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Stanford Center for Professional Development

(SCPD)  

Cyber Security and Executive Strategy

Overview

Open any news site and you’re bound to find a recent story about a devastating cyber security attack.  However, since many senior level managers do not understand the technical aspects of cyber security, they often allocate an insufficient amount of resources necessary to mitigate risk.

In this course, you’ll learn how to explain to all levels of management, including both technical and non-technical executive leadership, why cyber security must be a priority. You’ll learn how to educate and influence senior management so that security and risk mitigation becomes a primary component of corporate strategy.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply.

You Will Learn

  • Important Questions and Principles for Board Engagement
  • Black-Box and White-Box Security Assessments and Metrics
  • Prioritization of Vulnerabilities
  • Breach Preparation
  • Risk Assessments
  • Cyber Insurance

Recommended

An equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

It is also recommended that you start the certificate program with XACS101 - Software Security Foundations. It provides fundamental knowledge needed for the subsequent curriculum.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

Questions

650.741.1547

Energy Storage

Overview

Energy Storage has become a crucial factor in modern society, due to climate change and global sustainability.  From portable electronics to large scale power grids, this course examines the wide range of applications for both grid electricity storage and batteries, two examples of energy technologies that are important in everyday life as well as their potential applications in future devices.

In this class you will learn about the latest innovations and research in energy storage. You will explore the principals of batteries as well as their real and potential applications in a variety of products. Finally, you will be given an overview of each method of grid electricity storage and their possible technological applications.

Enrollment; Application and Fee Apply.

You Will Learn

  • Battery applications and parameters
  • Grid electricity storage and technologies
  • Power generation supply and demand
  • Chemical components and marketing of different types of batteries
  • Battery safety

Instructors

  • Yi Cui ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering
  • Matt Kanan ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering

Topics Include

  • Performance advantages and disadvantages of lead acid batteries
  • Inadequacy of existing technologies
  • Next generation of li-based batteries

Tuition

  • $249 per online course

Questions

Please contact
650.273.5459
scpd-energy@stanford.edu

Empathize and Prototype: A Hands On Dive into the Key Tools of Design Thinking

Course Description

Move beyond theory and dive into hands-on practice in the art of innovation. Tackle innovation challenges from start to finish and gain an in-depth understanding of these key tenets of design thinking and how to incorporate them into your work. Empathize with your customer, synthesize your learnings, and rapidly prototype and test your new ideas. Master techniques for gaining empathy with customers and immediately put them to use in a series of hands on exercises that guide you from synthesis to prototyping and testing.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply

Learn How To

Instructors

  • Perry Klebahn, Consulting Associate Professor and Executive Director of Executive Education, Stanford d.school, Stanford University
  • Jeremy Utley, Lecturer and Director of Executive Education, Stanford d.school, Stanford University

Computer and Network Security

Date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Overview

Computer systems security is arguably one of the most critical computer science issues today. Learn how to defend against various attack techniques and build reliable and secure code. Become an authority on privacy and digital rights management; and learn how to protect networks from harmful viruses and threats. Course projects will focus on building reliable code.

Instructors

  • Dan Boneh Professor of Computer ScienceStanford University
  • John Mitchell Professor of Computer ScienceStanford University

Topics Include

  • Network attacks and defenses
  • Operating system security
  • Application security (web, apps, databases)
  • Malware, privacy, and security for mobile devices

Units

3.0

Prerequisites

  • Understanding of operating systems, networking protocols, and a basic understanding of programming languages. Programming projects will be done in C, JavaScript, and PHP, but other languages may be needed.
  • Principles of Computer Systems (Stanford Course: CS110)

Recommended

Working knowledge of basic Unix

The International History of Nuclear Weapons

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

Course Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.

The Power of Stories to Fuel Innovation

Course Description

A big idea is not enough. You need people to create it and people to buy into it. Your big idea needs a story. Stories fuel innovation. They hold the power to transform listeners; to take listeners on a journey that changes how they think, feel or act. This interactive online course covers the variety of roles a narrative can play, and its potential to transform an organization or new venture. Explore why story is at the heart of effective innovation and how story can be used to transform culture.

Learn How To

Instructor

  • Jennifer Aaker, Professor of Marketing, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University

Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

Overview

This introduction to organizational behavior covers diverse topics ranging from employee selection and socialization to group dynamics and organizational culture. Understand the fundamentals propelling individual and collective behavior in organizations through an interactive blend of lectures, reading, discussion, and your own case studies. Focus on what it takes to spark performance in others while at the same time developing their confidence, skills, and abilities.

In spring quarter 2016-17, this course will be using prerecorded lectures and will not be offered on-campus.

Instructors

  • Robert Sutton Professor of Management Science and EngineeringStanford University

Topics Include

  • Organization theory
  • Concepts and functions of management
  • Behavior of the individual, work group, and organization behavior

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Prerequisites

  • 1 year of college level calculus (through calculus of several variables, such as MATH51 or CME100)
  • Background in statistics, experience with spreadsheets recommended.
  • An undergraduate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or equivalent

Organizational Behavior

Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition

Date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Overview

Computer Vision is a dynamic and rapidly growing field with countless high-profile applications that have been developed in recent years. The potential uses are diverse, and its integration with cutting edge research has already been validated with self-driving cars, facial recognition, 3D reconstructions, photo search and augmented reality. Artificial Intelligence has become a fundamental component of everyday technology, and visual recognition is a key aspect of that.  It is a valuable tool for interpreting the wealth of visual data that surrounds us and on a scale impossible with natural vision.

This course covers the tasks and systems at the core of visual recognition with a detailed exploration of deep learning architectures. While there will be a brief introduction to computer vision and frameworks, such as Caffe, Torch, Theano and TensorFlow, the focus will be learning end-to-end models, particularly for image classification. Students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks as well as gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision.

The final assignment will include training a multi-million parameter convolutional neural network and applying it on the largest image classification dataset (ImageNet).

Instructors

  • Justin Johnson Instructor, Computer Science

Topics Include

  • End-to-end models
  • Image classification, localization and detection
  • Implementation, training and debugging
  • Learning algorithms, such as backpropagation
  • Long Short Term Memory (LSTM)
  • Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN)
  • Supervised and unsupervised learning

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Students enrolling under the non degree option are required to take the course for 4.0 units.

Prerequisites

Proficiency in Python; familiarity with C/C++; CS131 and CS229 or equivalents; Math21 or equivalent, linear algebra.

Convolutional Neural Networks

Prototyping: Fast and Frequent Testing of New Ideas

Overview

Too often we think of prototypes as things we use to test an idea. But in d.thinking, we use the verb prototyping: building to think, acting almost before you are ready. In this session, your team will learn powerful tools with which you can bring your ideas to life. Perry and Jeremy will take you step-by-step through exercises that teach you how to implement a process of discovery for your projects. You and your team learn how to create a wide variety of low-resolution prototypes-from role playing activities to storyboards, from a wall of post-its to a gadget made of materials you can find at your desk.

Why prototype?

  • To communicate, start a conversation with users
  • To fail quickly and cheaply
  • To test possibilities
  • To manage the solution-building process by breaking down a large problem into testable chunks

If your team has taken the Ideation workshop, this Prototyping workshop will expand on the techniques you learned and help you test the ideas you generated.

To Participate in this Workshop:

Request info on the "Innovation at Work Workshop."

Fee Applies.

Prototyping

Exploiting and Protecting Web Applications

Overview

Web applications are vulnerable to many types of attacks to which traditional client-server applications are not as susceptible. These vulnerabilities, over the past several years, have resulted in attacks that have exposed companies to monetary losses and reputational damage.

This course covers these vulnerabilities, how attacks are constructed based on them, and techniques that can be used to mitigate such vulnerabilities.

Example web vulnerabilities covered in this course include client-state manipulation, cookie-based attacks, SQL injection, cross domain attacks (XSS, XSRF, XSSI), DNS rebinding, timing attacks, user tracking, and HTTP header injection. In addition, this course covers security issues that can arise in Web 2.0 and HTML5 applications that take advantage of heavy use of JavaScript, AJAX, mash-ups, and HTML5 extensions.

You Will Learn

  • Overview of Web Technologies (HTTP, cookies, JavaScript, caching, session management)
  • Browser Security Model (document object model, same-origin-policy andviolations of it), and SSL
  • Coverage of HTML5 vulnerabilities due to frame communication, localstorage, cross-origin resource sharing, and other HTML5 features
  • SQL Injection (and other forms of command injection including LDAP andXPath Injection)
  • Cross-site scripting (XSS), cross-site request forgery (XSRF), andcross-site script inclusion (XSSI), Clickjacking
  • Prevention techniques including input validation, output escaping, signatures, message authentication codes, and frame busting

Instructors

Recommended

We recommend you have the equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

We highly recommend that you take this course, Software Security Foundations (XACS101) as the 1st course within the Stanford ACS certificate program. It provides the fundamentals necessary for the subsequent courses in the program.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

On Demand Webinars

View our free on-demand webinars to get a preview of the courses we have to offer.

Questions

Please contact
650.741.1547
scpd-acs-mail@stanford.edu

Exploiting and Protecting Web Applicaitons

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