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Stanford Center for Professional Development

(SCPD)  

Date: 
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
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Overview

Computer Vision is a dynamic and rapidly growing field with countless high-profile applications that have been developed in recent years. The potential uses are diverse, and its integration with cutting edge research has already been validated with self-driving cars, facial recognition, 3D reconstructions, photo search and augmented reality. Artificial Intelligence has become a fundamental component of everyday technology, and visual recognition is a key aspect of that.  It is a valuable tool for interpreting the wealth of visual data that surrounds us and on a scale impossible with natural vision.

This course covers the tasks and systems at the core of visual recognition with a detailed exploration of deep learning architectures. While there will be a brief introduction to computer vision and frameworks, such as Caffe, Torch, Theano and TensorFlow, the focus will be learning end-to-end models, particularly for image classification. Students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks as well as gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision.

The final assignment will include training a multi-million parameter convolutional neural network and applying it on the largest image classification dataset (ImageNet).

Instructors

  • Justin Johnson Instructor, Computer Science

Topics Include

  • End-to-end models
  • Image classification, localization and detection
  • Implementation, training and debugging
  • Learning algorithms, such as backpropagation
  • Long Short Term Memory (LSTM)
  • Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN)
  • Supervised and unsupervised learning

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Students enrolling under the non degree option are required to take the course for 4.0 units.

Prerequisites

Proficiency in Python; familiarity with C/C++; CS131 and CS229 or equivalents; Math21 or equivalent, linear algebra.
Convolutional Neural Networks

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Overview

Too often we think of prototypes as things we use to test an idea. But in d.thinking, we use the verb prototyping: building to think, acting almost before you are ready. In this session, your team will learn powerful tools with which you can bring your ideas to life. Perry and Jeremy will take you step-by-step through exercises that teach you how to implement a process of discovery for your projects. You and your team learn how to create a wide variety of low-resolution prototypes-from role playing activities to storyboards, from a wall of post-its to a gadget made of materials you can find at your desk.

Why prototype?

  • To communicate, start a conversation with users
  • To fail quickly and cheaply
  • To test possibilities
  • To manage the solution-building process by breaking down a large problem into testable chunks

If your team has taken the Ideation workshop, this Prototyping workshop will expand on the techniques you learned and help you test the ideas you generated.

To Participate in this Workshop

Request info on the "Innovation at Work Workshop."

Fee Applies.

Prototyping

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Overview

Web applications are vulnerable to many types of attacks to which traditional client-server applications are not as susceptible. These vulnerabilities, over the past several years, have resulted in attacks that have exposed companies to monetary losses and reputational damage.

This course covers these vulnerabilities, how attacks are constructed based on them, and techniques that can be used to mitigate such vulnerabilities.

Example web vulnerabilities covered in this course include client-state manipulation, cookie-based attacks, SQL injection, cross domain attacks (XSS, XSRF, XSSI), DNS rebinding, timing attacks, user tracking, and HTTP header injection. In addition, this course covers security issues that can arise in Web 2.0 and HTML5 applications that take advantage of heavy use of JavaScript, AJAX, mash-ups, and HTML5 extensions.

You Will Learn

  • Overview of Web Technologies (HTTP, cookies, JavaScript, caching, session management)
  • Browser Security Model (document object model, same-origin-policy andviolations of it), and SSL
  • Coverage of HTML5 vulnerabilities due to frame communication, localstorage, cross-origin resource sharing, and other HTML5 features
  • SQL Injection (and other forms of command injection including LDAP andXPath Injection)
  • Cross-site scripting (XSS), cross-site request forgery (XSRF), andcross-site script inclusion (XSSI), Clickjacking
  • Prevention techniques including input validation, output escaping, signatures, message authentication codes, and frame busting

Instructors

Recommended

We recommend you have the equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

We highly recommend that you take this course, Software Security Foundations (XACS101) as the 1st course within the Stanford ACS certificate program. It provides the fundamentals necessary for the subsequent courses in the program.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

On Demand Webinars

View our free on-demand webinars to get a preview of the courses we have to offer.

Questions

Please contact
650.741.1547
scpd-acs-mail@stanford.edu

 

Exploiting and Protecting Web Applicaitons

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Online Team Workshop!

About the Workshop

Presentations are a necessity in all areas of a business but presentation skills are often overlooked as a core competency. Many of us even fear the process. Nerves and negative feedback can make you uncomfortable which quickly drain your energy, preventing the effective transfer of information to your audience. In this workshop, Perry Klebahn, Jeremy Utley and Scott Doorley take your team or group through an interactive step-by-step process to create presentations that draw the audience in.

Get ready to practice techniques to amplify the "power messages" in presentations and create active audiences.

  • Learn techniques to engage with an audience
  • Understand how to give feedback without being an expert on the topic
  • Explore ways to make the presentation goal clear and achieve the desired outcome

The new and innovative ideas that your team learns here will change your perspective of the presenting process.

Fee applies.

Presentations

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Course topic: 

Now Open!

Application and fee apply.

Overview

As a blueprint of DNA, a genome can reveal powerful new discoveries for the treatment and prevention of diseases. By placing focus on the individual patient versus the illness, genomic sequencing and analysis is challenging the traditional methods of diagnosis.

This course will expose you to the important role that genetics and genomics can play in medical decisions, practices and applications. From confirming a familial disease to identifying the potential of adverse drug reactions, the study of personal genomics is complex, extensive, and ready to be uncovered. Be at the forefront of this emerging branch of medicine that is shaping the future of precision healthcare.

This course is an elective course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You Will Learn

  • Accuracy of current technologies and state of the field
  • Challenges for implementing genomics into the clinic
  • Considerations for interpreting genome and genetic variants
  • Methods to acquire genetic data for medical and consumer testing
  • Role of genetics in drug response (pharmacogenomics)
  • Pros and cons of clinical genetic testing in prenatal, pediatric and adult settings

Instructors

  • Russ Altman Professor of Bioengineering, Genetics, MedicineStanford University
  • Euan Ashley Associate Professor of Medicine, of GeneticsStanford University
  • Kasia Bryc Population Geneticist23andMe
  • Dianna Fisk Senior Scientific CuratorStanford University
  • Julie Granka Population GeneticistAncestry.com
  • Hank Greely Professor of Law and (by Courtesy) of GeneticsStanford University
  • Bethann Hromatka Health Content Manager23andMe
  • Stuart Kim Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics,Stanford University
  • Kelly Ormond Professor (Teaching) of GeneticsStanford University
  • Michael Snyder Professor and Chair in GeneticsStanford University

Tuition

  • $495 per Elective Course

 

Personal Genomics and Health

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Application and fee apply.

Overview

Integrating computation, visualization and programming with MATLAB is a powerful approach to model and control systems. This course builds on the fundamentals of calculus to explore vector analysis techniques that are essential for engineers. Using examples drawn from various engineering fields, it introduces differential and integral vector calculus and linear algebra to analyze the effects of changing conditions on a system.

Topics Include

  • Analytic geometry in space
  • Green's, divergence and Stokes' theorems
  • Integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates
  • Lagrange multipliers
  • Matrix operations
  • Partial derivatives
  • Unconstrained maxima and minima

Instructors

  • Hung Le LecturerInstitute for Computational & Mathematical Eng.

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math41 and 42.

Vector Calculus

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Application and fee apply.

Overview

The potential application for Bitcoin-like technologies is enormous. This course covers the technical aspects of engineering secure software, system interactions with crypto-currencies, and distributed consensus for reliability.

Instructors

  • Dan BonehProfessor of Computer ScienceStanford University

Topics Include

  • Altcoins
  • Bitcoin transactions
  • Consensus protocols
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Elliptic curves
  • Hash functions
  • Mining strategies and incentives
  • Proposed Bitcoin regulations
  • Zerocoin, zerocash

Units

3.0

Prerequisites

CS110CS255 is recommended

Certificates and Degrees

 

Bitcoin and Crypto Currencies

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Application Required: Apply Now

Fee Applies.

Applications may be submitted online at anytime. Sample Application

Now open!

Course Overview

From smartphones to tablets to watches, users are relying more and more on the convenience of mobile technology. Organizations must meet this growing trend with greater security measures to support critical business functions and protect sensitive data on enterprise devices. Mobile architectures, applications, networks and services must all be developed and managed in compliance with the oversight of a strong IT workforce.

This course provides an in-depth technical overview of the security features and limitations of modern mobile operating systems, including the top risks and vulnerabilities, every IT professional needs to know.

You Will Learn

  • Mobile application security measures
    • Native, API-based, Web-based and HTML5 system architectures are covered in Android, Surface, Apple and Samsung devices. The latest threats to mobile application security including data leakage, identifier leakage, third-party tags and libraries, and location privacy are also reviewed. An ecosystem-level of available application store defenses are detailed using Bouncer (Android automated vetting) and iOS (Apple manual and automated vetting) to demonstrate permission models and defense against circumvention.
  • Models to develop and secure Android applications
    • WebView, common cryptographic mistakes and marketplace issues reveal how malicious intent can cause security breaches in Android applications. Establishing practices to defend against threats through app code signing, runtime processing, permissions and other features like Bytecode are discussed.
  • Security detection and measures in iOS
    • The iOS security architecture is comprised of specific features for ensuring trust—secure boot chain, secure enclave, app data protection and data classes. These security measures are covered with attention to privacy mechanisms for service through iMessage and iCloud; network oversight through Bluetooth and AirDrop are also covered.
  • Trends in mobile device management (MDM)
    • Device requirements for MDM are reviewed in detail: configuration and hardening, encryption, backup and recovery, remote wipe, patch management, enterprise VPN and proxy. Additionally, measures to monitor, enforce and report on enterprise device activity are covered using case studies from MobileIron, AirWatch and Enterproid.

Instructors

  • Dan Boneh, Professor of Computer Science, Stanford University
  • Neil Daswani, Chief Information Security Officer, LifeLock
  • John Mitchell, Professor of Computer Science, Stanford University

Recommended

We recommend you have the equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

We highly recommend that you take this course, Software Security Foundations (XACS101) as the 1st course within the Stanford ACS certificate program. It provides the fundamentals necessary for the subsequent courses in the program.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

On Demand Webinars

View our free on-demand webinars to get a preview of the courses we have to offer.

Questions

Please contact

650.741.1547

scpd-acs-mail@stanford.edu

Certificates and Degrees RDP Removing Degrees and Certificates

Course Access   

60 day access to the online course starts upon payment.

Course Materials 

Course materials are available for download from the online videos page to allow for printing and review.

Final Exam

Online participants are asked to complete a final exam at the end of each course to maintain the integrity of the program. A digital record of completion will be emailed to participants when they pass the exam.

Course Evaluation

It is required that participants complete the course evaluation once they have passed the final exam.

 

Mobile Security

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Date: 
Monday, July 25, 2016
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Course topic: 

Fee Applies.

Now Open!

ABOUT THIS COURSE

New College-and-Career-Readiness standards emphasize the importance of speaking, listening, and conversing not only as a means for learning, but also as a valuable goal of learning. This short summer course is intended to help teachers prepare for teaching students to have in-depth conversations about content area concepts and topics. The first month of school is a vital time for establishing norms, building participation structures, preparing lessons, and fostering a culture of productive and respectful communication. The three sessions in this course will provide you with clear explanations, examples, and rationales for establishing constructive classroom conversations from the get go, when it counts the most.

Thousands of educators have participated in our professional development courses. A big a-ha! moment for these participants is the introduction to and practice with language tools. In this course we will be working with the Conversation Analysis Tool that has been developed by our team. The Conversation Analysis Tool is aligned with the shift in contemporary English Language Proficiency standards and focuses on language functions (what students do with language as they engage with content and interact with others) rather than language forms (grammar and vocabulary). Teachers can use this tool to examine whether conversational turns are building up previous turns to build up an idea, and more importantly, whether the conversational turns focus on content or skills related to the lesson objectives. This quick and easy tool allows teachers to formatively evaluate teaching and student learning, and to receive and offer feedback on a daily and weekly basis.

This course will serve as good preparation for our quarter-long Constructive Classroom Conversations course in the fall. Participants will be able to build on and put into practice what they have learned in this short course, and to collect, analyze and act on conversations between their own students.

Classroom teachers and instructional coaches from grades K to 12 and in all subject areas are welcome and encouraged to take this course together with their colleagues (for example, content teachers with ELD/ESL teachers).

COURSE CONTENT AT-A-GLANCE

This course consists of three online sessions, three weeks in a row. Each session includes expert video screencasts, classroom video clips, readings and resources, and assignments that will prompt participants to strengthen the curricular foundations of communication the first month of school.

  • Session 1: Establishing a Classroom Culture of Conversation (August 2 - August 8) - This session provides models and suggested activities for cultivating classrooms that value learning through constructive conversation.
  • Session 2: Creating Effective Conversation Prompts & Tasks (August 9 - August 15) - This session focuses on how to look at a lesson, envision the conversational opportunities, and craft effective prompts for back and forth conversations between students.
  • Session 3: Preparing for Effective & Efficient Formative Assessment of Conversations (August 16 - August 22) - The session prepares participants to (1) set up an assessment plan for assessing and reflecting on observations of paired student conversations, (2) provide immediate feedback to students during their conversations, and (3) reflect on conversation assessment to improve teaching and assessment.

COURSE INSTRUCTORS

Kenji Hakuta; Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

Kenji Hakuta is active in education policy. He has testified to Congress and courts on language policy, the education of language minority students, affirmative action in higher education, and improvement of quality in educational research. Kenji is an elected Member of the National Academy of Education, a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, recognized for his accomplishments in Linguistics and Language Sciences. He has served on the board of various organizations, including the Educational Testing Service, the Spencer Foundation, and the New Teacher Center.

Jeff Zwiers; Senior Researcher in the Graduate School of Education

Jeff has worked for more than fifteen years as a professional developer and instructional mentor in urban school settings, emphasizing the development of literacy, thinking, and academic language for linguistically and culturally diverse students. He has published books and articles on reading, thinking, and academic language. His most recent book is Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings. His current work at the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching focuses on developing teachers’ core practices for teaching academic language, comprehension of complex texts, and oral communication skills across subject areas.

Sara Rutherford-Quach; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Education

Sara Rutherford-Quach, a former bilingual elementary teacher, has more than 13 years of experience working with linguistically diverse students and their teachers and has conducted extensive research on instructional practices for English learners. Sara was previously awarded a National Academy of Education Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for her work on the role of silence and speech in an elementary classroom serving language-minority students. Her areas of interest include classroom discourse and interaction analysis; language, culture, and instruction in multilingual and multicultural educational environments; institutional, policy, and curricular change; and educational equity. Sara has been involved with the design and teaching of more than 20 MOOC offerings since 2013 and she also directed the development of many learning modules with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the ELPA 21 Consortium.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is there any prerequisite for the course?

No.

Will I get a Record of Completion?

Students will receive a Record of Completion upon finishing the course requirements. Please note that Stanford University makes no representation that participation in the course, including participation leading to a statement of accomplishment, will be accepted by any school district or other entity as evidence of professional development. Participants are solely responsible for determining whether participation in the course, including obtaining a record of completion, will be accepted by a school district, or any other entity, as evidence of professional development coursework.

What is the course pace?

Unlike a traditional classroom, there is no specific time or day that you must log on or “attend” class: you are free to complete the session tasks at your own pace as long as you finish them within the allotted time.

Any additional textbooks or software required?

No.

Effective Conversation

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Overview

New research shows that genetic variations continue to accrue throughout tumor development. Having the ability to conduct deep sequencing on the healthy and cancerous cells in a patient, at multiple stages of growth and treatment, has led to invaluable findings and new directions for analyses in the field.

This course explores the role of genomics in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Providing a greater view of mutations through tumor profiling, more targeted and personalized health care can be administered and positively impact disease outcomes. Discover the latest research advancing the study of cancer and the power of genomics in medical decision making.

This course is an elective course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You Will Learn

  • Assessments of hereditary risk through multi-gene panel screens
  • Classifications of cancers by genomic differences
  • Evolutions of cancer cells that cause treatment resistance
  • New technologies for non-invasive analyses
  • Spectrums and sub-types of cancer mutations

Instructors

Tuition

  • $495 per Elective Course

 

Cancer Genomics

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