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Design & Creativity

Online Jamming and Concert Technology-Winter 2016

Date: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2015 to Tuesday, February 2, 2016

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Course Description

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.

Course Schedule

Course runs through November 3, 2015 - February 2, 2016

Session 1Basics And Setup 
Basics: Network protocols, audio signals + soundcards and network audio.
Session 2Jacktrip Application + Connection 
Things that go wrong with Jacktrip: Network & Audio. P2P Sessions and Multi-site setups.
Session 3Debugging 
Debug examples of typical problems.
Session 4Polish And Practice 
Polish techniques and spawn more practice sessions.
Session 5Future 
Future of the art and practice of network audio, alternative platforms for network audio.

Instructor

Chris Chafe

    Chris Chafe is a composer, improvisor and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent work includes the Brain Stethoscope project, PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

    Requirements

    Equipment: Computer (Mac or Linux) with installation privileges 

    Software: ChucK, Jacktrip

    Online Jamming and Concert Technology

    Defining the String Quartet: Haydn

    Date: 
    Tuesday, May 17, 2016

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    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The string quartet can be defined in several ways. At the most basic level the musical term refers to the medium of four string instruments: two violins, viola, and violoncello. It can also be used to describe the collective identity of the instrumentalists themselves, in particular established professional ensembles. One such ensemble is the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford University’s celebrated ensemble-in-residence, whose members are featured in this course, performing in Stanford’s 842-seat Bing Concert Hall as well as in that splendid facility’s smaller studio space.

    Thanks to Joseph Haydn, the acknowledged father of the string quartet, the medium evolved into a genre. It is Haydn’s compositions for the medium above all — he composed 68 of them — that established the formal conventions and aesthetic values that secured the string quartet a special status and significance in Western musical culture. As developed by Haydn, the quartet became the preferred vehicle through which composers ever since, from Mozart to John Adams, have honed and displayed their compositional craft.

    Technique and expression go hand in hand. The German poet Goethe described the quartet in terms of a musical conversation. For the audience, Goethe wrote, a quartet performance is like “listening to four rational people conversing among themselves.” Reflecting aesthetic sensibilities commonly associated with the genre in the Enlightenment age of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, the conversation metaphor nicely captures two defining features of the genre: its intimate, personal nature as well as its capacity to convey profound musical thought through the essential ingredients of four-part harmony and counterpoint. And, as Haydn’s compositions amply demonstrate, the medium of the string quartet can also lend itself to the expression of wit and humor.

    This course, in defining the string quartet in these various ways, pays particular attention to Haydn’s towering, history-shaping achievement. In the first part of the course, after providing some general background on the origins of the medium in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century, we look at some examples of early string quartet writing by Allegri, Scarlatti and early-period Haydn. In the second half, because the very essence of the genre resides in musical detail and nuance, we develop the tools for informed listening and appreciation by presenting an in-depth analysis of a single work, Haydn’s String Quartet in F minor, opus 20, no. 5 from 1772. With frequent musical illustrations by the St. Lawrence Quartet, we explore the F-minor Quartet in terms of three complementary concepts: form, language, and gesture.

    In a concluding section we analyze the final movement, comparing Haydn’s use of the compositional technique known as “fugue” to other fugues by Bach, Handel and Mozart. By means of this “learned style,” we argue, the composer connects his musical language to ecclesiastical traditions, just as the movement’s rhetorical character reflects his penchant for musical effects drawn from the world of opera. The aesthetic spheres of the chamber, church and theater converge. Haydn thus defines his watershed opus — in microcosm — as something at once intimate, recondite and playful.

    PREREQUISITES

    Defining the String Quartet is designed to appeal to participants with different musical backgrounds and levels of musical literacy. The ability to read music is not required, although we do supply musical notation for those of you who wish to follow along, and have developed some technology to help you do that: instead of being displayed in the usual black, the notes being played are highlighted on screen in red. Intended as tests of comprehension and knowledge, the quizzes are offered in two degrees of difficulty, indicated thus: ♪ (entry-level) and ♪♪ (advanced). We hope you enjoy the course!

    COURSE STAFF

    Stephen Hinton

    Stephen Hinton is the Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of German Studies at Stanford University. Since coming to Stanford in 1994, he has held the positions of chair of the Department of Music, Senior Associate Dean for Humanities and Arts, and, most recently, Denning Family Director of the Stanford Arts Institute. A leading authority on the composer Kurt Weill, he has published widely on many aspects of modern German music history, with contributions to publications such as Cambridge Opera Handbooks, Handwörterbuch der musikalischen Terminologie,New Grove Dictionary of Opera, New Grove Dictionary of Music,Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, and Funkkolleg Musikgeschichte. He has also served as editor of the journal Beethoven Forum. His most recent book, Weill’s Musical Theater: Stages of Reform (University of California Press: Berkeley, 2012), the first musicological study of Weill’s complete stage works, received the 2013 Kurt Weill Book Prize for outstanding scholarship in music theater since 1900. He is an avid amateur chamber musician who regrets having too little time to practice his two instruments (viola and piano).

    St. Lawrence String Quartet

    The St. Lawrence String Quartet (SLSQ) enters its second quarter century of growth and worldwide concert-giving with acclaim from audiences, critics and the music community alike. “It's a modern string quartet that brings flexibility, dramatic fire and a hint of rock 'n' roll energy,” writes the Los Angeles Times. “Player for player, this is a superb group,” writes the New York Times...“[conveying] the excitement of playing whatever is on their stands at the moment.”

    In recent seasons, the SLSQ has made a specialty of the 68 string quartets of Joseph Haydn. In the Quartet's opinion, the true genius of Haydn often suffers from a formulaic and glossed-over familiarity on concert programs. In response, the SLSQ's interpretations of Haydn lay down a new standard for gripping, tender, hilarious, wicked, and charming performances of these masterpieces. The SLSQ often performs “Haydn Discovery” programs, which provide audiences with an engaging guided tour through the moment-to-moment architecture of his quartets to encourage active listening. A recording of Haydn's Symphony no. 102 (in its crisp arrangement for chamber ensemble by Salomon) has recently been released by the SLSQ, and a recording of the six groundbreaking quartets of Op. 20 is expected to be completed in 2016.

    Violinist Geoff Nuttall and violist Lesley Robertson founded the quartet in Canada in 1989. Cellist Christopher Costanza joined the group in 2003, and violinist Owen Dalby is the most recent member. With its appointment as faculty members in the Department of Music and as ensemble-in-residence at Stanford University for almost two decades, the SLSQ is deeply involved in teaching musicians from all academic backgrounds and disciplines. Its seminars, masterclasses and interdisciplinary collaborations attract students from around the world. Cultivating a wide repertoire that embraces the great works of the classical literature, off-the-beaten-path composers, and new works (often written specially for the group), the SLSQ continues to engage with audiences in over one hundred concerts a year. In the words of Alex Ross of The New Yorker: "The St. Lawrence are remarkable not simply for the quality of their music making, exalted as it is, but for the joy they take in the act of connection."

    For further information about the SLSQ and its members, see the Quartet's homepage at www.slsq.com.

    Victoria Chang

    Victoria Chang is a graduate student in musicology at Stanford University with interests ranging from 20th-century genres such as electronic dance music, experimental jazz and new media to the sacred vocal music of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Her dissertation explores representations of loneliness and lyric expression in operas and melodramas of the early 20th century. She conducts several small vocal ensembles and is a freelance musician specializing in site-specific works.

    FAQ: 

    Do I need to buy a textbook?

    No. All of the required course materials (lectures, musical examples, digital scores, and performances by the St. Lawrence String Quartet) are included here online.

    Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment?

    Yes. Each of the given exercises is marked with its point value; the maximum score for the whole course is 132 points. Participants who earn at least 50 points will be eligible for a Statement of Accomplishment marked ♪, for "Entry Level." Participants who earn at least 80 points will be eligible for a Statement of Accomplishment marked ♪♪, for "Advanced."

    How much time can I expect to spend on the course each week?

    This is a self-paced course. Although it is recommended that you work through the materials in the prescribed sequence from start to finish, you may study and review the lessons, listen to the performances, and do the exercises at your own chosen speed.

    St. Lawrence String Quartet

    Physics-based Sound Synthesis for Games and Interactive Systems

    Date: 
    Wednesday, March 2, 2016 to Wednesday, August 31, 2016

    About the Course

    This course introduces the basics of Digital Signal Processing and computational acoustics, motivated by the vibrational physics of real-world objects and systems. We will build from a simple mass-spring and pendulum to demonstrate oscillation, learn how to simulate those systems in the computer, and also prove that these simple oscillations behave as a sine wave. From that we move to plucked strings and struck bars, showing both solutions as combined traveling waves and combined sine wave harmonics. We continue to build and simulate more complex systems containing many vibrating objects and resonators (stringed instruments, drum, plate), and also learn how to simulate echos and room reverberation. Through this process, we will learn about digital signals, filters, oscillators, harmonics, spectral analysis, linear and non-linear systems, particle models, and all the necessary building blocks to synthesize essentially any sound. The free open-source software provided will make it possible for anyone to use physical models in their art-making, game or movie sound, or any other application.

    SCHEDULE *

    Course runs until August 31, 2016

    Session 1: The Time Domain: Sound, Digital Audio, PCM Files, Noise Vs. Pitch, A Hint Of Spectra 
    a) Sound in Air, Traveling Waves b) Digital Audio, Sampling, Quantization, Aliasing c) Soundfiles, Wavetables, Manipulating PCM d) Pitch (vs. Noise), Spectral Analysis 0.1 e) Time-domain Pitch/Noise Detection: ZeroXings, AMDF, Autocorrelation
    Session 2: Physics, Oscillators, Sines & Spectra, Spectral/Additive Synthesis 
    a) Mass-Spring-Damper system, also simple Pendulum b) Fourier analysis/synthesis, Spectrum Analysis 1.0 c) More on additive Sine-wave synthesis
    Session 3: Digital Filters, Modal Synthesis 
    a) Digital Filters, Finite Impulse Response (FIR) b) Linearity, Time-invariance, Convolution c) Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) Digital Filters d) BiQuad Resonator Filter, Modal Synthesis
    Session 4: Physical Modeling Synthesis: 1D Systems 
    a) 1-D systems, Strings, Modal (Fourier) Solution b) Strings II: Waveguide (D’Alembert) Solution c) 1-D systems, Bars, Tubes, solutions d) Advanced Waveguide Synthesis for 1-D systems
    Session 5: Physical Modeling II: 2 And 3-D Systems 
    a) 2-D systems, plates, drums, higher-order modes Fourier (Sine and/or Modal) Solutions, Waveguide Solutions b) 3-D systems, rooms, resonators, Meshes, Waveguides c) Resonator/Modal view and solution of 3-D systems Pop bottles and other lumped resonators
    Session 6: Subtractive Synthesis, Vocal Sounds And Models 
    a)  Subtractive Synthesis, Voice Synthesis, Formants b) Linear Prediction, LPC c) FOFs d) FM Synthesis: Horns, Bells, Voices
    Session 7: Grains, Particles And Statistical Models 
    a) Wavelets b) Granular Synthesis c) Particle Models, Statistical Modal Synthesis d) Wind, Water, Surf, and Other Whooshing Sounds
    Session 8: Extending And Refining Physical Synthesis Models 
    a) Waveshaping Synthesis, Distortion Modeling b) Time-Varying Systems c) Stiffness, All-Pass Filters, Banded Waveguides d) Commuted Synthesis e) JULIUS on KS, strings, demos
    Session 9: Tying It All Together: Applications, Sonification, Interactions, And Control 
    a) Scanned Synthesis b)  Don’t forget the laptop!!! SMELT:   c) Controlling Synthesis with game controllers (Wii, mobile TouchOSC, more) d) Walking Synthesis, a complete system e) Procedural Audio: Driving synthesis from process, game state, etc. f) Data set Sonification
    * This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

    What you need to take this course:

    • Software: ChucK (also optionally STK, PeRColate for Max/MSP, Processing, GL/Glut)

    Recommended (highly) Textbook:

    • Operating system: Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux (Planet CCRMA recommended)
    • Desired: familiarity with algebra. no calculus required.
    • Helpful to have: some personal sound-making things: a guitar or other stringed instrument, a drum, a kitchen pan, a prayer bowl, glasses, bowls, voice...

    COURSE INSTRUCTORS

    Perry Cook

      Perry R. Cook is Emeritus Professor of Computer Science (also Music) at Princeton University, founding advisor/consultant to social music company SMule, and consulting professor at CalArts, Stanford CCRMA. With Dan Trueman, he co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which received a MacArthur Digital Learning Initiative Grant in 2005. With Ge Wang, Cook is co-author of the ChucK Programming Language. His newest book is “Programming for Digital Musicians and Artists,” with Ajay Kapur, Spencer Salazar, and Ge Wang. The recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cook is (still) working on a new book, "La Bella Voce e La Macchina (the Beautiful Voice and the Machine), A History of Technology and the Expressive Voice." Perry is also co-founder of Kadenze.

      Julius Smith

        Julius O. Smith normally teaches a music signal-processing course sequence and supervises related research at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is formally a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering. In 1975, he received his BS/EE degree from Rice University, where he got started in the field of digital signal processing and modeling for control. In 1983, he received the PhD/EE degree from Stanford University, specializing in techniques for digital filter design and system identification, with application to violin modeling. His work history includes the Signal Processing Department at Electromagnetic Systems Laboratories, Inc., working on systems for digital communications, the Adaptive Systems Department at Systems Control Technology, Inc., working on research problems in adaptive filtering and spectral estimation, and NeXT Computer, Inc., where he was responsible for sound, music, and signal processing software for the NeXT computer workstation. Prof. Smith is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He is the author of four online books and numerous research publications in his field.

        Physics Based Sound Synthesis

        The Geology and Wines of California and France

        Date: 
        Monday, January 11, 2016

        Course Description

        This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and with comparative tastings form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not. As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result. The wines we will taste will be comparable from both Old World (France) and New World (California) wineries: chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, Bordeaux and Bordeauxstyle blends, and Rhone and Rhone-varietal blends. 

        In order to participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes and discuss aspects of terroir, winemaking styles, flavor characteristics, etc. 

        Please be aware that some of the optional activities in this course include the consumption of alcohol. Students enrolling in this course must be either: at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

        Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million-year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2016 catalogue (available in February 2016). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

        The Geology and Wines of California and France

        Online Jamming and Concert Technology-Spring 2016

        Date: 
        Sunday, April 19, 2015

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        Course Description

        Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.

        Course Schedule

        Course runs through November 3, 2015 - February 2, 2016

        Session 1Basics And Setup 
        Basics: Network protocols, audio signals + soundcards and network audio.
        Session 2Jacktrip Application + Connection 
        Things that go wrong with Jacktrip: Network & Audio. P2P Sessions and Multi-site setups.
        Session 3Debugging 
        Debug examples of typical problems.
        Session 4Polish And Practice 
        Polish techniques and spawn more practice sessions.
        Session 5Future 
        Future of the art and practice of network audio, alternative platforms for network audio.

        Instructor

        Chris Chafe, Professor of Music and Director of CCRMA

          Chris Chafe is a composer, improviser, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance, and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent work includes the Brain Stethoscope project, PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

          Requirements

          Equipment: Computer (Mac or Linux) with installation privileges 

          Software: ChucK, Jacktrip

          Online Jamming and Concert Technology

          Physics-Based Sound Synthesis for Games and Interactive Systems

          Date: 
          Friday, October 16, 2015 to Monday, February 1, 2016

          Course Description

          This course introduces the basics of Digital Signal Processing and computational acoustics, motivated by the vibrational physics of real-world objects and systems. We will build from a simple mass-spring and pendulum to demonstrate oscillation, how to simulate those systems in the computer, and also prove that simple oscillation behaves as a sine wave. From that we move to plucked strings and struck bars, showing both solutions as combined traveling waves and combined sine wave harmonics. We continue to build and simulate more complex systems containing many vibrating objects and resonators (mandolin, drum, plate), and also learn how to simulate echos and room reverberation.  Through this process,  we will learn about digital signals, filters, oscillators, harmonics, spectral analysis, linear and non-linear systems, particle models, and all the necessary building blocks to synthesize essentially any sound. The free open-source software provided make it possible for anyone to use physical models in their art-making, game or movie sound, or any other application.

          Schedule

          Session 1: The Time Domain: Sound, Digital Audio, PCM Files, Noise Vs. Pitch, A Hint Of Spectra 
          a) Sound in Air, Traveling Waves b) Digital Audio, Sampling, Quantization, Aliasing c) Soundfiles, Wavetables, Manipulating PCM d) Pitch (vs. Noise), Spectral Analysis 0.1 e) Time-domain Pitch/Noise Detection: ZeroXings, AMDF, Autocorrelation
          Session 2: Physics, Oscillators, Sines & Spectra, Spectral/Additive Synthesis 
          a) Mass-Spring-Damper system, also simple Pendulum b) Fourier analysis/synthesis, Spectrum Analysis 1.0 c) More on additive Sine-wave synthesis
          Session 3: Digital Filters, Modal Synthesis 
          a) Digital Filters, Finite Impulse Response (FIR) b) Linearity, Time-invariance, Convolution c) Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) Digital Filters d) BiQuad Resonator Filter, Modal Synthesis
          Session 4: Physical Modeling Synthesis: 1D Systems 
          a) 1-D systems, Strings, Modal (Fourier) Solution b) Strings II: Waveguide (D’Alembert) Solution c) 1-D systems, Bars, Tubes, solutions d) Advanced Waveguide Synthesis for 1-D systems
          Session 5: Physical Modeling II: 2 And 3-D Systems 
          a) 2-D systems, plates, drums, higher-order modes Fourier (Sine and/or Modal) Solutions, Waveguide Solutions b) 3-D systems, rooms, resonators, Meshes, Waveguide synthesis c) Resonator/Modal view and solution of 3-D systems Pop bottles and other lumped resonators
          Session 6: Subtractive Synthesis, Vocal Sounds And Models 
          a)  Subtractive Synthesis, Voice Synthesis, Formants b) Linear Prediction, LPC c) FOFs d) FM Synthesis: Horns, Bells, Voices
          Session 7: Grains, Particles And Statistical Models 
          a) Wavelets (just for completeness) b) Granular Synthesis c) Particle Models, Statistical Modal Synthesis d) Wind, Water, Surf, and Other Whooshing Sounds
          Session 8: Extending And Refining Physical Synthesis Models 
          a) Waveshaping Synthesis, Distortion Modeling b) Time-Varying Systems c) Stiffness, All-Pass Filters, Banded Waveguides d) Commuted Synthesis e) JULIUS on KS, strings, demos
          Session 9: Tying It All Together: Applications, Sonification, Interactions, And Control 
          a) Scanned Synthesis b)  Don’t forget the laptop!!! SMELT:   c) Controlling Synthesis with game controllers (Wii, mobile TouchOSC, more) d) Walking Synthesis, a complete system e) Procedural Audio: Driving synthesis from process, game state, etc. f) Data set Sonification

          What you need to take this course:

          • Software: ChucK (also optionally STK, PeRColate for Max/MSP, Processing, GL/Glut)
          • Recommended (highly) Textbook:

          Real Sound Synthesis for Interactive Applications (Kadenze discount available soon!)

          • Familiarity with ChucK programming language

          Introduction to Programming for Musicians and Digital Artists (Kadenze ChucK course)

          Programming for Musicians and Digital Artists (ChucK book, Kadenze Discount)

          • Operating system: Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux (Planet CCRMA recommended)
          • Desired: familiarity with algebra. no calculus required.
          • Helpful to have: some personal sound-making things: a guitar or other stringed instrument, a drum, a kitchen pan, a prayer bowl, glasses, bowls, voice...

          Instructors:

          Perry Cook

            Perry R. Cook is Emeritus Professor of Computer Science (also Music) at Princeton University, founding advisor/consultant to social music company SMule, and consulting professor at CalArts, Stanford CCRMA, and University of Arizona. With Dan Trueman, he co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which received a MacArthur Digital Learning Initiative Grant in 2005. With Ge Wang, Cook is co-author of the ChucK Programming Language. His newest book is “Programming for Digital Musicians and Artists,” with Ajay Kapur, Spencer Salazar, and Ge Wang. The recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cook is (still) working on a new book, "La Bella Voce e La Macchina (the Beautiful Voice and the Machine), A History of Technology and the Expressive Voice." Perry is also co-founder of Kadenze.

            Julius Smith

              Julius O. Smith normally teaches a music signal-processing course sequence and supervises related research at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is formally a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering. In 1975, he received his BS/EE degree from Rice University, where he got started in the field of digital signal processing and modeling for control. In 1983, he received the PhD/EE degree from Stanford University, specializing in techniques for digital filter design and system identification, with application to violin modeling. His work history includes the Signal Processing Department at Electromagnetic Systems Laboratories, Inc., working on systems for digital communications, the Adaptive Systems Department at Systems Control Technology, Inc., working on research problems in adaptive filtering and spectral estimation, and NeXT Computer, Inc., where he was responsible for sound, music, and signal processing software for the NeXT computer workstation. Prof. Smith is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He is the author of four online books and numerous research publications in his field.

              Physics Based Sound Synthesis

              Audio Signal Processing for Music Applications

              Date: 
              Monday, September 21, 2015 to Thursday, January 7, 2016

              About the Course

              Audio signal processing is an engineering field that focuses on the computational methods for intentionally altering sounds, methods that are used in many musical applications.

              We have tried to put together a course that can be of interest and accessible to people coming from diverse backgrounds while going deep into several signal processing topics. We focus on the spectral processing techniques of relevance for the description and transformation of sounds, developing the basic theoretical and practical knowledge with which to analyze, synthesize, transform and describe audio signals in the context of music applications. 

              The course is based on open software and content. The demonstrations and programming exercises are done using Python under Ubuntu, and the references and materials for the course come from open online repositories. We are also distributing with open licenses the software and materials developed for the course.

              Course Syllabus

              Week 1: Introduction; basic mathematics 
              Week 2: Discrete Fourier transform
              Week 3: Fourier transform properties
              Week 4: Short-time Fourier transform
              Week 5: Sinusoidal model
              Week 6: Harmonic model
              Week 7: Sinusoidal plus residual modeling
              Week 8: Sound transformations
              Week 9: Sound/music description
              Week 10: Concluding topics; beyond audio signal processing

              Recommended Background

              The course assumes some basic background in mathematics and signal processing. Also, since the assignments are done with the programming language Python, some software programming background in any language is most helpful. 

              Suggested Readings

              The main software tools used are in https://github.com/MTG/sms-tools and the sounds to be studied come from https://freesound.org. Most of the external references come from Julius O Smith website, https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos, or from https://www.wikipedia.org.

              Course Format

              Each week is structured around 6 types of activities:

              • Theory: video lectures covering the core signal processing concepts.   
              • Demos: video lectures presenting tools and examples that complement the theory.
              • Programming: video lectures introducing the needed programming skills (using Python) to implement the techniques described in the theory. 
              • Quiz: questionnaire to review the concepts covered. 
              • Assignment: programming exercises to implement and use the methodologies presented. 
              • Advanced topics: videos and written documents that extend the topics covered.

              FAQ

              • How much programming background is needed for the course?
                All the assignments start from some existing Python code that the student will have to understand and modify. Some programming experience is necessary.

              • Do I need to buy a textbook for the course?
                No, it is self-contained.

              • What resources will I need for this class?
                All the materials and tools for the class are available online under open licences.

              • What is the coolest thing I'll learn if I take this class?
                You will play around with sounds a lot, analysing them, transforming them, and making interesting new sounds.

              • Will I earn a Statement of Accomplishment for completing this course?
                Yes you will earn an Statement of Accomplishment if you do well in the course.

              Bringing Your Presentation to Life

              Date: 
              Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, July 31, 2015

              COURSE DESCRIPTION

              Everyone agrees that most presentations have room for improvement. But how does one move beyond the dreaded slide show of bulleted lists? What skills and techniques are needed to create a vivid and memorable slide deck? And, how can anyone do this when pressed for time? 

              This overview will help you break out of using the traditional PowerPoint template and deliver memorable messages to your audience. You will explore three major areas of presentation design and delivery: organizing your information, using graphic design elements with the appropriate technological tools, and connecting with your audience by understanding the performance aspects of presentation. In the first part of this hands-on online course, we will explore these elements in small-group exercises. In the second half, each student will create, deliver, receive, and incorporate feedback on a three-minute presentation. With extensive time for rehearsing and integrating feedback, you will leave with both a process and a repertoire of skills that can be used in any communication setting. - See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

              Course Staff

              Carolyn Gale, Founder, Elevator Talk

              Carolyn Gale has taught researchers and technical experts across four continents how to communicate their work to nonspecialized audiences. Earlier, she co-founded Clear Communication Group and was director of Stanford’s Research Communication Program. She is also a co-founder of PresentationCamp, community-driven conferences that focus on creating compelling presentations. She received an MS in Instructional Technology from Vanderbilt.

              DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

              Presentation_Continuing_Studies

              Coen Country: The Coen Brothers and Film History

              Date: 
              Monday, April 27, 2015 to Friday, June 5, 2015
              Fee Applies.
              This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

              COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

              This course invites students on a tour of the films of the Coen Brothers, from their first film, Blood Simple, to Fargo and beyond. Each week we will view a Coen film, along with a film classic that influenced it directly or indirectly, so that the Coens’ use of cinema history and Hollywood conventions will be given context and depth. Watching The Big Sleep alongside The Big Lebowski, and Double Indemnity with The Man Who Wasn’t There, students will understand and appreciate how the Coens use and stretch the crime genre and make brilliant fun of film noir, while at the same time paying homage to the great directors Howard Hawks and Billy Wilder. Equally illuminating is a double bill of Preston Sturges’sSullivan’s Travels and the Coens’ Depression-era O Brother, Where Art Thou?, a contemporary take on Sturges’s unusual approach to comedy. How these films “talk to each other” across the decades becomes a way into learning both about Hollywood pictures and genres and about the Coens’ irreverent takes on the classics. Instructor lectures, assigned viewings and readings, and group discussions will connect with the films of the week. Students will keep and share a “viewing notebook” containing their own reflections, observations, and quotations. All films can be purchased or rented on DVD and most can be rented or streamed instantly through Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play Movies, and other online providers.

              This is an online course. Thanks to the flexibility of the online format, this course can be taken anywhere, anytime—a plus for students who lead busy lives or for whom regular travel to the Stanford campus is not possible. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions.

              J.M. Tyree, Film Critic; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

              J.M. Tyree is the co-author of BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski, and the author of BFI Film Classics: Salesman. His newest book, Our Secret Life in the Movies (with Michael McGriff), was named an NPR Best Book of 2014. He is an associate editor at the New England Review.

              Textbooks for this course:

              (Required) William Rodney Allen, The Coen Brothers: Interviews (Conversations with Filmmakers) (ISBN 978-1578068890)
              (Required) J. M. Tyree and Ben Walters, BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski (ISBN 978-1844571734)

              DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20143_FLM-109-W#sth...

              Stanford Innovation at Work

              Date: 
              Thursday, October 23, 2014
              Course topic: 

              This dynamic program offers your team a unique opportunity to master the art—and science—of design thinking and use it to address challenges specific to your work. In these workshops, Stanford's d.school's Perry Klebahn and Jeremy Utley will lead your team through a series of exercises and activities that will get you out of your chairs and working together to apply design thinking to real projects and do it now. Participants are encouraged to get out of their chairs and on their feet—take risks, try new behaviors—and work together to generate creative solutions. 

              Overview

              Get your team into the "Innovation at Work" mindset! In this workshop, Perry and Jeremy will show you some valuable techniques and approaches to generate new ideas, and lots of them.

              You won't just be listening to them talk through examples and demonstrate how to use them. You and your team will be on your feet, post-its and markers in hand, as Jeremy and Perry help you apply 4 key tools to your projects in real time:

              • "Yes and..." to defer judgment and build on each other
              • Constraints to generate volume
              • Analogous situations to take you to new territory
              • Selection criteria to choose the ideas you will take forward

              By the end of this session, you will have a reserve of viable ideas ready for prototyping.

              Instructors

              FAQ: 

              This program is available for faciliation at work.

              Fees apply.

              Stanford Innovation at Work

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