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Design & Creativity

Date: 
Friday, October 16, 2015 to Monday, February 1, 2016
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Course Description

This course introduces the basics of Digital Signal Processing and computational acoustics, motivated by the vibrational physics of real-world objects and systems. We will build from a simple mass-spring and pendulum to demonstrate oscillation, how to simulate those systems in the computer, and also prove that simple oscillation behaves as a sine wave. From that we move to plucked strings and struck bars, showing both solutions as combined traveling waves and combined sine wave harmonics. We continue to build and simulate more complex systems containing many vibrating objects and resonators (mandolin, drum, plate), and also learn how to simulate echos and room reverberation.  Through this process,  we will learn about digital signals, filters, oscillators, harmonics, spectral analysis, linear and non-linear systems, particle models, and all the necessary building blocks to synthesize essentially any sound. The free open-source software provided make it possible for anyone to use physical models in their art-making, game or movie sound, or any other application.

Schedule

Session 1: The Time Domain: Sound, Digital Audio, PCM Files, Noise Vs. Pitch, A Hint Of Spectra 
a) Sound in Air, Traveling Waves b) Digital Audio, Sampling, Quantization, Aliasing c) Soundfiles, Wavetables, Manipulating PCM d) Pitch (vs. Noise), Spectral Analysis 0.1 e) Time-domain Pitch/Noise Detection: ZeroXings, AMDF, Autocorrelation
 
Session 2: Physics, Oscillators, Sines & Spectra, Spectral/Additive Synthesis 
a) Mass-Spring-Damper system, also simple Pendulum b) Fourier analysis/synthesis, Spectrum Analysis 1.0 c) More on additive Sine-wave synthesis
 
Session 3: Digital Filters, Modal Synthesis 
a) Digital Filters, Finite Impulse Response (FIR) b) Linearity, Time-invariance, Convolution c) Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) Digital Filters d) BiQuad Resonator Filter, Modal Synthesis
 
Session 4: Physical Modeling Synthesis: 1D Systems 
a) 1-D systems, Strings, Modal (Fourier) Solution b) Strings II: Waveguide (D’Alembert) Solution c) 1-D systems, Bars, Tubes, solutions d) Advanced Waveguide Synthesis for 1-D systems
 
Session 5: Physical Modeling II: 2 And 3-D Systems 
a) 2-D systems, plates, drums, higher-order modes Fourier (Sine and/or Modal) Solutions, Waveguide Solutions b) 3-D systems, rooms, resonators, Meshes, Waveguide synthesis c) Resonator/Modal view and solution of 3-D systems Pop bottles and other lumped resonators
 
Session 6: Subtractive Synthesis, Vocal Sounds And Models 
a)  Subtractive Synthesis, Voice Synthesis, Formants b) Linear Prediction, LPC c) FOFs d) FM Synthesis: Horns, Bells, Voices
Session 7: Grains, Particles And Statistical Models 
a) Wavelets (just for completeness) b) Granular Synthesis c) Particle Models, Statistical Modal Synthesis d) Wind, Water, Surf, and Other Whooshing Sounds
 
Session 8: Extending And Refining Physical Synthesis Models 
a) Waveshaping Synthesis, Distortion Modeling b) Time-Varying Systems c) Stiffness, All-Pass Filters, Banded Waveguides d) Commuted Synthesis e) JULIUS on KS, strings, demos
 
Session 9: Tying It All Together: Applications, Sonification, Interactions, And Control 
a) Scanned Synthesis b)  Don’t forget the laptop!!! SMELT:   c) Controlling Synthesis with game controllers (Wii, mobile TouchOSC, more) d) Walking Synthesis, a complete system e) Procedural Audio: Driving synthesis from process, game state, etc. f) Data set Sonification

What you need to take this course

  • Software: ChucK (also optionally STK, PeRColate for Max/MSP, Processing, GL/Glut)
  • Recommended (highly) Textbook:

Real Sound Synthesis for Interactive Applications (Kadenze discount available soon!)

  • Familiarity with ChucK programming language

Introduction to Programming for Musicians and Digital Artists (Kadenze ChucK course)

Programming for Musicians and Digital Artists (ChucK book, Kadenze Discount)

  • Operating system: Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux (Planet CCRMA recommended)
  • Desired: familiarity with algebra. no calculus required.
  • Helpful to have: some personal sound-making things: a guitar or other stringed instrument, a drum, a kitchen pan, a prayer bowl, glasses, bowls, voice...

Instructors

Perry Cook

    Perry R. Cook is Emeritus Professor of Computer Science (also Music) at Princeton University, founding advisor/consultant to social music company SMule, and consulting professor at CalArts, Stanford CCRMA, and University of Arizona. With Dan Trueman, he co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which received a MacArthur Digital Learning Initiative Grant in 2005. With Ge Wang, Cook is co-author of the ChucK Programming Language. His newest book is “Programming for Digital Musicians and Artists,” with Ajay Kapur, Spencer Salazar, and Ge Wang. The recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cook is (still) working on a new book, "La Bella Voce e La Macchina (the Beautiful Voice and the Machine), A History of Technology and the Expressive Voice." Perry is also co-founder of Kadenze.

    Julius Smith

      Julius O. Smith normally teaches a music signal-processing course sequence and supervises related research at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is formally a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering. In 1975, he received his BS/EE degree from Rice University, where he got started in the field of digital signal processing and modeling for control. In 1983, he received the PhD/EE degree from Stanford University, specializing in techniques for digital filter design and system identification, with application to violin modeling. His work history includes the Signal Processing Department at Electromagnetic Systems Laboratories, Inc., working on systems for digital communications, the Adaptive Systems Department at Systems Control Technology, Inc., working on research problems in adaptive filtering and spectral estimation, and NeXT Computer, Inc., where he was responsible for sound, music, and signal processing software for the NeXT computer workstation. Prof. Smith is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He is the author of four online books and numerous research publications in his field.

       

      Physics Based Sound Synthesis

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      Date: 
      Monday, September 21, 2015 to Thursday, January 7, 2016
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      About the Course

      Audio signal processing is an engineering field that focuses on the computational methods for intentionally altering sounds, methods that are used in many musical applications.

      We have tried to put together a course that can be of interest and accessible to people coming from diverse backgrounds while going deep into several signal processing topics. We focus on the spectral processing techniques of relevance for the description and transformation of sounds, developing the basic theoretical and practical knowledge with which to analyze, synthesize, transform and describe audio signals in the context of music applications. 

      The course is based on open software and content. The demonstrations and programming exercises are done using Python under Ubuntu, and the references and materials for the course come from open online repositories. We are also distributing with open licenses the software and materials developed for the course.

      Course Syllabus

      Week 1: Introduction; basic mathematics 
      Week 2: Discrete Fourier transform

      Week 3: Fourier transform properties
      Week 4: Short-time Fourier transform
      Week 5: Sinusoidal model
      Week 6: Harmonic model
      Week 7: Sinusoidal plus residual modeling
      Week 8: Sound transformations
      Week 9: Sound/music description
      Week 10: Concluding topics; beyond audio signal processing

      Recommended Background

      The course assumes some basic background in mathematics and signal processing. Also, since the assignments are done with the programming language Python, some software programming background in any language is most helpful. 

      Suggested Readings

      The main software tools used are in https://github.com/MTG/sms-tools and the sounds to be studied come from https://freesound.org. Most of the external references come from Julius O Smith website, https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos, or from https://www.wikipedia.org.

      Course Format

      Each week is structured around 6 types of activities:

      • Theory: video lectures covering the core signal processing concepts.   
      • Demos: video lectures presenting tools and examples that complement the theory.
      • Programming: video lectures introducing the needed programming skills (using Python) to implement the techniques described in the theory. 
      • Quiz: questionnaire to review the concepts covered. 
      • Assignment: programming exercises to implement and use the methodologies presented. 
      • Advanced topics: videos and written documents that extend the topics covered.

      FAQ

      • How much programming background is needed for the course?
        All the assignments start from some existing Python code that the student will have to understand and modify. Some programming experience is necessary.

      • Do I need to buy a textbook for the course?
        No, it is self-contained.

      • What resources will I need for this class?
        All the materials and tools for the class are available online under open licences.

      • What is the coolest thing I'll learn if I take this class?
        You will play around with sounds a lot, analysing them, transforming them, and making interesting new sounds.

      • Will I earn a Statement of Accomplishment for completing this course?
        Yes you will earn an Statement of Accomplishment if you do well in the course.

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      Date: 
      Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, July 31, 2015
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      COURSE DESCRIPTION

      Everyone agrees that most presentations have room for improvement. But how does one move beyond the dreaded slide show of bulleted lists? What skills and techniques are needed to create a vivid and memorable slide deck? And, how can anyone do this when pressed for time? 

      This overview will help you break out of using the traditional PowerPoint template and deliver memorable messages to your audience. You will explore three major areas of presentation design and delivery: organizing your information, using graphic design elements with the appropriate technological tools, and connecting with your audience by understanding the performance aspects of presentation. In the first part of this hands-on online course, we will explore these elements in small-group exercises. In the second half, each student will create, deliver, receive, and incorporate feedback on a three-minute presentation. With extensive time for rehearsing and integrating feedback, you will leave with both a process and a repertoire of skills that can be used in any communication setting. - See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sthash.gdglRgY5.dpuf

      Course Staff

      Carolyn Gale, Founder, Elevator Talk

      Carolyn Gale has taught researchers and technical experts across four continents how to communicate their work to nonspecialized audiences. Earlier, she co-founded Clear Communication Group and was director of Stanford’s Research Communication Program. She is also a co-founder of PresentationCamp, community-driven conferences that focus on creating compelling presentations. She received an MS in Instructional Technology from Vanderbilt.

      DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sthash.gdglRgY5.dpuf

      Presentation_Continuing_Studies

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      Date: 
      Monday, April 27, 2015 to Friday, June 5, 2015
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      Fee Applies.

      This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

      COURSE DESCRIPTION

      This course invites students on a tour of the films of the Coen Brothers, from their first film, Blood Simple, to Fargo and beyond. Each week we will view a Coen film, along with a film classic that influenced it directly or indirectly, so that the Coens’ use of cinema history and Hollywood conventions will be given context and depth. Watching The Big Sleep alongside The Big Lebowski, and Double Indemnity with The Man Who Wasn’t There, students will understand and appreciate how the Coens use and stretch the crime genre and make brilliant fun of film noir, while at the same time paying homage to the great directors Howard Hawks and Billy Wilder. Equally illuminating is a double bill of Preston Sturges’sSullivan’s Travels and the Coens’ Depression-era O Brother, Where Art Thou?, a contemporary take on Sturges’s unusual approach to comedy. How these films “talk to each other” across the decades becomes a way into learning both about Hollywood pictures and genres and about the Coens’ irreverent takes on the classics. Instructor lectures, assigned viewings and readings, and group discussions will connect with the films of the week. Students will keep and share a “viewing notebook” containing their own reflections, observations, and quotations. All films can be purchased or rented on DVD and most can be rented or streamed instantly through Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play Movies, and other online providers.

      This is an online course. Thanks to the flexibility of the online format, this course can be taken anywhere, anytime—a plus for students who lead busy lives or for whom regular travel to the Stanford campus is not possible. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions.

      J.M. Tyree, Film Critic; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

      J.M. Tyree is the co-author of BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski, and the author of BFI Film Classics: Salesman. His newest book, Our Secret Life in the Movies (with Michael McGriff), was named an NPR Best Book of 2014. He is an associate editor at the New England Review.

      Textbooks for this course

      (Required) William Rodney Allen, The Coen Brothers: Interviews (Conversations with Filmmakers) (ISBN 978-1578068890)
      (Required) J. M. Tyree and Ben Walters, BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski (ISBN 978-1844571734)

       

      DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20143_FLM-109-W#sthash.R4i93efy.dpuf


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      Date: 
      Thursday, October 23, 2014
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      Course topic: 

      This dynamic program offers your team a unique opportunity to master the art—and science—of design thinking and use it to address challenges specific to your work. In these workshops, Stanford's d.school's Perry Klebahn and Jeremy Utley will lead your team through a series of exercises and activities that will get you out of your chairs and working together to apply design thinking to real projects and do it now. Participants are encouraged to get out of their chairs and on their feet—take risks, try new behaviors—and work together to generate creative solutions. 

      Overview

      Get your team into the "Innovation at Work" mindset! In this workshop, Perry and Jeremy will show you some valuable techniques and approaches to generate new ideas, and lots of them.

      You won't just be listening to them talk through examples and demonstrate how to use them. You and your team will be on your feet, post-its and markers in hand, as Jeremy and Perry help you apply 4 key tools to your projects in real time:

      • "Yes and..." to defer judgment and build on each other
      • Constraints to generate volume
      • Analogous situations to take you to new territory
      • Selection criteria to choose the ideas you will take forward

      By the end of this session, you will have a reserve of viable ideas ready for prototyping.

      Instructors

       
       
      FAQ: 

      This program is available for faciliation at work.

      Fees apply.

      Stanford Innovation at Work

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      Date: 
      Wednesday, October 1, 2014 to Friday, December 19, 2014
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      About the Course

      Audio signal processing is an engineering field that focuses on the computational methods for intentionally altering sounds, methods that are used in many musical applications.

      We have tried to put together a course that can be of interest and accessible to people coming from diverse backgrounds while going deep into several signal processing topics. We focus on the spectral processing techniques of relevance for the description and transformation of sounds, developing the basic theoretical and practical knowledge with which to analyze, synthesize, transform and describe audio signals in the context of music applications.

      The course is based on open software and content. The demonstrations and programming exercises are done using Python under Ubuntu, and the references and materials for the course come from open online repositories. We are also distributing with open licenses the software and materials developed for the course.

      Recommended Background

      The course assumes some basic background in mathematics and signal processing. Also, since the assignments are done with the programming language Python, some software programming background in any language is most helpful. 

      Suggested Readings

      The main software tools used are in https://github.com/MTG/sms-tools and the sounds to be studied come from https://freesound.org. Most of the external references come from Julius O Smith website, https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos, or from https://www.wikipedia.org.

      Course Format

      Each week is structured around 6 types of activities:

      • Theory: video lectures covering the core signal processing concepts.   
      • Demos: video lectures presenting tools and examples that complement the theory.
      • Programming: video lectures introducing the needed programming skills (using Python) to implement the techniques described in the theory. 
      • Quiz: questionnaire to review the concepts covered. 
      • Assignment: programming exercises to implement and use the methodologies presented. 
      • Advanced topics: videos and written documents that extend the topics covered.

       

      FAQ: 
      • How much programming background is needed for the course?
        All the assignments start from some existing Python code that the student will have to understand and modify. Some programming experience is necessary.

      • Do I need to buy a textbook for the course?
        No, it is self-contained.
      • What resources will I need for this class?
        All the materials and tools for the class are available online under open licences.

      • What is the coolest thing I'll learn if I take this class?
        You will play around with sounds a lot, analysing them, transforming them, and making interesting new sounds.

      • Will I earn a Statement of Accomplishment for completing this course?
        Yes, you will receive a Statement of Accomplishment if you successfully complete the course.

      Instructors

      Xavier Serra; Universitat Pompeu, Fabra of Barcelona

      Julius O Smith; Stanford University


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      Date: 
      Wednesday, April 2, 2014
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      Course topic: 

       
       
      With the power to cross borders and languages, music serves as a compelling tool for unlocking creative potential. 
       
      Creativity: Music to My Ears is a six-week course designed to explore several factors that stimulatecreativity in individuals, teams, and organizations. In each session we will focus on a different variable related to creativity, such as reframing problems, connecting and combining ideas, and challenging assumptions. All of the projects in this experiential course will deal with some aspect of music, including listening, creating, and sharing. No musical talent is required – just an interest in exploring the role that music plays in our lives. 
       
      To deepen your understanding of music, throughout the course we will include video clips from experts in the music industry, including world-renowned Warner Music recording artists, Stanford music scholars, and industry executives who work to bring new and innovative musical expression to a global audience.
       
      The course includes weekly projects that will each take approximately 5 hours to complete. EachWednesday a new challenge will be presented, and the results are due the following Tuesday. The first two weeks there are individual challenges, followed by a two week team project, and a final individual assignment. 
       
      For the two-week, team project, you can select your own team members, we can put you on a team, or you can work by yourself. All assignments will be submitted on the course website and viewed by fellow class participants, allowing you to see a breadth of solutions for each challenge and get feedback on your work. There will also be a course Twitter feed and Facebook page, and several Google Hangouts that will enable active discussions on specific topics. 
       
      As Plato is quoted as saying, "Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and life to everything."

       

       

      Creativity: Music to My Ears

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