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Education

Open Knowledge: Changing the Global Course of Learning

Date: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 to Friday, December 12, 2014
Course topic: 

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Open source, open science, open data, open access, open education, open learning -- this course provides an introduction to the important concept of openness from a variety of perspectives, including education, publishing, librarianship, economics, politics, and more, and asks you to discover what it means to you. Open Knowledge is international and multi-institutional, bringing together instructors and students from Canada, Ghana, Mexico, the United States, and the rest of the world. It will challenge you take control of your own education, to determine your own personal learning objectives, to contribute to the development of the curriculum, to reflect on your progress, to learn new digital skills, and to take a leadership role in the virtual classroom. It will also provide you with the opportunity to connect with colleagues from different countries and professions, and to better understand areas where your interests overlap and where unexpected distincts exist. We hope you’ll consider taking this journey with us.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Introduction to Open Knowledge
Week 2: Technological Change, Digital Identity, and Connected Learning
Week 3: Participatory Culture, Citizen Journalism, Citizen Science
Week 4: Intellectual Property, Copyright, and the Economics of Open
Week 5: Historical Perspectives: Learned Publishing from Medieval to Modern Times
Week 6: Open Science, Data, Access, Source, Review
Week 7: Open Educational Resources: From Lesson Plans to Instructional Videos
Week 8: Archives, Databases, Encyclopedia: Evaluating Open Collections and Reference Sources
Week 9: Scholarly Publishing and Communications: Journals, Books, and Publication of Research
Week 10: Information Literacy: Overload, Filters, and Developing a Critical Lens
Week 11: Global Perspectives on Equity, Development, and Open Knowledge
Week 12: Student Publishing: Lessons in Publishing, Peer Review, and Knowledge Sharing
Week 13: The Future of Open Knowledge

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course.

FAQ: 

Why should I take this course?

The course will be a global conversation on openness that cuts across borders, cultures, disciplines, and professions. It will help prepare you in becoming an informed, critical, and connected digital citizen, actively participating in the consumption and production of the world's knowledge.

How much of a time commitment will this course be?

You will be able to choose from a sliding scale of participation that best meets your learning needs, ranging from about 1 hour per week up to 8 hours per week.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

There is no textbook for this course. All readings will be freely available, either on the course website or through open, online resources. An important student responsibility will be to discover and share additional materials to collaboratively build the full resource list for the course.

Will the weekly module content be available after the course formally ends?

Yes, the instructors are committed to keeping the weekly modules openly available, although the forums will not be monitered.

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

Yes, students will be eligible for a statement of accomplishment.

COURSE FACILITATORS

John Willinsky

John Willinsky is Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford University and Professor (Limited Term) of Publishing Studies at Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Public Knowledge Project, which conducts research and develops scholarly publishing software intended to extend the reach and effectiveness of scholarly communication. His books include the Empire of Words: The Reign of the OED (Princeton, 1994); Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End (Minnesota, 1998); Technologies of Knowing (Beacon 2000); and The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship (MIT Press, 2006).

Arianna Becerril García

Arianna (@ariannabec) is Professor of Computer Sciences, Applied Software, and Statistics at the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM). She is Director of Information Technologies in the Network of Scientific Journals of Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal (Redalyc.org). Arianna is currently studying for her doctorate in Computer Sciences at the Tecnológico de Estudios Superios de Monterrey in Mexico. Her master’s degree is in Computer Sciences from the same institution, and her bachelor’s degree is in Computer Engineering from the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico. She is a certified programmer by Sun Microsystems.

Arianna is member of the international advisory board of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). She has published various articles in international journals and three reports on the scientific output of different countries. She has participated in several international conferences. Her research areas are applied technologies in scientific communication and dissemination, scientometrics, data mining, ontologies, among others.

Samuel Smith Esseh

Smith Esseh is the Head of the Publishing Studies Department at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi, Ghana, has conducted research on journal publishing in Africa, and delivered publishing workshops across the continent.

Lauren Maggio

Lauren (@LaurenMaggio) is the Director of Research and Instruction at Stanford University’s medical library. Lauren has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science and a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature from the University of British Columbia School of Library and Information Science. Lauren is currently completing her PhD in Health Professions Education in a joint program at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. Her research focuses on effectively connecting people with information through the design of information literacy education and facilitating public access to knowledge. Check out some of here publications here. She looks forward to connecting with all of you and exploring the changing frontier of knowledge together this fall.

Bozena Mierzejewska

Bozena I. Mierzejewska (@bozemie) is an Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Management at Fordham University, New York, USA.

Dr. Mierzejewska holds an M.A. in Economics from Warsaw School of Economics in Poland, and earned her Ph.D. in management at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland. Her research and teaching focuses on media management and digitalisation and its impact on media organizations and media workers. She also studies the economic and management aspects of scholarly communication, in particular business models and strategies of academic journals. Bozena is a co-editor of JMM – The International Journal on Media Management and serves on editorial boards of several academic journals.

Kevin Stranack

Kevin (@stranack) works with the Simon Fraser University Library’s Public Knowledge Project, leading its community services and learning initiatives. He is also an adjunct faculty member at UBC's iSchool and SFU's Publishing Program. In addition, he is a student in the PhD program (Educational Technology and Learning Design) with SFU’s Faculty of Education. Kevin has a Master of Library and Information Studies from UBC and a Master of Adult Education from the University of Regina and his research interests include online community building, the role of dialogue in education, and methods for facilitating student self-determined learning within formal education contexts. He is also a member of the international advisory board of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).

How to Learn Math: For Students

Date: 
Tuesday, June 17, 2014

How to Learn Math is a class for learners of all levels of mathematics. It combines really important information on the brain and learning with new evidence on the best ways to approach and learn math effectively. Many people have had negative experiences with math, and end up disliking math or failing. This class will give learners of math the information they need to become powerful math learners, it will correct any misconceptions they have about what math is, and it will teach them about their own potential to succeed and the strategies needed to approach math effectively. If you have had past negative experiences with math this will help change your relationship to one that is positive and powerful.

The course will feature Jo and a team of undergraduates, as well as videos of math in action - in dance, juggling, snowflakes, soccer and many other applications. It is designed with a pedagogy of active engagement.The course will run from May/June to the end of December, 2014.

CONCEPTS

Part 1: The Brain and Math Learning.

  1. Knocking Down the Myths About Math.

    Everyone can learn math well. There is no such thing as a “math person”. This session give stunning new evidence on brain growth, and consider what it means for math learners.

  2. Math and Mindset

    When individuals change their mindset from fixed to growth their learning potential increases drastically. In this session participants will be encouraged to develop a growth mindset for math.

  3. Mistakes and Speed

    Recent brain evidence shows the value of students working on challenging work and even making mistakes. But many students are afraid of mistakes and think it means they are not a math person. This session will encourage students to think positively about mistakes. It will also help debunk myths about math and speed.

Part 2: Strategies for Success.

  1. Number Flexibility, Mathematical Reasoning, and Connections

    In this session participants will engage in a “number talk” and see different solutions of number problems to understand and learn ways to act on numbers flexibility. Number sense is critical to all levels of math and lack of number sense is the reason that many students fail courses in algebra and beyond. Participants will also learn about the value of talking, reasoning, and making connections in math.

  2. Number Patterns and Representations

    In this session participants will see that math is a subject that is made up of connected, big ideas. They will learn about the value of sense making, intuition, and mathematical drawing. A special section on fractions will help students learn the big ideas in fractions and the value of understanding big ideas in math more generally.

  3. Math in Life, Nature and Work

    In this session participants will see math as something valuable, exciting, and present throughout life. They will see mathematical patterns in nature and in different sports, exploring in depth the mathematics in dance and juggling. This session will review the key ideas from the course and help participants take the important strategies and ideas they have learned into their future.
FAQ: 

Who is this course for?

This course is designed for any learner of math and anyone who wants to improve their relationship with math. The ideas should be understandable by students of all levels of mathematics.

Parents who have children under age 13 and who think their children would benefit from some of the course materials should register themselves (i.e., parent's name, email, username) for the course. The parent may then choose to share course materials with their child at their own discretion.

What is the course structure?

The course will consist of six short lessons, taking approximately 20 minutes each. The lessons will combine presentations from Dr. Boaler and a team of undergraduates, interviews with members of the public, cutting edge research ideas, interesting visuals and films, and explorations of math in nature, sport and design.

What is the pace of the course?

The course will be self-paced, and you can start and end the course at any time in the months it is open. It is recommended that you take no more than one session a week, to allow the ideas to be processed and understood.

How will I be assessed?

There will be no formal assessment. Participants will be asked to complete a pre-and post-survey. The course will include quizzes that combine opportunities to write, work on math and reflect. These will not be graded.

Does this course carry any kind of Stanford University credit?

No.

Instructor(s): 
Jo Boaler
Mathematical Thinking image

Learning from Your Students: A Lab Course in Formative Assessment Practice in the Era of the Common Core State Standards

Date: 
Tuesday, May 6, 2014 to Monday, June 30, 2014
Course topic: 

Formative assessment is an instructional practice to gauge where your students are in their learning by gathering evidence of their learning, assessing the evidence, and planning the next steps in instruction. The language produced by your students, whether that language is in oral or written form, constitutes a key piece of evidence.

This course is intended for school-based instructional coaches and leaders who support teachers. It will help coaches and instructional leaders to work collaboratively with teachers to make systematic observations of student oral and written language in their classrooms. This is a lab course, in the sense that the learning will come from gathering systematic evidence, analyzing it, and sharing it with your peers in the course. Through the lab course, participants will have the opportunity to collect and explore four major components of formative assessment practice: clarifying intended learning, eliciting evidence, interpreting evidence, and acting on evidence.

This course will connect formative assessment practice to the key language practices that undergird the Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. These new standards in particular emphasize high quality student-to-student discourse, engaging with the reasoning of others, and writing with claims and evidence.

The course will consist of three sessions: (1) introductory materials on formative assessment and an assignment to collect student language, (2) self and peer analysis of the language sample in small teams, and (3) collaborative reflection and synthesis of the analyses.
 
The teacher-coaches and school leaders who participate in this course also will be helping the Stanford team to develop a more elaborate set of courses on formative assessment practice, to be offered next Fall (2014). Those course will be geared directly for teachers, with optional participation of their coaches. The samples collected in this lab course will become real-life illustrative examples for those courses, and we will also be inviting the teacher-coaches and school instructional leaders taking the current MOOC to enroll their teachers in the fall course to develop their expertise in formative assessment as it relates to the CCSS.

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The total estimated work for this lab course is 10-15 hours.

There will be a paid option to receive a "Record of Completion," which will list professional development hours and a narrative evaluation.

Satisfactory completion of this course is equivalent to 15 hours of professional development. The price for the record of completion is $100.

Instructor(s): 
Kenji Hakuta
Design for Deeper Learning

Mastering Language for the Common Core State Standards: Focus on Mathematics in Elementary Grades

Date: 
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Course topic: 

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics are notable for raising the rigor of student language demands during math instruction. Students are expected to understand complex problems, engage in constructive classroom conversations about math, and clearly support their reasoning with evidence.

In this course teachers will be provided with a range of practical tools for gathering and analyzing language samples that show how students learn and what supports they need in elementary math classrooms. These tools can support formative assessment and instructional planning. Focal topics include developing students' language for engaging in the eight Common Core mathematical practices, fostering constructive conversations, and communicating evidence and reasoning. This course will also enable teachers to collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships that result in an online community focused on improving students’ abilities to use rich academic language to learn and show learning of mathematical skills and concepts.

While the course is intended specifically for those who teach English learners and students with disabilities, the content of this course is equally applicable to teaching all students who are challenged by the academic uses of language in math instruction.

Instructor(s): 
Kenji Hakuta
Constructive Classroom image

Constructive Classroom Conversations: Mastering Language for the Common Core State Standards (Secondary)

Date: 
Thursday, March 6, 2014 to Thursday, May 29, 2014
Course topic: 

The Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards emphasize improving the quality of student-to-student discourse as a major feature of instruction. The new standards specifically describe the importance of students understanding the reasoning of others and engaging in meaningful conversations using evidence for claims. Yet this type of student-to-student interaction tends to be rare in classrooms. Common classroom teaching activities such as whole class discussions, jigsaws, and think-pair-shares can have the appearance of constructive interactions, but they often do not provide adequate opportunities for all students to engage in back-and-forth dialog. This short course looks closely at student-to-student conversations and addresses ways to improve students' abilities to engage in the types of interactions described in the new standards.

This course consists of four sessions with three weeks between each session in order to provide extra time for application and reflection. The learning in this course relies heavily on participant contributions and comments. The sessions and assignments are designed for participants who teach or have access to classrooms in which they can gather samples of students’ conversation during lessons. Finally, we include resources and tasks for instructional coaches and others who support teachers and build school-wide capacity.

Please note that this is a slightly modified version of a previous course offered in Fall, 2013. This course is targeted towards secondary school teachers. 

We hope you will join us on this exciting journey.

Instructor(s): 
Kenji Hakuta
Constructive Classroom image

Constructive Classroom Conversations: Mastering Language for the Common Core State Standards (Elementary)

Date: 
Thursday, March 6, 2014 to Thursday, May 29, 2014
Course topic: 

The Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards emphasize improving the quality of student-to-student discourse as a major feature of instruction. The new standards specifically describe the importance of students understanding the reasoning of others and engaging in meaningful conversations using evidence for claims. Yet this type of student-to-student interaction tends to be rare in classrooms. Common classroom teaching activities such as whole class discussions, jigsaws, and think-pair-shares can have the appearance of constructive interactions, but they often do not provide adequate opportunities for all students to engage in back-and-forth dialog. This short course looks closely at student-to-student conversations and addresses ways to improve students' abilities to engage in the types of interactions described in the new standards.

This course consists of four sessions with three weeks between each session in order to provide extra time for application and reflection. The learning in this course relies heavily on participant contributions and comments. The sessions and assignments are designed for participants who teach or have access to classrooms in which they can gather samples of students’ conversation during lessons. Finally, we include resources and tasks for instructional coaches and others who support teachers and build school-wide capacity.

Please note that this is a slightly modified version of a previous course offered in Fall, 2013. This course is targeted towards elementary school teachers. 

We hope you will join us on this exciting journey.

Instructor(s): 
Kenji Hakuta
Constructive Classroom image

Designing for Deeper Learning: How to Develop Performance Tasks for the Common Core

Date: 
Monday, September 8, 2014
Course topic: 

The Course

Given their emphasis on complex and sophisticated disciplinary skills and understandings, the Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards require ways of assessing that go beyond routine multiple-choice tests. Whether students are learning to select, use, and explain evidence to support a claim or to analyze data to evaluate a hypothesis, tests that require that students only bubble in a scantron are inadequate to measure (or support) students’ learning and growth. Performance assessments are more suited to this task. Performance-based tasks require that students create and produce rather than recall and regurgitate. While performance assessments vary along multiple dimensions, including duration and focus, they all demand that students use and apply critical skills and knowledge to demonstrate understanding.

This nine-week course will focus on building educators’ capacity to use, develop, and implement curriculum-embedded performance assessments that fit local contexts. Course activities include evaluating sample performance tasks and developing and implementing a performance task that is aligned with a specific curricular unit and performance outcomes. We will use a learning-centered approach where assessments are not only about measuring learning, but are also events for learning.

This MOOC is designed for grade 6-12 teachers working in the core disciplines of mathematics, language arts, history/social studies, and science. It is recommended that participants currently teach or have access to a classroom for which they can design a performance assessment and then implement that assessment. Participants will work collaboratively with other educators in their discipline to accomplish course learning goals and assignments.

The four main objectives of this course are for participants to:

  • Understand and identify features of high quality performance assessments;
  • Develop a grade-level, course-specific, practical, performance task that is aligned with (and embedded within) a curricular unit of study;
  • Begin to use data from performance tasks to tailor and improve instruction and curriculum;
  • Contribute to building an online community of educators focused on using performance-based assessments to identify and develop students’ abilities.

This nine-week course will include video presentations, required readings, and homework activities. For each of the eight core sessions, students can expect to spend a total of 2-4 hours weekly watching videos, reading, completing assignments, and collaborating with peers.  The ninth week will allow students to complete and submit their final project.

We encourage, and will support collaborative teams of educators in the course. Students can join the class with an existing team, or will create and join teams once the class has started.

Upon successful completion of the required assignments, students will earn a "Statement of Accomplishment" from NovoEd.

Instructors

Raymond L. Pecheone

Professor of Practice at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University and Executive Director of the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE)

Raymond Pecheone is Professor of Practice at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University and Executive Director of the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE). SCALE focuses on the development of innovative performance assessments for students, teachers, and administrators at the school, district and state levels. Over the course of his career, Dr. Pecheone has been a leader in high stakes educational reform through assessment, research and policy work. Currently, Dr. Pecheone and SCALE are developing the performance assessment specifications and tasks for the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) national assessment system that will be used by up to 22 states.

Daisy Martin

Director of History/Social Studies Performance Assessment at SCALE

Daisy Martin is Director of History/Social Studies Performance Assessment at SCALE. Her professional work focuses on the teaching and learning of historical thinking and literacy. She has co-created several digital projects that make research-based, high quality teaching resources freely available, and has worked with teachers nationwide on designing and using curricula and performance-based assessments. Daisy’s current projects include researching challenges and successes faced by educators in implementing coherent performance assessment systems, and working with history teachers in multiple states to design, implement, and learn from common units of study. A former history and civics teacher, Daisy holds a doctorate from Stanford University and a BA in history/philosophy from the University of Michigan.

Ruth Chung Wei

Director of Assessment Research and Development at SCALE

Ruth Chung Wei is currently Director of Assessment Research and Development at the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE), where she leads the design and research on performance-based assessments used in K-12 schools and in teacher education programs. Her current research is focused on the potential of performance assessments to serve as measures of student learning and growth, and the effectiveness of tools and protocols for improving the quality of teacher-designed performance assessments. A former secondary school teacher in the New York City public schools, Ruth Chung Wei completed her doctorate in education at Stanford University.

Design for Deeper Learning

Constructive Classroom Conversations: Mastering the Language of the Common Core State Standards

Date: 
Monday, October 21, 2013 to Monday, December 9, 2013
Course topic: 

The Common Core State Standards for English ELA and Mathematics emphasize improving the quality of student-to-student discourse as a major feature of instruction.  The new standards specifically describe the importance of students understanding the reasoning of others and engaging in meaningful conversations using evidence for claims. Yet this type of student-to-student discourse tends to be rare in classrooms. Common classroom activities such as whole class discussions, jigsaws, and think-pair-shares, can have the appearance of constructive interactions, but they often do not provide adequate opportunities for all students to engage in academically rich, back-and-forth dialogs.    

This short course looks closely at student-to-student discourse and addresses how to facilitate student engagement in the types of interactions required by the new standards. It organizes a massive collaboration of educators who wish to support students, particularly English Language Learners, to co-create and build upon each other’s ideas as they interact with the content.  Starting with the notion that in order to improve the quality of student discourse, educators need to listen closely to existing talk, the course asks participants to gather, analyze, and share examples of student conversations from their classrooms. The overall goal is for participating educators to better understand student-student classroom discourse and use what they learn to facilitate higher quality interactions that build disciplinary knowledge and skills. 

The four main objectives of this course are for participants to: 

  1. Develop a practical understanding of academically-engaged classroom discourse, with emphasis on what this looks like in linguistically diverse classrooms that are focused on teaching Common Core State Standards;
  2. Listen more carefully to student talk and use a discourse analysis tool to analyze student discourse, focusing on how interactions build disciplinary language, knowledge, and skills.
  3. Learn and practice practical teaching strategies for building students’ abilities to engage in constructive face-to-face interactions;
  4. Collaborate with other educators and build professional relationships that result in an online community focused on improving students’ abilities to engage rich academic discourse across disciplines and grade levels.

Prerequisites

In order to participate in the course, you will need to have access to a classroom in which you or the teacher you are observing are able to collect short samples of paired student talk two different times. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

This course may be taken for a free statement of accomplishment.

How much of the time commitment will this course be?

Online work will take around 1 hour per week; assignments will take around 1 hour per week.

Any additional textbooks or software required?

No.

Syllabus

Weeks 1-2: Constructive Conversations I

In these two weeks we dive into what high-quality talk between students can sound like in lessons that effectively teach the new standards. Specifically, we focus on the features of “constructive interactions,” during which students create, clarify, support, and negotiate ideas as they talk about concepts and build understandings in a discipline. 

Weeks 3-4: Teaching the Constructive Conversation Skills 

These two weeks focus on instruction to support rich interaction introduced in Module 1. We analyze video clips that show teaching that fosters interaction skills described in the new standards. We look at activities that help students build interactions skills for staying focused on objectives, building and negotiating ideas, and clarifying ideas. 

Weeks 5-6: Constructive Conversations II

These two weeks we will look more in depth at how to foster student interactions that build the learning of lesson objectives, challenge thinking, and push students to use more complex language of the Common Core standards. 

Week 7: Collaboration, Communication, and Community

This will be a summative week, when we will pull together everything we’ve covered in the course to create a product that communicates to other teachers the value of having a discourse focus for implementing the new standards. You will also consider next steps for applying and collaborating in this work during the year.

Instructor(s): 
Kenji Hakuta
Jeff Zwiers
Sara Rutherford-Quach
Constructive Classroom image

How to Learn Math

Date: 
Monday, July 15, 2013
Course topic: 

In July 2013 a new course will be available on Stanford’s free on-line platform. The course is a short intervention designed to change students’ relationships with math. I have taught this intervention successfully in the past (in classrooms); it caused students to re-engage successfully with math, taking a new approach to the subject and their learning.

In the 2013-2014 school year the course will be offered to learners of math but in July of 2013 I will release a version of the course designed for teachers and other helpers of math learners, such as parents. In the teacher/parent version I will share the ideas I will present to students and hold a conversation with teachers and parents about the ideas. There will also be sessions giving teachers/parents particular strategies for achieving changes in students and opportunities for participants to work together on ideas through the forum pages. The ideas I will share will be really helpful as teachers prepare to implement the new Common Core State Standards.

CONCEPTS

1. Knocking down the myths about math.
Math is not about speed, memorization or learning lots of rules. There is no such thing as “math people” and non-math people. Girls are equally capable of the highest achievement. This session will include interviews with students.

2. Math and Mindset.
Participants will be encouraged to develop a growth mindset, they will see evidence of how mindset changes students’ learning trajectories, and learn how it can be developed.

3. Mistakes, Challenges & Persistence.

What is math persistence? Why are mistakes so important? How is math linked to creativity? This session will focus on the importance of mistakes, struggles and persistence.

4. Teaching Math for a Growth Mindset.

This session will give strategies to teachers and parents for helping students develop a growth mindset and will include an interview with Carol Dweck.

5. Conceptual Learning. Part I. Number Sense.
Math is a conceptual subject– we will see evidence of the importance of conceptual thinking and participants will be given number problems that can be solved in many ways and represented visually.

6. Conceptual Learning. Part II. Connections, Representations, Questions.
In this session we will look at and solve math problems at many different grade levels and see the difference in approaching them procedurally and conceptually. Interviews with successful users of math in different, interesting jobs (film maker, inventor of self-driving cars etc) will show the importance of conceptual math.

7. Appreciating Algebra.
Participants will learn some key research findings in the teaching and learning of algebra and learn about a case of algebra teaching.

8. Going From This Course to a New Mathematical Future.
This session will review the ideas of the course and think about the way towards a new mathematical future.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course.

FAQ: 

Whom is this course for?

This course is for teachers of math (K-12) or for other helpers of students, such as parents. After the summer I will release a student version of this course. This course provides an opportunity for teachers and parents to preview the ideas for students and think about how they may be useful, as well as learn from new research ideas and share ideas with other teachers and parents who enroll in the course.

What is the course structure?

The course will consist of eight short sessions, your watching /listening time will be 10-15 minutes per session. In those sessions I will combine some videos of me, interviews with students, cutting edge research ideas, interesting visuals, and some peer and self-assessments. The course will also include interviews with some of the world’s leading thinkers, such as Sebastian Thrun (Udacity/Google) and Carol Dweck (expert on mindset). If you engage with the materials actively, thinking and writing about teaching and learning, I anticipate that each session will take you somewhere between 1 and 2 hours.

What is the pace of the course?

The course will launch on July 15th, a good pace may be to take 2 sessions per week, but you can choose your own pace. The course will close on September 27th, 2013.

How will I be assessed?

Those who finish the course will receive a statement of accomplishment. During the course there will be no grades given. Occasionally you will be asked to complete a self or peer assessment. These are intended to help your learning, not to grade you.

Can I collaborate with other teachers/parents?

It will be ideal if you can take this course with others, and discuss the ideas together. There will also be opportunities to engage in discussions through the forum pages, and to share good ideas for teaching.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

You do not need to buy a textbook. My book “What’s Math Got To Do With It?” Penguin, 2009 (for the USA) or “The Elephant in the Classroom” Souvenir Press, 2010 (for the UK) will allow you to go into greater depth on some of the ideas.

Can I get professional development hours from my district if I take this course?

This is entirely at the discretion of your school district but a number of districts have said that they will be providing 16 professional development hours to their teachers who complete the course - which means finishing the course and also completing all of the assigned tasks.

Does this course carry any kind of Stanford University credit?

No.

Instructor(s): 
Jo Boaler

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