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Education
Date: 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017
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The Course

This course supports educational leaders in driving educational change for English Learner (EL) students in California. Participants examine existing systemic thinking and structures that support the education of English Learners, use tools to look more deeply at practices for ELs, and develop (or refine) an EL implemenation plan to propel systemic change and shift practices.

The overall goal is for participating educators to better understand their EL population, their schooling experiences, needs, and successes, and use what they learn to design and implement higher quality educational experiences that build disciplinary knowledge and skills. Participants will hear from both experts in the field as well as from district leaders on how LCAP/LCFF can be used to drive systemic improvements in the education of English learners.

The course organizes a community of practice for educators as they think carefully about how LCAP/LCFF planning and implementation can support systemic improvements for their ELs. To improve the quality of systemic practices, educators need to collaborate with educators across schools and district to design, test and refine their programs, policies and practices. This course engages leadership teams in collaborative inquiry and plan construction.

Through a facilitated planning process, the course asks participants to gather, analyze, and share examples of products drawn from their planning processes. These will include items such as

  • a vision statement for English Learners
  • a language development framework
  • theory of action
  • an EL implementation plan

Course Objectives

The main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  1. Study more carefully ELs' experiences and use a variety of analysis tools to analyze students' experiences, aspirations, needs, and strategies for success.
  2. Develop a practical understanding of academically-engaged classroom discourse.
  3. Learn and practice leadership strategies as a local EL implementation plan is built.
  4. Give and receive feedback from peers and experts as teams develop components of the plan.
  5. Collaborate with other educational leaders and build professional relationships that result in a community focused on quality educational experiences that build ELLs' disciplinary knowledge and skills.

The Instructors

Maria Santos

Maria  Santos's picture

Co-Chair and Senior Advisor, Understanding Language

 

María Santos is the co-chair and Senior Advisor for Leadership at Understanding Language. She is the former Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Leadership and Equity-in-Action at the Oakland Unified School District. She has also been a Mathematics & Science Supervisor at San Francisco Unified School District, and Executive Director of the Office of English Learners at the New York City Department of Education. Santos was recently named one of EdWeek's Leaders to Learn from in 2014.

 

 

Steven Weiss

Steven Weiss's picture

Senior Research Associate, Understanding Language at Stanford University

 

Steven Weiss is a Senior Research Associate at Stanford's Understanding Language initiative. Prior to joining Understanding Language, he worked at the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) program at WestEd, where he was a professional developer and instructional coach for secondary teachers and administrators in urban school districts such as New York City, Austin, San Diego and San Jose. He has also worked as a K-8 school administrator, a bilingual/ESL resource teacher, and a high school Spanish/History/ESL teacher. Steven is bilingual in Spanish. He holds an M.Ed. from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Administration from San Francisco State University, and an M.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College.

 

Annie Kuo

Annie Kuo's picture

Postdoctoral Scholar, Understanding Language at Stanford University

 

Annie Camey Kuo is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Understanding Language at Stanford University. Prior to joining the team, she worked with pre-service and in-service teachers and international school leaders in supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students at the University of Washington, where she received her Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture. Her dissertation focused on the adolescent English learner experience with problem-based learning across mainstream content areas. Annie also holds an M.A. from New York University in TESOL and Foreign Language Education and a B.A. in Mandarin Chinese and English from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a 1.5- generation immigrant from Taiwan and has taught ESOL at the secondary and college level in Los Angeles and New York. Annie's research interest is broadly around English learners and currently focuses on the student experience and problem- and project-based learning.

 

Claude Goldenberg

Claude Goldenberg's picture

Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University

 

Claude Goldenberg is the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. A native of Argentina, his areas of research and professional interest center on promoting academic achievement among language minority children and youth. Prior to his arrival at Stanford, Goldenberg was Professor of Teacher Education, Associate Dean of the College of Education, and Executive Director of the Center for Language Minority Education and Research (CLMER) at California State University, Long Beach.

Goldenberg received his A.B. in history from Princeton University and M.A. and Ph.D. from Graduate School of Education, UCLA. He has taught junior high school in San Antonio, TX, and first grade in a bilingual elementary school in the Los Angeles area.

 


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Date: 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 to Tuesday, January 23, 2018
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

New College- and Career-Ready standards emphasize the importance of speaking, listening, and conversing not only as a means for learning, but also as a valuable goal of learning. Starting October 3, Professor Kenji Hakuta and Drs. Sara Rutherford-Quach and Jeff Zwiers at Stanford Graduate School of Education once again will offer an online professional development course that focuses on student conversations, Constructive Classroom Conversations: Improving Student-to-Student Interactions. The overall purpose of this course is help teachers prepare students, and particularly language learners, to have in-depth conversations about content area concepts and topics.

This course consists of six online sessions, with two or three weeks devoted to each session. Each session includes expert video screencasts, classroom video clips, readings and resources, and assignments that will prompt participants to strengthen the curricular foundations of communication. Participants are free to complete the session tasks at their own pace as long as they finish them within the allotted time. Participants will learn to:

  • listen purposefully in order to assess student-to-student conversations
  • craft effective prompts and create conversational opportunities within a lesson
  • model and build activities for cultivating constructive classroom conversations
  • provide productive feedback to students and make instructional changes to strength conversations

The teaching team has been designing and offering online professional development courses for four years. All three instructors work in Stanford University’s Understanding Language Initiative, which focuses on language, learning, and equity issues across a range of educational settings. Thousands of educators have participated in these professional development courses. Comments such as this are common:

I have already been using the constructive conversation model in my lessons and have plans for many more.  My students […] actually ask when they will get to have a conversation again. They know the difference between just partner share, which is boring to them, and having a conversation. During one conversation, a student actually stated that he felt like an adult the way he was talking about books.  That's when I knew this was really a great tool to improve student speaking, and most of all their thinking. It also allows me access to student thought processes and thus to their knowledge and understanding of what I am teaching.  I made many incorrect assumptions in the past about what students knew; now I can structure a conversation to find out what they really know.

Our experience shows that the most successful MOOC completion rates are achieved when participants collaborate in face-to-face settings between the online sessions, such as in organized professional learning communities or during after-school meetings led by district coaches.

Classroom teachers and instructional coaches from grades K to 12 and in all subject areas are welcome and encouraged to take this course together with their colleagues. We look forward to working with you this fall!

PREREQUISITES

There is no pre-requisites for the course. Classroom teachers and instructional coaches from grades K to 12 and in all subject areas are welcome and encouraged to take this course together with their colleagues.

COURSE INSTRUCTORS

 

Sara Rutherford-Quach

Dr. Sara Rutherford-Quach is the Director of Academic Programs and Research for Understanding Language in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. A former bilingual elementary teacher, Sara has more than 13 years of experience working with linguistically diverse students and their teachers and has conducted extensive research on instructional practices for English learners. Sara was previously awarded a National Academy of Education Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for her work on the role of silence and speech in an elementary classroom serving language-minority students. Her areas of interest include classroom discourse and interaction analysis; language, culture, and instruction in multilingual and multicultural educational environments; institutional, policy and curricular change; and educational equity.

 

Jeff Zwiers

Dr. Jeff Zwiers is the Director of Professional Development at Understanding Language at Stanford Graduate School of Edcuation. He has worked for more than fifteen years as a professional developer and instructional mentor in urban school settings, emphasizing the development of literacy, thinking, and academic language for linguistically and culturally diverse students. He has published books and articles on reading, thinking, and academic language. His most recent book is Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings. His current work focuses on developing teachers’ core practices for teaching academic language, comprehension of complex texts, and oral communication skills across subject areas. He holds a BA in Psychology from Stanford, an MAT in Language and Reading from Stanford, and a PhD in Education from USF.

 

Kenji Hakuta

Prof. Kenji Hakuta is the Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus at Stanford Graduate School of Education. He is an experimental psycholinguist who has worked on research, practice, and policy supporting English Language Learners for over 30 years. He recently served on the Validation Committee for the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What web browser should I use?

To optimize your learning experience, please use the current versions of Chrome and Firefox.

Any additional textbooks or software required?

No.

Will I receive any completion document upon finishing the course?

Participants who complete the course requirement will be eligible to receive a Statement of Accomplishment after the course ends.

How many professional development hours is this course equivalent to?

We estimate that the coursework is equivalent to approximately 40 professional development hours to individuals who complete the course and gain a Statement of Accomplishment.

Can my work in this course be accepted by a school district??

Stanford University makes no representations that participation in the course, including participation leading to a record of completion, will be accepted by any school district or other entity as evidence of professional development. Participants are solely responsible for determining whether participation in the course, including obtaining a record of completion, will be accepted by a school district, or any other entity, as evidence of professional development coursework.


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Date: 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 to Tuesday, March 6, 2018
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Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

New learning standards for math emphasize the importance of developing students’ abilities to reason and articulate reasoning across a variety of topics in math. Starting October 3, Jeff Zwiers, Phil Daro, and Shelbi Cole will offer a free online professional development course, Integrating Language Development and Content Learning in Math: Focus on Reasoning, to help teachers improve their design and development of learning activities that foster mathematical reasoning and its language.

The sessions will zoom in on different language modes and how they can foster students’ abilities to reason and describe their reasoning. Sessions focus on listening, speaking, whole class conversations, small group and pair conversations, reading, and writing. We provide a design tool and plenty of practice using it in order to strengthen the language development potential of a wide range of math teaching activities. The course also includes instructional activities and routines to be used across lessons and units to meet the linguistic and cultural needs of English learners and other students who struggle with the language demands of learning math.

This course consists of seven online sessions, with three weeks or so between each session. Each session includes expert video screencasts, reflection prompts, classroom video clips, readings, resources, and assignments that will prompt participants to use what they learn in their classrooms and reflect on student language use. Participants are free to complete the session tasks at their own pace as long as they finish them within the allotted time. Teachers (K-12) will learn how:

  • Authentic communication in the math classroom accelerates both language and content development
  • To model and strengthen activities for reasoning and its language
  • To integrate and leverage different language modes in one activity
  • To formatively assess language and reasoning to improve instruction

REQUIREMENTS

There is no pre-requisites for the course. Classroom teachers and instructional coaches from grades K to 12 who teach math are welcome and encouraged to take this course together with their colleagues.

COURSE INSTRUCTORS

 

Jeff Zwiers

Dr. Jeff Zwiers is the Director of Professional Development at Understanding Language at Stanford Graduate School of Edcuation. He has worked for more than fifteen years as a professional developer and instructional mentor in urban school settings, emphasizing the development of literacy, thinking, and academic language for linguistically and culturally diverse students. He has published books and articles on reading, thinking, and academic language. His most recent book is Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings. His current work focuses on developing teachers’ core practices for teaching academic language, comprehension of complex texts, and oral communication skills across subject areas. He holds a BA in Psychology from Stanford, an MAT in Language and Reading from Stanford, and a PhD in Education from USF.

 

 

Phil Daro

Dr. Phil Daro is a mathematics educator who most recently co-directed the development of the Common Core State Standards for mathematics. He has also directed large-scale teacher professional development programs for the University of California including the California Mathematics Project and the American Mathematics Project. He is Site Director of the Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) at the San Francisco Unified School District. Steering Committee, Math Work Group (chair), and District Engagement Committee.

 

 

Shelbi Cole

Dr. Shelbi Cole is a Senior Content Specialist on the Mathematics team at Student Achievement Partners. Prior to joining the team, Shelbi was the Director of Mathematics for the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. She was a high school mathematics teacher and has worked on a range of projects in curriculum development, teacher professional learning, and pre-service teacher education. Shelbi holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Mathematics Education and a doctoral degree in Educational Psychology from the University of Connecticut.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What web browser should I use?

To optimize your learning experience, please use the current versions of Chrome and Firefox.

Any additional textbooks or software required?

No.

Will I receive any completion document upon finishing the course?

Participants who complete the course requirement will be eligible to receive a Statement of Accomplishment after the course ends.

How many professional development hours is this course equivalent to?

We estimate that the coursework is equivalent to approximately 40 professional development hours to individuals who complete the course and gain a Statement of Accomplishment.

Can my work in this course be accepted by a school district??

Stanford University makes no representations that participation in the course, including participation leading to a record of completion, will be accepted by any school district or other entity as evidence of professional development. Participants are solely responsible for determining whether participation in the course, including obtaining a record of completion, will be accepted by a school district, or any other entity, as evidence of professional development coursework.


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Date: 
Sunday, September 10, 2017
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Overview

Blended and Online Learning Design is a guide to creating digital learning content at Stanford. It walks you through the design process from beginning to end and currently consists of the following modules:

Introduction: How do I navigate these modules? What resources does Stanford provide for me?
Planning Your Course: How do I get started with creating my course? What platforms are available? What tools can I use?
Designing Blended Courses: How do I design an effective course with both online and face-to-face components?
Designing for All Learners: How do I design inclusive and accessible course content?
Presenting Content Online: How can I most effectively use videos, slides, HTML, and other media to present course content?
Creating Assessments: What types of assessments are available and how can I use them most effectively?
Fostering Social Presence & Motivation Online: How do I build genuine community to keep students motivated?
We are in the process of developing additional content, which will be released incrementally.

Self-Paced Resources

The modules in Blended and Online Learning Design are self-paced, meaning they have no deadlines, and the materials will be available indefinitely for you to work through on your own schedule. The modules can be completed in any order and should serve as a resource for you during the creation of your online content.

Prerequisites

These resources are designed for Stanford faculty and staff members who are involved with creating online instructional content. We will assume that you have experience teaching on campus, but not online.

These resources were developed by the Stanford Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are there recommendations on specific platforms and tools that I can use in my course production?
Although we recognize the value of providing such information, the ever-changing landscape of educational technologies makes it a significant challenge to keep information current. Therefore, we provide general information, but for details, we recommend that you request a consultation with one of our instructional designers.

Can I obtain a Statement of Accomplishment?

No. The modules are designed to allow participants the flexibility to skip through and view whatever content is relevant to their own needs.

Are there required assignments?

No. However, each module contains optional activities and exercises.

How many hours should I expect to spend on each module?

It varies because some of the modules have much more content than others. Also, you may elect to skip parts of modules that are not relevant to you. On average, each module should take from 1 to 3 hours to complete in its entirety.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

No textbook is required. A resource that might be helpful is How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching by Susan A. Ambrose, Michael W. Bridges, Michele DiPietro, Marsha C. Lovett, and Marie K. Norman (Jossey-Bass, 2010).

Is this resource open to non-Stanford participants?

Yes. However, the content is written with a Stanford audience in mind. Please check with your own institution for information about its specific resources and policies.

 


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Date: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course introduces the strategic framework that underlies any social program--whether concerned with health, education, drug abuse, or the environment-- offered by a nonprofit organization or government agency.

The course will take you through the essentials of nonprofit and philanthropy strategy. You will apply the basic elements of strategic planning―from defining the problem through designing a theory of change to evaluating outcomes―to real-world problems. With this foundation, you will be able to develop strategies that will inform your work as a nonprofit leader, philanthropist, or policy maker, and help ensure that you achieve demonstrable long-term impact, rather than the illusion of results.

FACULTY

Paul Brest

Paul Brest is former dean and professor emeritus (active) at Stanford Law School, and is one of the three faculty directors of the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. From 2000 until 2012, he was president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation—one of the largest grantmaking foundations in the world.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How much time will it take to complete this course?

Each module should take about 5 hours to complete.

Does this course offer a Statement of Accomplishment?

No.


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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Course Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.


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Date: 
Monday, April 24, 2017
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Course topic: 

About This Course

This course provides a set of resources designed to support educational leaders in driving educational change for English Learners. These resources guide educational leaders through a process of examining existing systemic thinking and structures around the education of English Learners, using organized tools to look more deeply at practices for ELs, and developing or refining a plan to propel systemic change and shift practices. The overall goal is for participating educators to better understand ELs in their context, including their schooling experiences, needs, and successes, and use what they learn to design and implement higher quality educational experiences that build disciplinary knowledge and skills.

Educators in the course will have access to videos, readings, and activities that help them to understand the EL context in their setting, create guiding frameworks such as a vision statement and language development framework, and craft a plan to improve teaching and learning for ELs.

Where appropriate, the course will address state-specific frameworks related to ELs, such as the New York State Blueprint for ELL Success, or the California EL Roadmap, and how participants can use guidance from these frameworks to shape their efforts.

Price: Free

Requirements

This course is intended for district, state, or school-site leaders, EL administrators, or teachers of ELs. There are no prerequisites for the course. However, we encourage you to take the course along with a team of other educators from your district or school so that you can collaboratively engage with these resources.

Course Authors

Maria Santos

María Santos is the co-chair and Senior Advisor for Leadership at Understanding Language. She is the former Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Leadership and Equity-in-Action at the Oakland Unified School District. She has also been a Mathematics & Science Supervisor at San Francisco Unified School District, and Executive Director of the Office of English Learners at the New York City Department of Education. Santos was recently named one of EdWeek's Leaders to Learn from in 2014.

 

Steven Weiss

Steven Weiss is the Project Manager for the Stanford ELL Leadership Network, a collaboration between seven small to medium sized school districts in Northern California focused on developing leadership capacity around English Language Learners. Prior to joining Understanding Language, he worked at the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) program at WestEd, where he was a professional developer and instructional coach for secondary teachers and administrators in urban school districts such as New York City, Austin, San Diego and San Jose. He has also worked as a K-8 school administrator, a bilingual/ESL resource teacher, and a high school Spanish/History/ESL teacher. Steven is bilingual in Spanish. He holds an M.Ed. from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Administration from San Francisco State University, and an M.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College.

 

Annie Camey Kuo

Annie Camey Kuo is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Understanding Language/Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (UL/SCALE). Prior to joining the team, she worked with pre-service and in-service teachers and international school leaders in supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students at the University of Washington, where she received her Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture. Her dissertation focused on the adolescent English learner experience with problem-based learning across mainstream content areas. Annie also holds an M.A. from New York University in TESOL and Foreign Language Education and a B.A. in Mandarin Chinese and English from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a 1.5- generation immigrant from Taiwan and has taught ESOL at the secondary and college level in Los Angeles and New York. Annie’s research interest is broadly around English learners and currently focuses on the student experience and problem- and project-based learning.

Frequently Asked Questions

What web browser should I use?

The Open edX platform works best with current versions of Chrome or Firefox. We do not recommend using Internet Explorer.

What is the timeline for this course?

This is a self-paced course, meaning that once you enroll and the course opens, you will be able to navigate through the course resources at your own pace.

Will Statements of Accomplishment be issued in the course?

We will not be issuing Statements of Accomplishment in this course. Future versions of this course may offer the opportunity to obtain a Statement of Accomplishment.

 


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Date: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 to Tuesday, May 16, 2017
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Course topic: 

The Course

Given their emphasis on complex and sophisticated disciplinary skills and understandings, the Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards and C3 Framework for State Social Studies Standards require ways of assessing that go beyond routine multiple-choice tests. Whether students are learning to select, use, and explain evidence to support a claim or to analyze data to evaluate a hypothesis, tests that require that students only bubble in a scantron are inadequate to measure (or support) students' learning and growth. Performance assessments are more suited to this task. While performance assessments vary along multiple dimensions, including duration and focus, they all demand that students use and apply critical skills and knowledge to demonstrate understanding.

This ten-week course will focus on the wise implementation of performance assessments and the use of student work products to inform task design and subsequent instruction. Course activities include selecting and adapting a performance assessment to be used in a specific course, implementing that task, and evaluating student work to learn more about the task and students' learning. We will use a learning-centered approach where assessments are not only about measuring learning, but are also events for learning.
The main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  • Select and adapt a high-quality performance task that is aligned with (and embedded within) a curricular unit of study;
  • Develop a set of considerations for effective implementation of performance tasks;
  • Begin to use data from performance tasks to tailor and improve instruction and curriculum;
  • Become familiar with freely-available resources that support the wise use of performance assessments in K-12 classrooms;
  • Contribute to building a community of educators focused on using performance-based assessments to identify and develop students' abilities.

More Information

This course is the second in a series and is open to those who participated in the first course and new participants. The first course, Designing for Deeper Learning: How to Develop Performance Tasks, focused on designing performance assessments and participants in that course designed a performance assessment that they can implement and evaluate in this course. For those who did not participate in that course, the initial sessions in this Implementing course will guide you in selecting and adapting a performance task for your local context.

This MOOC is designed for K-12 educators. We also welcome other educators and policymakers. It is recommended that participants currently teach or have access to a classroom where they can implement their chosen assessment. The target month for implementing that assessment is April 2017. However, there will be alternate options for those who are unable to implement during this month.

Participants will work collaboratively with other educators to accomplish learning goals and complete assignments. We encourage and welcome school, district, or region-based teams to participate and combine our online resources with in-person meetings. We call this a hybrid approach and you can find more information about that approach and our MOOCs here.

The Instructors

Daisy Martin

Director of History/Social Studies Learning at UL-SCALE

Daisy Martin's professional work focuses on the teaching and learning of historical thinking and literacy. She has co-created several digital projects that make research-based, high-quality teaching resources freely available, and has worked with teachers nationwide on designing and using curricula and performance-based assessments. Daisy is a co-founder of the Stanford History Education Group and co-led teachinghistory.org. Her current projects include researching challenges and successes faced by educators in implementing coherent performance assessment systems and working with history teachers in multiple states to design, implement, and learn from curriculum-embedded performance assessments. A former history and civics teacher, Daisy holds a doctorate from Stanford University and a BA in history/philosophy from the University of Michigan.

Ruth Chung Wei

Director of Assessment Research and Development at UL-SCALE

Ruth Chung Wei is currently Director of Assessment Research and Development at Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE), where she leads the design and research on performance-based assessments used in K-12 schools and in teacher education programs. Her current research is focused on the potential of performance assessments to serve as measures of student learning and growth, and the effectiveness of tools and protocols for improving the quality of teacher-designed performance assessments. A former secondary school teacher in the New York City public schools, Ruth Chung Wei completed her doctorate in education at Stanford University.

Designing for Deeper Learning

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Date: 
Monday, June 12, 2017
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OVERVIEW

Starts online June 12, 2017

At Stanford July 25-28, 2017

How is big data transforming our world and changing business, government, and civil society? Discover, through an interdisciplinary lens, how big data is creating new knowledge and value, as well as new privacy and security challenges. Start learning online and then come to Stanford for a three-day, immersive experience. On campus, you’ll interact with Stanford and Silicon Valley experts, explore a range of applications, and collaborate on case studies. (Application and fee apply.)

EXPLORE

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

FEATURED EXPERTS INCLUDE

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinski, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

COURSE SCHEDULE

Applications open: NOW

Start online: June 12, 2017

Come to Stanford: July 25-28, 2017

Online content closes: September 4, 2017

Early Registration
Discount, 10%
$4,950
(ends May 15, 2017)

Early Registration, 10%
Alum/Non-Profit/Gov, 15% 
$4,208
(ends May 15, 2017)

Team Discount, 10%(each)
For 3 or more people attending together.

___________________
Standard Fee
$5,500

Standard Alum/Non-Profit/Gov Discount, 15%
$4,675

All discounts will be applied during registration.

PLEASE CONTACT

worldview@stanford.edu

APPLY

https://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x24954618751

ABOUT WORLDVIEW STANFORD

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford, which creates interdisciplinary media and learning experiences to engage and inform the public.

Big Data

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Date: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 to Tuesday, May 30, 2017
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Course topic: 

Course Description

Formative assessment is an instructional practice to gauge where your students are in their learning by gathering evidence of their learning, assessing the evidence, and planning the next steps in instruction. The Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Mathematics, the Next Generation Science Standards, and new English Language Proficiency Standards all include a focus on argumentation, requiring that students construct claims supported by evidence and/or reasoning. In this course, we will explore how formative assessment practices can be targeted in improve student argumentation skills, an essential, cross-disciplinary practice.

Participants in this course will use a range of practical tools for gathering and analyzing language samples that show how students currently construct claims supported by evidence and/or reasoning, as well as identifying next steps in students' development. These tools support formative assessment and instructional planning. Focal topics include: articulating claims; linking evidence and/or reasoning to claims; and evaluating evidence and/or reasoning. We will also explore similarities and differences in argumentation across content areas and grade levels. This course will enable teachers to collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships that result in an online community focused on improving students' abilities to engage in argumentation across content areas. This course is offered jointly by Stanford University and Oregon State University.

Course Objectives

The main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  1. Recognize and engage in the essential components of formative assessment
  2. Develop a practical understanding of argumentation
  3. Use the entire formative assessment process to focus on language to help ELLs develop argumentation skills
  4. Use Argumentation Analysis Tool to analyze student arguments, focusing on structure and language us
  5. Learn and implement teaching strategies for building students' capacities for argumentation
  6. Collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships

Course Organization

This MOOC is organized around four sessions. The content for each session will become available on a particular date.

  • Session 1: Introduction to the formative assessment process and how to focus on language while practicing formative assessment
  • Session 2: Argumentation, its role in the new standards and associated language demands
  • Session 3: Using the formative assessment process to interpret students' argumentation skills
  • Session 4: Implementing and adjusting instructional strategies to improve student argumentation

For each of these sessions, course participants will be asked to complete a series of tasks such as watching videos, reading articles or book chapters, and completing individual and team assignments. For the sequencing of the course to be effective, the tasks for Session 1 must be completed before Session 2 begins, and so on. Yet unlike a traditional classroom, there is no specific time or day that participants must log on or "attend" class; participants are free to complete the session tasks at their own pace as long as they finish them in the allotted time.

    More Information

    Frequently Asked Questions

    1. How much does the course cost?

    The course is offered free of charge.

    2. Are any materials or textbooks needed for this course?

    You will be asked to complete readings as part of the course, but all required readings will be available for free via the course website. Several of the optional readings will also be free to participants and available online. To access additional optional readings online, participants may need to pay a small fee for copyright royalties to authors and publishers. Details about how to access these optional readings will be available via the course website.

    3. How do I show my school that I completed this course?

    Every participant who completes the course requirements will receive a free statement of accomplishment signed by the instructors. As to whether this free statement of accomplishment may be used for professional development units in your specific context, you would need to check with your employer. Specific requirements for receiving a statement of accomplishment will be available when the course begins.

    4. Do I have to be a teacher to take this course? Who else might be participating in this course?

    You do not have to be a teacher to take this course. The course may also be valuable to ELL coaches, teacher educators, and site and district administrators, among others. In order to fully participate in the course, however, you do need to have access to a classroom in which you can obtain student language samples and implement lessons (or collaborate with classroom teachers to obtain student language samples and implement lessons). This is because several of the course assignments require submitting language samples - either samples of student writing or brief transcriptions of students' oral language - and reflecting on lessons.

    5. Are there any tests or assignments?

    The course will be organized into four sessions. Within each session, you will have one assignment to complete. In general, the course follows a cycle of inquiry approach in which you gather data about student language (specifically, samples of language students used when constructing a claim supported by evidence) implement a lesson based on your insights about student language, reflect on that lesson, and repeat the cycle again. In addition, you will provide feedback to your peers about their work.

    6. If I complete the entire course, how long should I plan on spending in the course and on coursework each week?

    We anticipate that the course will take approximately 30 hours of time to complete. The course will be organized into four sessions, each spanning approximately three weeks. We anticipate that each session will take approximately 7-8 hours to complete, spread out over the approximately three week time span.

    7. Is the course self-paced? Can I work ahead?

    Some aspects of the course, such as readings and lecture videos, you can complete at your own pace. Within each of the four coursesessions you can largely work at your own pace, but you cannot work ahead on future sessions. Because several assignments center around providing feedback to peers and collaboratively creating a lesson plan with your team, you will need to coordinate some aspects of your work with your teammates.

    The Instructors

     

    Sara Rutherford-Quach

    Lecturer in the Stanford Graduate School of Education

    Sara Rutherford-Quach is the Director of Academic Programs & Research for Understanding Language and a Lecturer in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. A former bilingual elementary teacher, Sara has more than 13 years of experience working with linguistically diverse students and their teachers and has conducted extensive research on instructional practices for English learners. Sara was previously awarded a National Academy of Education Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for her work on the role of silence and speech in an elementary classroom serving language-minority students. Her areas of interest include classroom discourse and interaction analysis; language, culture, and instruction in multilingual and multicultural educational environments; institutional, policy and curricular change; and educational equity.

    Karen Thompson

    Assistant Professor, College of Education, Oregon State University

    Dr. Karen Thompson is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics from Stanford University and an M.A. in Education from the University of California, Berkeley, where she also earned an elementary bilingual teaching credential. Prior to entering academia, Dr. Thompson spent more than a decade working with English language learners in California public schools as a bilingual teacher, after-school program coordinator, and school reform consultant. Her research focuses on how policy, curriculum, and instruction interact to shape the experiences of English language learners in U.S. schools.

    Steven Weiss

    Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, Stanford ELL Leadership Network

    Steven Weiss is a Senior Research Associate at Understanding Language/Scale and the Project Manager for the Stanford ELL Leadership Network, a collaboration between seven small to medium sized school districts in Northern California focused on developing leadership capacity around English Language Learners. Prior to joining Understanding Language, he worked at the Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) program at WestEd, where he was a professional developer and instructional coach for secondary teachers and administrators in urban school districts such as New York City, Austin, San Diego and San Jose. He has also worked as a K-8 school administrator, a bilingual/ESL resource teacher, and a high school Spanish/History/ESL teacher. Steven is bilingual in Spanish. He holds an M.Ed. from U.C.L.A., an M.A. in Educational Administration from San Francisco State University, and an M.A. in Spanish from Middlebury College.

     

    Stanford University Graduate School of Education and Oregon State University

     

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