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Stanford Center for Professional Development

(SCPD)  

Date: 
Monday, June 26, 2017
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Overview

This introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizes modern software engineering principles with a focus on the first three of the four “D’s” of development: Design, Develop, Debug, and Deploy . Using these key topics, particular focus will be on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. Learn why programming requires a much higher level of artistry than simply the science of syntax.

Students will be required to develop software applications, primarily using the Java programming language.

Instructors

  • Nick Troccoli InstructorComputer Science

Topics Include

  • Object-oriented design
  • Decomposition
  • Encapsulation
  • Abstraction
  • Testing

Units

3.0 - 5.0

Students enrolling under the non degree option are required to take the course for 5.0 units.

Software Requirements

Students will use a special version of the Eclipse development environment, written specifially for use in this class. There are PC, Macintosh and Linux versions of the software. Installation instructions are available in the Downloading Eclipse handout. Additionally, you will need the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) installed on your computer. Further details of the software are below:

Windows Users:
  • Stanford Eclipse for Windows
  • Java 1.6 JRE installer for the PC
Mac Users:
  • Stanford Eclipse for Macintosh OSX
  • Your Mac should come with Java. However, run the "Software Update" utility (in the Apple menu) to make sure you have the most recent version.
Linux Users:
  • Stanford Eclipse for Linux
  • Download Java 1.6 from Sun's website

Prerequisites

This is an introduction to software development. No prior programming experience required.


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Date: 
Monday, September 11, 2017 to Wednesday, September 13, 2017
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Program Overview

Leadership, Strategy and Tools for 21st Century Challenges

Today’s leaders face one certainty: they are operating in an environment of uncertainty. Consumption is increasing. Resources are dwindling. Delivering stakeholder value is an imperative, but so is factoring in the global challenges we collectively face. Every decision has the potential to enhance – or compromise – the well-being and security of future generations.

That’s a lot of responsibility.

And it’s why Stanford recognizes sustainability as an essential component of effective leadership in the 21st century. Stanford’s new curriculum, Leadership for Sustainability, unpacks the core mindsets, knowledge and skills leaders need to promote sustainability and resilience in today’s complex environment.

Program

Enroll in Stanford’s 2.5 day program on Leadership for Sustainability and learn the critical skills you’ll need to lead change that can deliver long-term results.

You’ll learn to:

  • Navigate Complexity: Understand and learn strategies for identifying both risks and opportunities in today’s global environment.
  • Shift Perspective: Evolve decision-making processes to include environmental, social and economic considerations.
  • Initiate Positive Change: Learn how transformation happens through incremental creative partnerships and large-scale initiatives.
  • Return to your organization ready to:
  • Set realistic sustainability business objectives
  • Implement concrete strategies to drive change within your organization
  • Align teams around sustainability goals
  • Shift organizational culture to encompass a longer-view mindset
  • Employ systems thinking to identify broader, more effective solutions
  • Measure impact across a variety of dimensions that go beyond financial performance

Fee applies.

Who Should Enroll

Decision makers in any industry who understand that today’s global challenges require new skills and ways of thinking.
Executives who understand that sustainability is becoming a universal business language. Already fluent? Ready to start learning? The only prerequisite is the desire to lead change.
Leaders who recognize the business and moral imperative to make sustainability an intrinsic part of their organization.

Program tuition: $5,500

Tuition includes all course materials, three breakfasts, two lunches and receptions with participants and faculty.

Individual enrollments

$4,500 per person, if registered by July 15, 2017
$5,500 per person
Registration opens April 15th. Early bird registration ends July 15th.

Group enrollments (teams of 3 or more)

Additional discounts may be available for groups, contact us for more information.
Program to be held on September 11-13th on Stanford campus.

 


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Overview

Do you have what it takes to inspire people to practice—rather than just talk about—innovation? Professor Bob Sutton digs into the differences between leading innovation and managing routine work, reviews the hallmarks of skilled leaders with a special focus on staying in tune with the people you lead. The course features interviews with three star innovators: Mauria Finley, experienced corporate executive at large firms including Netscape and eBay and founder of Citrus Lane; Perry Klebhan, former CEO, inventor of the modern snowshoe, and director of executive education at the Stanford d.school; and Diego Rodriguez, partner at IDEO, author of the renowned Metacool blog, and cofounder of the Stanford d.school.

Learn How To:

  • Embrace "failure" and learn from it"
  • Learn the differences between routine and innovative work, the importance of having a place to fail, and why killing good ideas is sometimes necessary.
  • Manage creativity and innovation
  • Gain an understanding of creative processes, and understand why creative work must be managed differently.
  • Build and maintain a talented, motivated team
  • Learn about building and leading a creative team. Consider how self-fulfilling prophecies, money as a motivator, intrinsic rewards, stand-up meetings, and fostering constructive conflict can improve or hinder team performance.
  • Develop the skills of an in-tune leader
  • Reconsider traditional notions of leadership, and discover the leader's role in being assertive, celebrating small wins, and supporting team members.
  • Close the knowing-doing gap
  • Explore the traps that often prohibit implementation

Instructor

Robert Sutton, Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University
Resources

Questions

Please contact us at 650.741.1630 or
stanford-innovation@stanford.edu

 


 


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Overview

Open any news site and you’re bound to find a recent story about a devastating cyber security attack.  However, since many senior level managers do not understand the technical aspects of cyber security, they often allocate an insufficient amount of resources necessary to mitigate risk.

In this course, you’ll learn how to explain to all levels of management, including both technical and non-technical executive leadership, why cyber security must be a priority. You’ll learn how to educate and influence senior management so that security and risk mitigation becomes a primary component of corporate strategy.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply.

You Will Learn

  • Important Questions and Principles for Board Engagement
  • Black-Box and White-Box Security Assessments and Metrics
  • Prioritization of Vulnerabilities
  • Breach Preparation
  • Risk Assessments
  • Cyber Insurance
 

Recommended

An equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

It is also recommended that you start the certificate program with XACS101 - Software Security Foundations. It provides fundamental knowledge needed for the subsequent curriculum.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

Questions

650.741.1547

 


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Overview

Energy Storage has become a crucial factor in modern society, due to climate change and global sustainability.  From portable electronics to large scale power grids, this course examines the wide range of applications for both grid electricity storage and batteries, two examples of energy technologies that are important in everyday life as well as their potential applications in future devices.

In this class you will learn about the latest innovations and research in energy storage. You will explore the principals of batteries as well as their real and potential applications in a variety of products. Finally, you will be given an overview of each method of grid electricity storage and their possible technological applications.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply.

You Will Learn

  • Battery applications and parameters
  • Grid electricity storage and technologies
  • Power generation supply and demand
  • Chemical components and marketing of different types of batteries
  • Battery safety

Instructors

  • Yi Cui ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering
  • Matt Kanan ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering

Topics Include

  • Performance advantages and disadvantages of lead acid batteries
  • Inadequacy of existing technologies
  • Next generation of li-based batteries

Tuition

  • $249 per online course

Questions

Please contact
650.273.5459
scpd-energy@stanford.edu

 


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Course Description

Move beyond theory and dive into hands-on practice in the art of innovation. Tackle innovation challenges from start to finish and gain an in-depth understanding of these key tenets of design thinking and how to incorporate them into your work. Empathize with your customer, synthesize your learnings, and rapidly prototype and test your new ideas. Master techniques for gaining empathy with customers and immediately put them to use in a series of hands on exercises that guide you from synthesis to prototyping and testing.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply

Learn How To

Instructors

  • Perry Klebahn, Consulting Associate Professor and Executive Director of Executive Education, Stanford d.school, Stanford University
  • Jeremy Utley, Lecturer and Director of Executive Education, Stanford d.school, Stanford University

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Date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
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Overview

Computer systems security is arguably one of the most critical computer science issues today. Learn how to defend against various attack techniques and build reliable and secure code. Become an authority on privacy and digital rights management; and learn how to protect networks from harmful viruses and threats. Course projects will focus on building reliable code.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Network attacks and defenses
  • Operating system security
  • Application security (web, apps, databases)
  • Malware, privacy, and security for mobile devices

Units

3.0

Prerequisites

  • Understanding of operating systems, networking protocols, and a basic understanding of programming languages. Programming projects will be done in C, JavaScript, and PHP, but other languages may be needed.
  • Principles of Computer Systems (Stanford Course: CS110)

Recommended

Working knowledge of basic Unix

 


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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Course Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.


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Course Description

A big idea is not enough. You need people to create it and people to buy into it. Your big idea needs a story. Stories fuel innovation. They hold the power to transform listeners; to take listeners on a journey that changes how they think, feel or act. This interactive online course covers the variety of roles a narrative can play, and its potential to transform an organization or new venture. Explore why story is at the heart of effective innovation and how story can be used to transform culture.

Learn How To

Instructor

  • Jennifer Aaker, Professor of Marketing, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University

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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Overview

This introduction to organizational behavior covers diverse topics ranging from employee selection and socialization to group dynamics and organizational culture. Understand the fundamentals propelling individual and collective behavior in organizations through an interactive blend of lectures, reading, discussion, and your own case studies. Focus on what it takes to spark performance in others while at the same time developing their confidence, skills, and abilities.

In spring quarter 2016-17, this course will be using prerecorded lectures and will not be offered on-campus.

Instructors

  • Robert Sutton Professor of Management Science and EngineeringStanford University

Topics Include

  • Organization theory
  • Concepts and functions of management
  • Behavior of the individual, work group, and organization behavior

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Prerequisites

  • 1 year of college level calculus (through calculus of several variables, such as MATH51 or CME100)
  • Background in statistics, experience with spreadsheets recommended.
  • An undergraduate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or equivalent

 

Organizational Behavior

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