is an online course. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online videoconferencing sessions.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Kelly McGonigal, Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), Stanford

Kelly McGonigal teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. In collaboration with CCARE, she has conducted scientific research on the benefits of compassion training. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford. She is the author of The Upside of Stress and The Willpower Instinct. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course

(Recommended) McGonigal, The Upside of Stress (ISBN 978-1583335611)

 

The Upside of Stress

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Continuing Studies