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Design & Creativity

The Geology and Wines of California and France

Date: 
Monday, January 30, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017

Course Description

This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and, with comparative tastings, form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not.

As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result.

The wines we will taste will compare both Old World (France) and New World (California): Burgundy and California’s Chardonnay and Pinot Noir; Loire varietals such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Muscadet, Pinot Noir, Gamay, and Cabernet Franc; northern and southern Rhône wines with Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, and a dozen others; plus Bordeaux blends from France and California made of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other Bordeaux varietals.

Pre-requisite: In order to participate in this course, students must be at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million–year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2017 catalogue (available in February 2017). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

To participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes with the instructors and invited winemakers to discuss their experiences with the terroir, grape varieties, winemaking styles, and taste sensations.

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

David G. Howell, Research Geologist (Retired), US Geological Survey

David G. Howell is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America. He has been working with Napa Valley vintners for more than twenty-five years and is the co-author of The Winemaker’s Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley. After retiring from the US Geological Survey, Howell was an adjunct professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Science from 2005 to 2009. He received a PhD from UC Santa Barbara and has authored more than 150 scientific articles.

Douglas Posson, Owner, Hexagonvins

Douglas Posson gathers and compiles data and information on wines. He is a co-founder of the US Global Change Research Program, and he led the US Geological Survey’s Arctic data team that received the Presidential Design Achievement Award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Visiting France annually for the past thirty years, he has explored the geography, terroir, food, and especially the wines in Alsace, Burgundy, Beaujolais, the Rhône, Provence, Languedoc, Roussillon, the Loire, the Southwest, and Bordeaux.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Karen MacNeil, The Wine Bible, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0-7611-8083-8)
(Required) Hugh Johnson & Jancis Robinson, The World Atlas of Wine, 7th Edition (ISBN 978-1-84533-689-9)
(Required) Madeline Puckette & Justin Hammack, Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to Wine, 1st Edition (ISBN 978-1-592-40899-3)
The Geology and Wines of California and France

Drawing Inspiration: Developing a Creative Practice

Date: 
Monday, February 13, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

From 40,000-year-old prehistoric cave paintings to the latest digital emoji symbols on our phones, making visual marks—drawing—has been a fundamental form of human communication, expression, and creativity. As children we have an innate ability to access creativity and to express ourselves through drawing, but as we get older we are trained to judge what we do as either “bad” or “good” (usually “bad”) and to leave the making of art to the “experts.” Many people find themselves cut off not only from drawing but also from their own creativity. This course is designed to reignite a sense of creative experimentation and exploration through drawing.

The core component of the course will be short daily drawing prompts that can be responded to anywhere with little more than a pencil and a small sketchbook. Unlike a studio class, the focus of this course is not about “learning to draw” or making an expertly rendered piece of art; rather, it is about the process of drawing and how it can support creativity in our lives. At first, we will focus on jumpstarting our creativity, tapping into our imaginations, and circumventing the critical tendencies that can inhibit us. Later, we will experiment with different ways to make marks, observing the world around (and within) us and exploring the inventive possibilities of drawing. By the end of the course, students will have the tools and confidence necessary to maintain their own creative drawing practice.

Students must purchase their own art supplies for this course and can expect to spend an additional $15–$25 on these materials.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Course Instructor

Trevor Tubelle, Artist

Trevor Tubelle is a San Francisco-based interdisciplinary artist working with hybrid forms of drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and performance. He has taught at Stanford Arts Institute (Honors in the Arts program) and UC Santa Cruz, among other places. His work is included in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Tubelle received an MFA in painting from the San Francisco Art Institute.

Drawing INspiriation: Developing a Creative Practice

Presentations! Present Your Ideas and Turn Them Into Action

Online Team Workshop!

About the Workshop:

Presentations are a necessity in all areas of a business but presentation skills are often overlooked as a core competency. Many of us even fear the process. Nerves and negative feedback can make you uncomfortable which quickly drain your energy, preventing the effective transfer of information to your audience. In this workshop, Perry Klebahn, Jeremy Utley and Scott Doorley take your team or group through an interactive step-by-step process to create presentations that draw the audience in.

Get ready to practice techniques to amplify the "power messages" in presentations and create active audiences.

  • Learn techniques to engage with an audience
  • Understand how to give feedback without being an expert on the topic
  • Explore ways to make the presentation goal clear and achieve the desired outcome

The new and innovative ideas that your team learns here will change your perspective of the presenting process.

Fee applies.

Presentations

Online Jamming and Concert Technology-Autumn 2016

Date: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Course Description

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.

Schedule

Course runs October 4, 2016 - February 7, 2017

Session 1: Overview
Overview of Online Jamming and Concert Technology

Session 2: Basics And Setup
Basics: Network protocols, audio signals + soundcards and network audio.

Session 3: Jacktrip Application + Connection
Things that go wrong with Jacktrip: Network & Audio. P2P Sessions and Multi-site setups.

Session 4: Debugging
Debug examples of typical problems.

Session 5: Polish And Practice
Polish techniques and spawn more practice sessions.

Session 6: Future
Future of the art and practice of network audio, alternative platforms for network audio.

Instructor

Chris Chafe, Professor of Music and Director of CCRMA

    Chris Chafe is a composer, improviser, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance, and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent work includes the Brain Stethoscope project, PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

    Requirements

    Equipment: Computer (running Linux, OS X, or Windows) with installation privileges
    Software: JackTrip (plus Jack) and Audacity
    Wired Internet: at least 5Mbps download and upload

    Online Jamming and Concert Technology

    Physics-based Sound Synthesis for Games and Interactive Systems (Fall-16)

    Date: 
    Tuesday, September 20, 2016 to Tuesday, January 24, 2017

    About the Course

    This course introduces the basics of Digital Signal Processing and computational acoustics, motivated by the vibrational physics of real-world objects and systems. We will build from a simple mass-spring and pendulum to demonstrate oscillation, learn how to simulate those systems in the computer, and also prove that these simple oscillations behave as a sine wave. From that we move to plucked strings and struck bars, showing both solutions as combined traveling waves and combined sine wave harmonics. We continue to build and simulate more complex systems containing many vibrating objects and resonators (stringed instruments, drum, plate), and also learn how to simulate echos and room reverberation. Through this process, we will learn about digital signals, filters, oscillators, harmonics, spectral analysis, linear and non-linear systems, particle models, and all the necessary building blocks to synthesize essentially any sound. The free open-source software provided will make it possible for anyone to use physical models in their art-making, game or movie sound, or any other application.

    SCHEDULE *

    Course runs until August 31, 2016

    Session 1: The Time Domain: Sound, Digital Audio, PCM Files, Noise Vs. Pitch, A Hint Of Spectra 
    a) Sound in Air, Traveling Waves b) Digital Audio, Sampling, Quantization, Aliasing c) Soundfiles, Wavetables, Manipulating PCM d) Pitch (vs. Noise), Spectral Analysis 0.1 e) Time-domain Pitch/Noise Detection: ZeroXings, AMDF, Autocorrelation
    Session 2: Physics, Oscillators, Sines & Spectra, Spectral/Additive Synthesis 
    a) Mass-Spring-Damper system, also simple Pendulum b) Fourier analysis/synthesis, Spectrum Analysis 1.0 c) More on additive Sine-wave synthesis
    Session 3: Digital Filters, Modal Synthesis 
    a) Digital Filters, Finite Impulse Response (FIR) b) Linearity, Time-invariance, Convolution c) Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) Digital Filters d) BiQuad Resonator Filter, Modal Synthesis
    Session 4: Physical Modeling Synthesis: 1D Systems 
    a) 1-D systems, Strings, Modal (Fourier) Solution b) Strings II: Waveguide (D’Alembert) Solution c) 1-D systems, Bars, Tubes, solutions d) Advanced Waveguide Synthesis for 1-D systems
    Session 5: Physical Modeling II: 2 And 3-D Systems 
    a) 2-D systems, plates, drums, higher-order modes Fourier (Sine and/or Modal) Solutions, Waveguide Solutions b) 3-D systems, rooms, resonators, Meshes, Waveguides c) Resonator/Modal view and solution of 3-D systems Pop bottles and other lumped resonators
    Session 6: Subtractive Synthesis, Vocal Sounds And Models 
    a)  Subtractive Synthesis, Voice Synthesis, Formants b) Linear Prediction, LPC c) FOFs d) FM Synthesis: Horns, Bells, Voices
    Session 7: Grains, Particles And Statistical Models 
    a) Wavelets b) Granular Synthesis c) Particle Models, Statistical Modal Synthesis d) Wind, Water, Surf, and Other Whooshing Sounds
    Session 8: Extending And Refining Physical Synthesis Models 
    a) Waveshaping Synthesis, Distortion Modeling b) Time-Varying Systems c) Stiffness, All-Pass Filters, Banded Waveguides d) Commuted Synthesis e) JULIUS on KS, strings, demos
    Session 9: Tying It All Together: Applications, Sonification, Interactions, And Control 
    a) Scanned Synthesis b)  Don’t forget the laptop!!! SMELT:   c) Controlling Synthesis with game controllers (Wii, mobile TouchOSC, more) d) Walking Synthesis, a complete system e) Procedural Audio: Driving synthesis from process, game state, etc. f) Data set Sonification
    * This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

    What you need to take this course:

    • Software: ChucK (also optionally STK, PeRColate for Max/MSP, Processing, GL/Glut)

    Recommended (highly) Textbook:

    • Operating system: Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux (Planet CCRMA recommended)
    • Desired: familiarity with algebra. no calculus required.
    • Helpful to have: some personal sound-making things: a guitar or other stringed instrument, a drum, a kitchen pan, a prayer bowl, glasses, bowls, voice...

    COURSE INSTRUCTORS

    Perry Cook

      Perry R. Cook is Emeritus Professor of Computer Science (also Music) at Princeton University, founding advisor/consultant to social music company SMule, and consulting professor at CalArts, Stanford CCRMA. With Dan Trueman, he co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which received a MacArthur Digital Learning Initiative Grant in 2005. With Ge Wang, Cook is co-author of the ChucK Programming Language. His newest book is “Programming for Digital Musicians and Artists,” with Ajay Kapur, Spencer Salazar, and Ge Wang. The recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cook is (still) working on a new book, "La Bella Voce e La Macchina (the Beautiful Voice and the Machine), A History of Technology and the Expressive Voice." Perry is also co-founder of Kadenze.

      Julius Smith

        Julius O. Smith normally teaches a music signal-processing course sequence and supervises related research at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is formally a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering. In 1975, he received his BS/EE degree from Rice University, where he got started in the field of digital signal processing and modeling for control. In 1983, he received the PhD/EE degree from Stanford University, specializing in techniques for digital filter design and system identification, with application to violin modeling. His work history includes the Signal Processing Department at Electromagnetic Systems Laboratories, Inc., working on systems for digital communications, the Adaptive Systems Department at Systems Control Technology, Inc., working on research problems in adaptive filtering and spectral estimation, and NeXT Computer, Inc., where he was responsible for sound, music, and signal processing software for the NeXT computer workstation. Prof. Smith is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He is the author of four online books and numerous research publications in his field.

        Sound Synthesis

        Audio Signal Processing for Music Applications

        Next session opens March 27th.

        About this course:

        In this course you will learn about audio signal processing methodologies that are specific for music and of use in real applications. We focus on the spectral processing techniques of relevance for the description and transformation of sounds, developing the basic theoretical and practical knowledge with which to analyze, synthesize, transform and describe audio signals in the context of music applications.

        The course is based on open software and content. The demonstrations and programming exercises are done using Python under Ubuntu, and the references and materials for the course come from open online repositories. We are also distributing with open licenses the software and materials developed for the course.

        Who is this class for: This course is primary aimed at advanced undergraduate or master students, along with professionals, interested in signal processing, programming and music.

        Created by: Universitat Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona, Stanford University

        Universitat Pompeu Fabra of BarcelonaStanford University

        FAQs

        Can I take this course for free?
        Yes, there is no fee in this course. You can follow the course, do the assignments, and obtain a final grade completely for free.
        Can I pay to get a Course Certificate?
        No, we do not offer this option.
        What resources will I need for this class?
        All the materials and tools for the class are available online under open licences.
        Do I need to buy a textbook for the course?
        No, it is self-contained.
        How much programming background is needed for the course?
        All the assignments start from some existing Python code that the student have to understand and modify. Some programming experience is necessary.
        What is the coolest thing I'll learn if I take this class?
        You will play around with sounds a lot, analysing them, transforming them, and making interesting new sounds.

        Instructors

        Xavier Serra
        Taught by: Xavier Serra, Associate Professor
        Dept. of Information and Communication Technologies, UPF
        Julius Smith
        Taught by: Julius Smith, Professor of Music and (by courtesy) Electrical Engineering
        CCRMA

        Unleashing Creative Innovation and Building Great Products

        Date: 
        Monday, June 20, 2016 to Friday, August 12, 2016

        COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

        What makes one product good and another great? Is the ability to drive game-changing innovation an inborn gift or a practice any person can develop? This course explores the brain science and psychological methodology of creative ideation and introduces new paths to elevating our “visionary quotient” as business innovators and leaders. 

        We will explore neuroscience, design thinking, and mindfulness in product development as they relate to new thinking about the innovation process and the creation of extraordinary brand experiences. Drawing on leading-edge research in design and psychology— as well as timeless wisdom, Silicon Valley history, and the classic book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, which has guided many of the Valley’s most impactful business leaders—this course zeros in on the tangible and intangible attributes that make products great. With case studies spanning Apple, Google, Airbnb, Facebook, and other success stories, this course will illuminate new ways to guide product ideation, brand, and design. Entrepreneurs, marketers, developers, or anyone who wants to “think different” about innovation and take their impact to the next level will find actionable, differentiating insight in this course. 

        Ellen Leanse, Tech Advisor; Entrepreneur

        Ellen Leanse coaches startup teams and writes on innovation, mindfulness, and product design. She has advised more than forty technology companies, including Facebook, Microsoft, NeXT, Oracle, Intuit, and Samsung, and has worked with entrepreneurs in Africa, Asia, India, Latin America, and across the US. A member of the Macintosh launch team, Leanse was Apple’s first User Evangelist and forged the company’s pioneering steps into online communities. In 2012, PandoDaily named her as one of technology’s “Top Five Marketers” and the Silicon Valley Business Journal recognized her as a “Silicon Valley Woman of Influence.” She spoke on “Happiness by Design” at TEDxBerkeley 2016.

        Textbooks for this course:

        (Required) David Rock, Your Brain at Work (ISBN 0061771295)
        (Recommended) Nir Eyal, Hooked (ISBN 1591847788)

        DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/professional---personal-d...

        Unleashing Creative Innovation

        Design Implementation: Getting to Market

        Date: 
        Monday, June 20, 2016 to Friday, August 26, 2016
        Course topic: 

        COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

        Taking a product or service to market is the final stage in a design-led innovation process, and can be just as creative as the earlier brainstorming and prototyping stages. This course will focus on how and why design plays a crucial role in the successful launching and marketing of any business. You will learn how to determine market “fit” and begin a relationship with your community of users or customers; how to monitor trends and cultural shifts that impact product design; and the importance of a well-designed brand strategy and how it is communicated through every touchpoint with customers. We will also cover how design relates to business models and why investors are increasingly attracted to design-led businesses. The overarching goal is to provide a solid understanding of design principles that can contribute to and influence every viable business.

        No previous business or design training is necessary.

        Christopher Ireland, Adjunct Professor, Design, California College of the Arts; Founder, Mix & Stir Studio

        Christopher Ireland is a co-author of China’s New Culture of Cool and Rise of the DEO: Leadership by Design. She advises early-stage startups and teaches entrepreneurship. Previously, she was CEO of Cheskin, a consultancy focused on design innovation that supported Microsoft, Intel, Pepsi, and Apple, among others. Ireland received an MBA from UCLA.

        Textbooks for this course:

        No required textbooks

        DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/professional---personal-d...

        Design Implimentation

        Programming MAX: Structuring Interactive Software for Digital Arts

        Course Offered in Adaptive Mode, Enrollment Open

        COURSE DESCRIPTION

        Max is a powerful platform that accommodates and connects a wide variety of tools for sound, graphics, music and interactivity using a flexible patching and programming environment. Max allows most computer users to write a simple meaningful program within a few minutes, even with limited programming knowledge. But to do something more substantial it's necessary to approach Max as an actual programming language, by taking advantage of its various mechanisms for abstracting program elements into scalable, reusable components that can be combined in increasingly powerful ways.

        This class will not cover every single capability of the language, but instead will focus on key concepts and mechanisms that will allow for tremendous new freedom and possibilities in Max. The class will touch upon:

        • sound and movie playback
        • sound synthesis
        • sound and video effects processing
        • algorithmic composition
        • cross-modal mappings (e.g., video affecting audio and vice versa)
        • interactive control (e.g., from QWERTY keyboard, mouse, USB devices, Open Sound Control)

        Max programming, like most interesting topics, has deep aspects and shallow aspects. This course will largely focus on the deep aspects: principles, concepts, techniques, and theory. If you understand these underlying aspects, your capacity to create in Max will deepen exponentially.

        At the same time, this is not just a theory class. You will also create your own projects using Max. This course will teach the minimum you need to start working on assignments, but mostly I will teach you how to learn or look up the shallow knowledge on your own using Max’s built-in documentation, the Internet, and the Kadenze course forum, as well as how to program your own tests that answer specific questions or reveal potential bugs. Working in this way, you will also develop essential skills and habits that will develop confidence and self-sufficiency, and serve you in the future.

        Instructors

        Matthew Wright, Technical Director of CCRMA
        Dr. Matthew Wright is a media systems designer, improvising composer/musician, and computer music researcher.  He was the Musical Systems Designer at U.C. Berkeley's Center for New Music and Audio Technology (CNMAT) from 1993-2008, and is known for his promotion of the Sound Description Interchange Format (SDIF) and Open Sound Control (OSC) standards, as well as his work with real-time mapping of musical gestures to sound synthesis.  His dissertation at Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) concerned computer modeling of the perception of musical rhythm: "The Shape of an Instant: Measuring and Modeling Perceptual Attack Time with Probability Density Functions."  He spent one year as a visiting research fellow at the University of Victoria on the theme of "Computational Ethnomusicology" developing tools for analysis and visualization of detailed pitch and timing information from musical recordings.  He was the Research Director of UC Santa Barbara's Center for Research in Electronic Arts and Technology (CREATE) for eight years, where he taught classes, advised students, founded and directed the CREATE Ensemble dedicated to research and musical creation with technology in a live performance context, as well as being Principal Development Engineer for the AlloSphere, a 3-story full-surround immersive audiovisual instrument for scientific and artistic research. As a musician, he plays a variety of traditional plucked lutes, Afro-Brazilian percussion, and computer-based instruments of his own design, in both traditional music contexts and experimental new works.

        Guest Lecturer

        David Zicarelli
        David Zicarelli is the founder and CEO of Cycling '74, a software company that maintains and develops the MAX graphical programming environment. The company introduced Max extensions for audio (MSP) in 1997 and video (Jitter) in 2001. Before starting Cycling '74, Zicarelli worked on Max and other interactive music software at Opcode Systems, Intelligent Music, and IRCAM, and earned a doctorate from the Stanford Program in Hearing and Speech Sciences.

        Programming Max: Structuring Interactive Software for Digital Arts from KadenzeOfficial on Vimeo.

        Programming Max Kadenze

        Online Jamming and Concert Technology-Winter 2016

        Date: 
        Thursday, November 19, 2015

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        Course Description

        Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.

        Course Schedule

        Course runs through November 3, 2015 - February 2, 2016

        Session 1Basics And Setup 
        Basics: Network protocols, audio signals + soundcards and network audio.
        Session 2Jacktrip Application + Connection 
        Things that go wrong with Jacktrip: Network & Audio. P2P Sessions and Multi-site setups.
        Session 3Debugging 
        Debug examples of typical problems.
        Session 4Polish And Practice 
        Polish techniques and spawn more practice sessions.
        Session 5Future 
        Future of the art and practice of network audio, alternative platforms for network audio.

        Instructor

        Chris Chafe

          Chris Chafe is a composer, improvisor and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent work includes the Brain Stethoscope project, PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

          Requirements

          Equipment: Computer (Mac or Linux) with installation privileges 

          Software: ChucK, Jacktrip

          Online Jamming and Concert Technology

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