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Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.


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Date: 
Monday, April 24, 2017
Course topic: 

About This Course

This course provides a set of resources designed to support educational leaders in driving educational change for English Learners. These resources guide educational leaders through a process of examining existing systemic thinking and structures around the education of English Learners, using organized tools to look more deeply at practices for ELs, and developing or refining a plan to propel systemic change and shift practices. The overall goal is for participating educators to better understand ELs in their context, including their schooling experiences, needs, and successes, and use what they learn to design and implement higher quality educational experiences that build disciplinary knowledge and skills.

Educators in the course will have access to videos, readings, and activities that help them to understand the EL context in their setting, create guiding frameworks such as a vision statement and language development framework, and craft a plan to improve teaching and learning for ELs.

Where appropriate, the course will address state-specific frameworks related to ELs, such as the New York State Blueprint for ELL Success, or the California EL Roadmap, and how participants can use guidance from these frameworks to shape their efforts.

Requirements

This course is intended for district, state, or school-site leaders, EL administrators, or teachers of ELs. There are no prerequisites for the course. However, we encourage you to take the course along with a team of other educators from your district or school so that you can collaboratively engage with these resources.

Course Authors

Maria Santos

María Santos is the co-chair and Senior Advisor for Leadership at Understanding Language. She is the former Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Leadership and Equity-in-Action at the Oakland Unified School District. She has also been a Mathematics & Science Supervisor at San Francisco Unified School District, and Executive Director of the Office of English Learners at the New York City Department of Education. Santos was recently named one of EdWeek's Leaders to Learn from in 2014.

Steven Weiss

Steven Weiss is the Project Manager for the Stanford ELL Leadership Network, a collaboration between seven small to medium sized school districts in Northern California focused on developing leadership capacity around English Language Learners. Prior to joining Understanding Language, he worked at the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) program at WestEd, where he was a professional developer and instructional coach for secondary teachers and administrators in urban school districts such as New York City, Austin, San Diego and San Jose. He has also worked as a K-8 school administrator, a bilingual/ESL resource teacher, and a high school Spanish/History/ESL teacher. Steven is bilingual in Spanish. He holds an M.Ed. from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Administration from San Francisco State University, and an M.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College.

Annie Camey Kuo

Annie Camey Kuo is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Understanding Language/Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (UL/SCALE). Prior to joining the team, she worked with pre-service and in-service teachers and international school leaders in supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students at the University of Washington, where she received her Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture. Her dissertation focused on the adolescent English learner experience with problem-based learning across mainstream content areas. Annie also holds an M.A. from New York University in TESOL and Foreign Language Education and a B.A. in Mandarin Chinese and English from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a 1.5- generation immigrant from Taiwan and has taught ESOL at the secondary and college level in Los Angeles and New York. Annie’s research interest is broadly around English learners and currently focuses on the student experience and problem- and project-based learning.

Frequently Asked Questions

What web browser should I use?

The Open edX platform works best with current versions of Chrome or Firefox. We do not recommend using Internet Explorer.

What is the timeline for this course?

This is a self-paced course, meaning that once you enroll and the course opens, you will be able to navigate through the course resources at your own pace.

Will Statements of Accomplishment be issued in the course?

We will not be issuing Statements of Accomplishment in this course. Future versions of this course may offer the opportunity to obtain a Statement of Accomplishment.


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Date: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 to Tuesday, May 16, 2017
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Course topic: 

 The Course

Given their emphasis on complex and sophisticated disciplinary skills and understandings, the Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards and C3 Framework for State Social Studies Standards require ways of assessing that go beyond routine multiple-choice tests. Whether students are learning to select, use, and explain evidence to support a claim or to analyze data to evaluate a hypothesis, tests that require that students only bubble in a scantron are inadequate to measure (or support) students' learning and growth. Performance assessments are more suited to this task. While performance assessments vary along multiple dimensions, including duration and focus, they all demand that students use and apply critical skills and knowledge to demonstrate understanding.

This ten-week course will focus on the wise implementation of performance assessments and the use of student work products to inform task design and subsequent instruction. Course activities include selecting and adapting a performance assessment to be used in a specific course, implementing that task, and evaluating student work to learn more about the task and students' learning. We will use a learning-centered approach where assessments are not only about measuring learning, but are also events for learning.
The main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  • Select and adapt a high-quality performance task that is aligned with (and embedded within) a curricular unit of study;
  • Develop a set of considerations for effective implementation of performance tasks;
  • Begin to use data from performance tasks to tailor and improve instruction and curriculum;
  • Become familiar with freely-available resources that support the wise use of performance assessments in K-12 classrooms;
  • Contribute to building a community of educators focused on using performance-based assessments to identify and develop students' abilities.

More Information

This course is the second in a series and is open to those who participated in the first course and new participants. The first course, Designing for Deeper Learning: How to Develop Performance Tasks, focused on designing performance assessments and participants in that course designed a performance assessment that they can implement and evaluate in this course. For those who did not participate in that course, the initial sessions in this Implementing course will guide you in selecting and adapting a performance task for your local context.

This MOOC is designed for K-12 educators. We also welcome other educators and policymakers. It is recommended that participants currently teach or have access to a classroom where they can implement their chosen assessment. The target month for implementing that assessment is April 2017. However, there will be alternate options for those who are unable to implement during this month.

Participants will work collaboratively with other educators to accomplish learning goals and complete assignments. We encourage and welcome school, district, or region-based teams to participate and combine our online resources with in-person meetings. We call this a hybrid approach and you can find more information about that approach and our MOOCs here.

The Instructors

Daisy Martin

Director of History/Social Studies Learning at UL-SCALE

Daisy Martin's professional work focuses on the teaching and learning of historical thinking and literacy. She has co-created several digital projects that make research-based, high-quality teaching resources freely available, and has worked with teachers nationwide on designing and using curricula and performance-based assessments. Daisy is a co-founder of the Stanford History Education Group and co-led teachinghistory.org. Her current projects include researching challenges and successes faced by educators in implementing coherent performance assessment systems and working with history teachers in multiple states to design, implement, and learn from curriculum-embedded performance assessments. A former history and civics teacher, Daisy holds a doctorate from Stanford University and a BA in history/philosophy from the University of Michigan.

Ruth Chung Wei

Director of Assessment Research and Development at UL-SCALE

Ruth Chung Wei is currently Director of Assessment Research and Development at Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE), where she leads the design and research on performance-based assessments used in K-12 schools and in teacher education programs. Her current research is focused on the potential of performance assessments to serve as measures of student learning and growth, and the effectiveness of tools and protocols for improving the quality of teacher-designed performance assessments. A former secondary school teacher in the New York City public schools, Ruth Chung Wei completed her doctorate in education at Stanford University.

Designing for Deeper Learning

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Date: 
Monday, June 12, 2017
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OVERVIEW

Starts online June 12, 2017

At Stanford July 25-28, 2017

How is big data transforming our world and changing business, government, and civil society? Discover, through an interdisciplinary lens, how big data is creating new knowledge and value, as well as new privacy and security challenges. Start learning online and then come to Stanford for a three-day, immersive experience. On campus, you’ll interact with Stanford and Silicon Valley experts, explore a range of applications, and collaborate on case studies. (Application and fee apply.)

EXPLORE

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

FEATURED EXPERTS INCLUDE

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinski, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Margaret Levi,, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

COURSE SCHEDULE

Applications open: NOW

Start online: June 12, 2017

Come to Stanford: July 25-28, 2017

Online content closes: September 4, 2017

TUITION

$4950 (covers online materials; on-campus program)

15% non-profit/government/Stanford alumni discount

10% early registration discount (deadline: May 15, 2017)

PLEASE CONTACT

worldview@stanford.edu

APPLY

https://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x24954618751

ABOUT WORLDVIEW STANFORD

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford, which creates interdisciplinary media and learning experiences to engage and inform the public.

Big Data

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Date: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 to Tuesday, May 30, 2017
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Course topic: 

Course Description:

Formative assessment is an instructional practice to gauge where your students are in their learning by gathering evidence of their learning, assessing the evidence, and planning the next steps in instruction. The Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Mathematics, the Next Generation Science Standards, and new English Language Proficiency Standards all include a focus on argumentation, requiring that students construct claims supported by evidence and/or reasoning. In this course, we will explore how formative assessment practices can be targeted in improve student argumentation skills, an essential, cross-disciplinary practice.

Participants in this course will use a range of practical tools for gathering and analyzing language samples that show how students currently construct claims supported by evidence and/or reasoning, as well as identifying next steps in students' development. These tools support formative assessment and instructional planning. Focal topics include: articulating claims; linking evidence and/or reasoning to claims; and evaluating evidence and/or reasoning. We will also explore similarities and differences in argumentation across content areas and grade levels. This course will enable teachers to collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships that result in an online community focused on improving students' abilities to engage in argumentation across content areas. This course is offered jointly by Stanford University and Oregon State University.

Course Objectives:

The main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  1. Recognize and engage in the essential components of formative assessment
  2. Develop a practical understanding of argumentation
  3. Use the entire formative assessment process to focus on language to help ELLs develop argumentation skills
  4. Use Argumentation Analysis Tool to analyze student arguments, focusing on structure and language us
  5. Learn and implement teaching strategies for building students' capacities for argumentation
  6. Collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships

Course Organization:

This MOOC is organized around four sessions. The content for each session will become available on a particular date.

  • Session 1: Introduction to the formative assessment process and how to focus on language while practicing formative assessment
  • Session 2: Argumentation, its role in the new standards and associated language demands
  • Session 3: Using the formative assessment process to interpret students' argumentation skills
  • Session 4: Implementing and adjusting instructional strategies to improve student argumentation

For each of these sessions, course participants will be asked to complete a series of tasks such as watching videos, reading articles or book chapters, and completing individual and team assignments. For the sequencing of the course to be effective, the tasks for Session 1 must be completed before Session 2 begins, and so on. Yet unlike a traditional classroom, there is no specific time or day that participants must log on or "attend" class; participants are free to complete the session tasks at their own pace as long as they finish them in the allotted time.

    More Information

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. How much does the course cost?

    The course is offered free of charge.

    2. Are any materials or textbooks needed for this course?

    You will be asked to complete readings as part of the course, but all required readings will be available for free via the course website. Several of the optional readings will also be free to participants and available online. To access additional optional readings online, participants may need to pay a small fee for copyright royalties to authors and publishers. Details about how to access these optional readings will be available via the course website.

    3. How do I show my school that I completed this course?

    Every participant who completes the course requirements will receive a free statement of accomplishment signed by the instructors. As to whether this free statement of accomplishment may be used for professional development units in your specific context, you would need to check with your employer. Specific requirements for receiving a statement of accomplishment will be available when the course begins.

    4. Do I have to be a teacher to take this course? Who else might be participating in this course?

    You do not have to be a teacher to take this course. The course may also be valuable to ELL coaches, teacher educators, and site and district administrators, among others. In order to fully participate in the course, however, you do need to have access to a classroom in which you can obtain student language samples and implement lessons (or collaborate with classroom teachers to obtain student language samples and implement lessons). This is because several of the course assignments require submitting language samples - either samples of student writing or brief transcriptions of students' oral language - and reflecting on lessons.

    5. Are there any tests or assignments?

    The course will be organized into four sessions. Within each session, you will have one assignment to complete. In general, the course follows a cycle of inquiry approach in which you gather data about student language (specifically, samples of language students used when constructing a claim supported by evidence) implement a lesson based on your insights about student language, reflect on that lesson, and repeat the cycle again. In addition, you will provide feedback to your peers about their work.

    6. If I complete the entire course, how long should I plan on spending in the course and on coursework each week?

    We anticipate that the course will take approximately 30 hours of time to complete. The course will be organized into four sessions, each spanning approximately three weeks. We anticipate that each session will take approximately 7-8 hours to complete, spread out over the approximately three week time span.

    7. Is the course self-paced? Can I work ahead?

    Some aspects of the course, such as readings and lecture videos, you can complete at your own pace. Within each of the four coursesessions you can largely work at your own pace, but you cannot work ahead on future sessions. Because several assignments center around providing feedback to peers and collaboratively creating a lesson plan with your team, you will need to coordinate some aspects of your work with your teammates.

     The Instructors

    Sara Rutherford-Quach's picture

    Sara Rutherford-Quach

    Lecturer in the Stanford Graduate School of Education

    Sara Rutherford-Quach is the Director of Academic Programs & Research for Understanding Language and a Lecturer in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. A former bilingual elementary teacher, Sara has more than 13 years of experience working with linguistically diverse students and their teachers and has conducted extensive research on instructional practices for English learners. Sara was previously awarded a National Academy of Education Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for her work on the role of silence and speech in an elementary classroom serving language-minority students. Her areas of interest include classroom discourse and interaction analysis; language, culture, and instruction in multilingual and multicultural educational environments; institutional, policy and curricular change; and educational equity.

    Karen Thompson's picture

    Karen Thompson

    Assistant Professor, College of Education, Oregon State University

    Dr. Karen Thompson is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics from Stanford University and an M.A. in Education from the University of California, Berkeley, where she also earned an elementary bilingual teaching credential. Prior to entering academia, Dr. Thompson spent more than a decade working with English language learners in California public schools as a bilingual teacher, after-school program coordinator, and school reform consultant. Her research focuses on how policy, curriculum, and instruction interact to shape the experiences of English language learners in U.S. schools.

    Steven Weiss's picture

    Steven Weiss

    Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, Stanford ELL Leadership Network

    Steven Weiss is a Senior Research Associate at Understanding Language/Scale and the Project Manager for the Stanford ELL Leadership Network, a collaboration between seven small to medium sized school districts in Northern California focused on developing leadership capacity around English Language Learners. Prior to joining Understanding Language, he worked at the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) program at WestEd, where he was a professional developer and instructional coach for secondary teachers and administrators in urban school districts such as New York City, Austin, San Diego and San Jose. He has also worked as a K-8 school administrator, a bilingual/ESL resource teacher, and a high school Spanish/History/ESL teacher. Steven is bilingual in Spanish. He holds an M.Ed. from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Administration from San Francisco State University, and an M.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College.

    Stanford University Graduate School of Education and Oregon State University

    Learning as Evidence

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    Date: 
    Tuesday, October 4, 2016
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    Course topic: 

    The Course

    The Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards emphasize improving the quality of student-to-student discourse as a major feature of instruction. The new standards specifically describe the importance of students understanding the reasoning of others and engaging in meaningful conversations using evidence for claims. Yet this type of student-to-student interaction tends to be rare in classrooms. Common classroom teaching activities such as whole class discussions, jigsaws, and think-pair-shares can have the appearance of constructive interactions, but they often do not provide adequate opportunities for all students to engage in back-and-forth dialog. This course looks closely at student-to-student conversations and addresses ways to improve students' abilities to engage in the types of interactions described in the new standards. We will also examine the use of formative assessment as an instructional practice to gauge where your students are in their learning by gathering evidence of their learning, assessing the evidence, and planning the next steps in instruction.

    This course consists of four main sessions with three weeks between each session in order to provide extra time for application and reflection. The learning in this course relies heavily on participant contributions and comments, especially in the team collaboration setting. Participants will be expected to complete both team and individual assignments for all sessions. The sessions and assignments are designed for participants who teach or have access to classrooms in which they can gather samples of students' conversation during lessons.

    Please note that this is a slightly modified version of previous courses offered since the Fall of 2013. This course is targeted towards both elementary and secondary school teachers.

    We hope you will join us on this exciting journey.

    More Information

    Prerequisites

    In order to participate in the course, you will need to have access to a classroom in which you or the teacher you are observing are able to collect short samples of paired student talk on two different occasions.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

    Participants who complete the course requirements will receive a FREE Statement of Accomplishment issued through NovoEd. Please check with your employer as to whether this statement of accomplishment may be used for professional development credit. There is no fee for this course and to receive a statement of accomplishment.

    2. How much of a time commitment will this course require?

    The course has 4 main sessions, each three weeks apart. Studying course materials (lecture videos and readings) takes about two hours per session, while assignments will take around eight hours per session.

    3. Any additional textbooks or software required?

    No.

    Syllabus

    Orientation: Introduction to Course and Teams

    Session 1: Constructive Conversations I

    In this session we dive into what high-quality talk between students can sound like in lessons that effectively teach the new standards. Specifically, we focus on the features of “constructive interactions," during which students create, clarify, support, and negotiate ideas as they talk about concepts and build understandings in a discipline. We also introduce the formative assessment process.

    Session 2: Teaching the Constructive Conversation Skills

    This session focuses on instruction to support the types of rich interaction introduced in Session 1. We analyze video clips that show teaching that fosters interaction skills described in the new standards. We look at activities that help students build interactions skills for staying focused on objectives, building and negotiating ideas, and clarifying ideas.

    Session 3: Constructive Conversations II

    In this session, we will look more in depth at how to foster student interactions that build the learning of lesson objectives, challenge thinking, and push students to use more complex language of the Common Core standards. We also explore how to use the formative assessment process to interpret students' conversation skills.

    Session 4: Collaboration, Communication, and Community

    This will be a summative session, in which we will pull together everything we've covered in the course to create a product that communicates to other teachers the value of having a discourse focus for implementing the new standards. You will also consider next steps for applying and collaborating in this work during the year.


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    Course topic: 

    The Course

    Given their emphasis on complex and sophisticated disciplinary skills and understandings, the Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards and the C3 Framework for State Social Studies Standards require ways of assessing that go beyond routine multiple-choice tests. Whether students are learning to select, use, and explain evidence to support a claim or to analyze data to evaluate a hypothesis, tests that require that students only bubble in a scantron are inadequate to measure (or support) students' learning and growth. Performance assessments are more suited to this task. While performance assessments vary along multiple dimensions, including duration and focus, they all demand that students use and apply critical skills and knowledge to demonstrate understanding.

    This seven session course will focus on building educators' capacity to use and develop curriculum-embedded performance assessments that fit local contexts. Course activities include reviewing sample performance tasks and developing a performance task that is aligned with a specific curricular unit and performance outcomes. We will use a learning-centered approach where assessments are not only about measuring learning, but are also events forlearning.

    This MOOC is designed for grade 6-12 teachers working in the core disciplines of mathematics, language arts, history/social studies, and science. We also welcome other educators and policymakers. Participants will work collaboratively with other educators in their discipline to accomplish course learning goals and assignments.

    The three main objectives of this course are for participants to:

    • Understand and identify features of high quality performance assessments;
    • Develop a grade-level, course-specific, practical, performance task that is aligned with (and embedded within) a curricular unit of study;
    • Contribute to building a community of educators focused on using performance-based assessments to identify and develop students' abilities.

    More Information

    This seven-session course will include video presentations, required readings, homework activities, and peer review. For each of the first five sessions, students can expect to spend a total of 2-4 hours watching videos, reading, completing assignments, and collaborating with peers. In the sixth and seventh session, students will do peer reviews of their colleagues' work and turn in their final assignments.

    We encourage educators to work in groups or teams in the course. Students can join the class with existing partners, or create and join teams once the class has started.

    Upon successful completion of the required assignments, students will earn a "Statement of Accomplishment" from NovoEd.

    A brief outline of course sessions is as follows:

    Session 1. What are performance assessments and why should I use them? What are the key principles of performance assessment?

    Session 2. What is the range of performance assessments? How do I start designing a performance assessment?

    Session 3. What makes a high quality performance assessment?

    Session 4. How will I assess students' work?

    Session 5. How do I tailor and adapt a worthwhile performance task for my diverse students? What does the design process look like in action?

    Session 6. What makes a high quality performance assessment?

    Session 7. Submit final product: Performance Assessment Portfolio. 

    THE INSTRUCTORS

    DAISY MARTIN

    Director of History/Social Studies Learning at SCALE

    Daisy Martin's professional work focuses on the teaching and learning of historical thinking and literacy. She has co-created several digital projects that make research-based, high quality teaching resources freely available, and has worked with teachers nationwide on designing and using curricula and performance-based assessments. Daisy is a co-founder of the Stanford History Education Group and co-led teachinghistory.org. Her current projects include researching challenges and successes faced by educators in implementing coherent performance assessment systems, and working with history teachers in multiple states to design, implement, and learn from curriculum embedded performance assessments. A former history and civics teacher, Daisy holds a doctorate from Stanford University and a BA in history/philosophy from the University of Michigan.

    SCALE CONTENT TEAM

    The SCALE Content Team for this course share extensive experience with all aspects of developing, implementing, and using performance assessments to promote deeper learning. Susan Schultz, Nicole Renner, Jack Dieckmann, and Kari Kokka will provide instruction on their respective areas of expertise: Science, English/Language Arts, and Mathematics.

    RUTH CHUNG WEI

    Director of Assessment Research and Development at SCALE

    Ruth Chung Wei is currently Director of Assessment Research and Development at Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE), where she leads the design and research on performance-based assessments used in K-12 schools and in teacher education programs. Her current research is focused on the potential of performance assessments to serve as measures of student learning and growth, and the effectiveness of tools and protocols for improving the quality of teacher-designed performance assessments. A former secondary school teacher in the New York City public schools, Ruth Chung Wei completed her doctorate in education at Stanford University.

    Designing for Deeper Learning

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    Date: 
    Tuesday, August 9, 2016
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    Course topic: 

    ABOUT THIS COURSE

    The Technology for Accountability Lab is a free, action-oriented course on using digital tools to promote transparency and accountability in politics, government and public affairs. The course is intended for (1) civic activists who have an interest in using technology in their work and (2) technologists who are interested in using their skills to build a more democratic and less corrupt world. Course content will be available in both English and Arabic, with a joint discussion board across the two languages.

    The course includes 7 weeks of video lectures by experts from Stanford, the National Democratic Institute and other leaders in the field. Topics include:

    • Why Transparency is Important
    • Human-Centered Design
    • Monitoring Corruption at the Grassroots
    • Monitoring Parliaments
    • Monitoring Elections and Political Funding
    • Getting Citizens Involved
    • Monitoring the Private Sector
    • Telling Stories with Data

    Click here for a complete course syllabus. Participants will also have the option to collaborate on projects to design or implement real-world democracy tools, including advocacy materials, during the course.

    The course is offered by the Program on Liberation Technology at Stanford University in collaboration with the National Democratic Institute.

    PREREQUISITES

    Participants need not have a background in software development or civic engagement to take this course. There are no prerequisites.

    COURSE LEADERS

    The course was created by experts at the Program on Liberation Technology, Stanford University and the National Democratic Institute. 

    Vivek Srinivasan, Program on Liberation Technology, Stanford University

    Vivek has campaigned for various socio-economic rights in India, including the right to food, education and the right to information. His experience with these campaigns convinced him of the productive role that technology could play in popular movements, which led him to his current position. At Stanford, he leads the Combating Corruption with Mobile Phones Project which seeks to improve accountability by making the government transparent to the rural poor. He is also setting up a project to empower elected women Panchayat presidents in India through mobile phones.

    Scott Hubli, National Democratic Institute

    Scott is the Director of Governance Programs at the National Democratic Institute, supporting the Institute's programs on legislative development, open government, and local governance worldwide. With the Congress of Chile, he represents NDI as co-chair of the OGP Legislative Openness Working Group. Along with NDI's partners, Scott led the development of OpeningParliament.org and the drafting of the Declaration on Parliamentary Openness, a set of principles on parliamentary transparency and citizen participation.

    Sarah Welsh, National Democratic Institute

    Sarah is a Program Officer for the Governance team at the National Democratic Institute, where she supports global programs dealing with civic innovation, distance engagement and urban governance. Before joining NDI, she worked as an open-government advocate, journalist and Peace Corps volunteer.

    PRESENTERS

    TFALab is organized as a seminar series, with short presentations by the scholars and expert practitioners below. 

    Tanja Aitamurto, Brown Media Institute

    Tanja Aitamurto, Ph.D. is the Deputy Director and a postdoctoral Brown Fellow at the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at the School of Engineering at Stanford. She examines how collective intelligence, whether gathered by crowdsourcing, crowdfunding or co-creation, impacts journalism, governance and product design - particularly media innovations. Tanja is the author of Crowdsourcing for Democracy: New Era in Policy-Making. She has led the design and implementation of the Finnish Experiment, a pioneering case in crowdsourcing policymaking. She advises and studies open-government projects in several countries, including topics such as participatory budgeting and crowdsourced legislation. She has attended meetings and given talks about her research at the White House, the Wikimedia Foundation, OECD, the Council of Europe and in several parliaments and governments, including those of Canada, Austria and Finland.

    Greg Brown, National Democratic Institute

    Greg Brown supports the National Democratic Institute's work on legislative strengthening, good governance, and parliamentary openness, including theOpeningParliament.org project and the Open Government Partnership's Legislative Openness Working Group. Prior to joining NDI, Greg was an International Policy Fellow at the Sunlight Foundation.

    Larry Diamond, Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, Stanford University

    Larry Diamond is Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and founding co-editor of the Journal of Democracy. At Stanford University, he is professor by courtesy of political science and sociology, and he coordinates the democracy program of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL), within the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI).

    Ons Ben Abdelkarim, Al Bawsala

    Ons, 27 years old, graduated from the French Engineering School Télécom Sud Paris (formerly Télécom INT) in 2012. She worked as a consultant for a security and risk management consulting firm, providing her the opportunity to work for prominent French and international companies, before returning to Tunisia in 2013. In Tunisia, she joined Al Bawsala, a Tunisian leading NGO working on accountability and good governance, where she served as secretary general during two years (2013-2015), the as president since 2015.

    Asim Fayaz, University of California, Berkeley

    Asim recently finished his Masters in Development Practice from UC Berkeley and is now a Data Scientist at Premise Data, a tech startup based in SF. In the past, he co-founded theTechnology for People Initiative, a Google and UKAid-funded technology and design startup, and worked for the World Bank in Pakistan on tech-enabled governance reform, which included the USD 50M Punjab Public Management Reform Program. He is an Acumen Fellow and won the TED Prize for City 2.0. He also holds a BS in Computer Science from Lahore University of Management Sciences.

    Cristiano Ferri Soares de Faria, Chamber of Deputies, Brazil

    Cristiano is a senior official of the Brazilian House of Representatives and has been working in lawmaking, opening parliament, digital democracy, parliamentary informatics, transparency, innovation and quality of law (legistic) for 23 years. He coordinated the e-Democracia Program, which Members of Congress can use to engage citizens in lawmaking. He also led the two legislative hackathons that the House hosted in 2013 and 2014, and is the founder and director of Hackerlab, the first permanent hacker space to be established in a national parliament.

    Lindsay Ferris, formerly Sunlight Foundation

    Until March 2016, Lindsay Ferris was the lead on Sunlight Foundation's efforts to confront money's influence on political power structures internationally. After working within the world of electoral politics in the U.S., she became a global advocate for using technology and open data to reduce corruption and increase access to information on political finance and lobbying activities. Lindsay holds a Bachelor's degree in Russian Language and Philosophy from the University of Virginia. She is now pursuing graduate studies.

    Hind Kabaj, SimSim-Participation Citoyenne

    Hind Kabaj is the president and cofounder of SimSim-Participation Citoyenne. A lawyer by training, Hind's professional experience has focused on the field of international development, including the areas of governance, citizen participation and gender equality. Prior to SimSim, Hind consulted for organizations such as the World Bank, the American Bar Association and Tetra Tech International Development. She also served as Middle East and North Africa Specialist for Tetra Tech International Development’s Democracy and Governance practice. Hind holds an LL.M. in International Legal Studies from Georgetown University in Washington, DC and a Master's in Business Law from Mohammed V University (Faculty of Law, Rabat-Agdal). She speaks Arabic, French, English and Spanish.

    Manel Lahrabi, Mourakiboun

    Manel Lahrabi is the Monitoring and Evaluation Manager for Mourakiboun, and has been a core member of the organization's team since 2011.

    Finnur Magnusson, Meniga

    Finnur Magnusson likes to make things. Since he made his first website, he has been fascinated with the potential of online communities. He got the opportunity to use these skills when he spearheaded the prototype for a new way of creating constitutions with direct input from the public, in Iceland. He is currently a product manager at Meniga. He also likes to make beer and bacon and likes to ride his bicycle.

    Michael McNulty, National Democratic Institute

    Michael McNulty is a Senior Program Manager for the Elections Team of the National Democratic Institute. He has more than 15 years of experience managing and providing technical assistance on election-related and civil society programs in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. He has worked on a wide range of issues including election observation, organizational development, civic advocacy, election reform, electronic technologies in elections, and open election data. He earned his Master's degree from the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University and his Bachelor's degree from Ohio State University. He currently focuses on election law reform, monitoring and mitigating electoral violence, open election data and electronic technologies in elections.

    Maggie Murphy, Transparency International

    Maggie joined Transparency International in February 2013 and serves as Senior Global Advocacy Manager, with particular focus on the G20 and financial transparency issues. Prior to joining TI, she was the Geneva Representative for Minority Rights Group International, leading their human rights advocacy work with governments and within the UN human rights mechanisms. She holds a BA from Oxford University and a MSc from the London School of Economics.

    Miroslav Palansky, Institute of Economic Studies, Charles University in Prague

    Miroslav Palansky is a postgraduate student at the Institute of Economic Studies at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, focusing on public policy and development economics, and a researcher at EconLab, where he is part of its project on political financing. His current work includes policy-related projects for the Ministry of Finance of Georgia, the European Commission and UNU-WIDER.

    Alasdair Roberts, Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri

    Alasdair Roberts is the co-editor of the journal Governance, a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and a public member of the Administrative Conference of the United States. He received his law degree from the University of Toronto and his PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University.

    Whitney Smithers, City of Calgary

    Whitney Smithers is a leader at the City of Calgary, promoting transformation in service delivery and customer interaction, including rethinking land-use planning systems. While working in finance, she delivered an award-winning multi-year business plan and budget. She has worked in government, private and not-for-profit sectors. She has an undergraduate degree in geography from University of Western Ontario and a Masters in Environmental Design from the University of Calgary, as well as a Masters certificate in Municipal Leadership from York.

    Vitezslav Titl, EconLab, z.v. Prague, University of Siegen, KU Leuven

    Vitezslav Titl is a researcher at Vrije Universiteit Brussel and EconLab in Prague, where he is also developing a website about the funding of Czech political parties (PolitickeFinance.cz.). His research mainly focuses on financing of political parties and the influence of political connections on the allocation of public funds and on the efficiency of public good provision. Currently, he is pursuing his PhD in political economics jointly at the University of Siegen and at KU Leuven.

    Timothy Vollmer, Creative Commons

    Timothy Vollmer is the Policy Manager for Creative Commons. He helps coordinate CC's public policy positions in collaboration with staff, an international affiliate network, and broad community of copyright experts. He educates policymakers at all levels and across various disciplines such as education, data, science, culture, and government about copyright licensing, the public domain, and the adoption of open policies.

    Dave Whiteland, mySociety

    Dave joined mySociety as a developer, but he doesn’t write much code these days — he spends his time helping people around the world use mySociety’s tools and platforms. As part of mySociety's busy international team, he has assisted local groups in many countries with their civic projects. He is often the bridge between non-technical and technical people on the ground, and mySociety’s in-house developers and designers.

    Derek Willis, ProPublica

    Derek Willis is a news applications developer at ProPublica, focusing on politics and elections. He previously worked as a developer and reporter at The New York Times, a database editor at The Washington Post, and at the Center for Public Integrity and Congressional Quarterly. He began his journalism career at The Palm Beach Post. He is a co-founder of OpenElections, a project to collect and publish election results from all 50 states. He lives outside Washington, D.C., with his wife and daughter, and lives online at thescoop.org or @derekwillis.

    Terry Winograd, Stanford

    Terry Winograd is Professor of Computer Science Emeritus at Stanford. He created and directed the Human-Computer Interaction Group and the teaching and research program in Human-Computer Interaction Design. He was a founding faculty member of thed.school and of the Program on Liberation Technology at Stanford University. He has been a consultant to a number of companies, including Google, which was founded by his students. He is also a founding member of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility.

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    Do I need to buy a textbook?

    No textbook is required for the course.

    Can I earn a statement of accomplishment?

    Yes, you can earn a statement of accomplishment with a "pass" or "distinction". Getting a statement with 'pass' requires you to watch at least 10 of the videos completely. Earning a distinction requires you to participate in a project, in addition to watching the videos.

    Technology for Accountability Lab

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    Date: 
    Monday, July 25, 2016
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    Course topic: 

    Fee Applies.

    Now Open!

    ABOUT THIS COURSE

    New College-and-Career-Readiness standards emphasize the importance of speaking, listening, and conversing not only as a means for learning, but also as a valuable goal of learning. This short summer course is intended to help teachers prepare for teaching students to have in-depth conversations about content area concepts and topics. The first month of school is a vital time for establishing norms, building participation structures, preparing lessons, and fostering a culture of productive and respectful communication. The three sessions in this course will provide you with clear explanations, examples, and rationales for establishing constructive classroom conversations from the get go, when it counts the most.

    Thousands of educators have participated in our professional development courses. A big a-ha! moment for these participants is the introduction to and practice with language tools. In this course we will be working with the Conversation Analysis Tool that has been developed by our team. The Conversation Analysis Tool is aligned with the shift in contemporary English Language Proficiency standards and focuses on language functions (what students do with language as they engage with content and interact with others) rather than language forms (grammar and vocabulary). Teachers can use this tool to examine whether conversational turns are building up previous turns to build up an idea, and more importantly, whether the conversational turns focus on content or skills related to the lesson objectives. This quick and easy tool allows teachers to formatively evaluate teaching and student learning, and to receive and offer feedback on a daily and weekly basis.

    This course will serve as good preparation for our quarter-long Constructive Classroom Conversations course in the fall. Participants will be able to build on and put into practice what they have learned in this short course, and to collect, analyze and act on conversations between their own students.

    Classroom teachers and instructional coaches from grades K to 12 and in all subject areas are welcome and encouraged to take this course together with their colleagues (for example, content teachers with ELD/ESL teachers).

    COURSE CONTENT AT-A-GLANCE

    This course consists of three online sessions, three weeks in a row. Each session includes expert video screencasts, classroom video clips, readings and resources, and assignments that will prompt participants to strengthen the curricular foundations of communication the first month of school.

    • Session 1: Establishing a Classroom Culture of Conversation (August 2 - August 8) - This session provides models and suggested activities for cultivating classrooms that value learning through constructive conversation.
    • Session 2: Creating Effective Conversation Prompts & Tasks (August 9 - August 15) - This session focuses on how to look at a lesson, envision the conversational opportunities, and craft effective prompts for back and forth conversations between students.
    • Session 3: Preparing for Effective & Efficient Formative Assessment of Conversations (August 16 - August 22) - The session prepares participants to (1) set up an assessment plan for assessing and reflecting on observations of paired student conversations, (2) provide immediate feedback to students during their conversations, and (3) reflect on conversation assessment to improve teaching and assessment.

    COURSE INSTRUCTORS

    Kenji Hakuta; Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Kenji Hakuta is active in education policy. He has testified to Congress and courts on language policy, the education of language minority students, affirmative action in higher education, and improvement of quality in educational research. Kenji is an elected Member of the National Academy of Education, a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, recognized for his accomplishments in Linguistics and Language Sciences. He has served on the board of various organizations, including the Educational Testing Service, the Spencer Foundation, and the New Teacher Center.

    Jeff Zwiers; Senior Researcher in the Graduate School of Education

    Jeff has worked for more than fifteen years as a professional developer and instructional mentor in urban school settings, emphasizing the development of literacy, thinking, and academic language for linguistically and culturally diverse students. He has published books and articles on reading, thinking, and academic language. His most recent book is Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings. His current work at the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching focuses on developing teachers’ core practices for teaching academic language, comprehension of complex texts, and oral communication skills across subject areas.

    Sara Rutherford-Quach; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Education

    Sara Rutherford-Quach, a former bilingual elementary teacher, has more than 13 years of experience working with linguistically diverse students and their teachers and has conducted extensive research on instructional practices for English learners. Sara was previously awarded a National Academy of Education Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for her work on the role of silence and speech in an elementary classroom serving language-minority students. Her areas of interest include classroom discourse and interaction analysis; language, culture, and instruction in multilingual and multicultural educational environments; institutional, policy, and curricular change; and educational equity. Sara has been involved with the design and teaching of more than 20 MOOC offerings since 2013 and she also directed the development of many learning modules with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the ELPA 21 Consortium.

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    Is there any prerequisite for the course?

    No.

    Will I get a Record of Completion?

    Students will receive a Record of Completion upon finishing the course requirements. Please note that Stanford University makes no representation that participation in the course, including participation leading to a statement of accomplishment, will be accepted by any school district or other entity as evidence of professional development. Participants are solely responsible for determining whether participation in the course, including obtaining a record of completion, will be accepted by a school district, or any other entity, as evidence of professional development coursework.

    What is the course pace?

    Unlike a traditional classroom, there is no specific time or day that you must log on or “attend” class: you are free to complete the session tasks at your own pace as long as you finish them within the allotted time.

    Any additional textbooks or software required?

    No.

    Effective Conversation

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    Date: 
    Monday, October 24, 2016
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    Starts online October 24, 2016

    At Stanford: December 6-9, 2016

    Accepting Applications:

    February 15, 2016 – October 23, 2016

    Application and Fee Apply.

    This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates interdisciplinary learning experiences for professionals to prepare them for the strategic challenges ahead.

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

    Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

    Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

    FEATURED EXPERTS

    Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

    Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

    Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

    Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

    Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

    Michal Kosinsk, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

    Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

    John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

    • Synthesize expert opinions from researchers and Silicon Valley innovators to understand big data's opportunities and challenges. Balance the tradeoffs between individual privacy and security and social value.
    • Apply strategies for leveraging the potential of big data while managing potential vulnerabilities, both personally and organizationally.
    Big Data

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