Skip to content Skip to navigation

Engineering & Computer Science

Topic Image: 
Engineering and Computer Science
Date: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2016
Go to Course

[[{"type":"media","fid":"55161","view_mode":"teaser","link_text":null,"field_deltas":{},"attributes":{"alt":"Online Jamming And Concert Technology","height":"390","width":"640","class":"panopoly-image-video media-element file-teaser","data-delta":"1"},"fields":{}}]]

Course Description

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.

Schedule

Course runs October 4, 2016 - February 7, 2017

Session 1: Overview
Overview of Online Jamming and Concert Technology

Session 2: Basics And Setup
Basics: Network protocols, audio signals + soundcards and network audio.

Session 3: Jacktrip Application + Connection
Things that go wrong with Jacktrip: Network & Audio. P2P Sessions and Multi-site setups.

Session 4: Debugging
Debug examples of typical problems.

Session 5: Polish And Practice
Polish techniques and spawn more practice sessions.

Session 6: Future
Future of the art and practice of network audio, alternative platforms for network audio.

Instructor

Chris Chafe, Professor of Music and Director of CCRMA

    Chris Chafe is a composer, improviser, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance, and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's SoundWIRE project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software including jacktrip and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in dozens of countries and sometimes at novel venues. A simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe's works are available from Centaur Records and various online media. Gallery and museum music installations are into their second decade with "musifications" resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD's. Recent work includes the Brain Stethoscope project, PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

    Requirements

    Equipment: Computer (running Linux, OS X, or Windows) with installation privileges
    Software: JackTrip (plus Jack) and Audacity
    Wired Internet: at least 5Mbps download and upload

    Online Jamming and Concert Technology

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Date: 
    Tuesday, October 11, 2016
    Go to Course

    ABOUT THIS COURSE

    We begin with a study of finite automata and the languages they can define (the so-called "regular languages." Topics include deterministic and nondeterministic automata, regular expressions, and the equivalence of these language-defining mechanisms. We also look at closure properties of the regular languages, e.g., the fact that the union of two regular languages is also a regular language. We conssider decision properties of regular languages, e.g., the fact that there is an algorithm to tell whether or not the language defined by two finite automata are the same language. Finally, we see the pumping lemma for regular languages — a way of proving that certain languages are not regular languages.

    Our second topic is context-free grammars and their languages. We learn about parse trees and follow a pattern similar to that for finite automata: closure properties, decision properties, and a pumping lemma for context-free languages. We also introduce the pushdown automaton, whose nondeterministic version is equivalent in language-defining power to context-free grammars.

    Next, we introduce the Turing machine, a kind of automaton that can define all the languages that can reasonably be said to be definable by any sort of computing device (the so-called "recursively enumerable languages"). We shall learn how "problems" (mathematical questions) can be expressed as languages. That lets us define problems to be "decidable" if their language can be defined by a Turing machine and "undecidable" if not. We shall see some basic undecidable problems, for example, it is undecidable whether the intersection of two context-free languages is empty.

    Last, we look at the theory of intractable problems. These are problems that, while they are decidable, have almost certainly no algorithm that runs in time less than some exponential function of the size of their input. We meet the NP-complete problems, a large class of intractable problems. This class includes many of the hard combinatorial problems that have been assumed for decades or even centuries to require exponential time, and we learn that either none or all of these problems have polynomial-time algorithms. A common example of an NP-complete problem is SAT, the question of whether a Boolean expression has a truth-assignment to its variables that makes the expression itself true.

    REQUIREMENTS

    The primary prerequisite for this course is reasonable "mathematical sophistication." That is, you should feel comfortable with mathematics and proofs. Specific topics that are useful include a knowledge of graphs, trees, and logic, as well as basic data structures and algorithms.

    COURSE STAFF

    [[{"fid":"59531","view_mode":"media_original","fields":{"format":"media_original","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Jeffrey Ulman","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false},"type":"media","link_text":null,"field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"media_original","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Jeffrey Ulman","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false}},"attributes":{"alt":"Jeffrey Ulman","height":"356","width":"200","class":"media-element file-media-original","data-delta":"1"}}]]
    Jeffrey D. Ullman

    Jeff Ullman is a retired professor of Computer Science at Stanford. His home page offers additional information about the instructor.

    FAQ: 

    Do I need to buy a textbook?

    The class is self-contained, and you are not expected to purchase or steal a textbook. However, should you wish to do so, the textbook that matches the course most closely is Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation by Hopcroft, Motwani, and Ullman, Addison-Wesley, 2007.

    What should I do if I don't have the prerequisites?

    For this purpose, there is a free textbook Foundations of Computer Science.

    How much work is expected?

    The amount of work will vary, depending on your background and the ease with which you follow mathematical ideas. However, 10 hours per week is a good guess.

    Will statements of accomplishment be offered?

    Yes. You need to get 50% of the marks (roughly half for homework, half for the final). An SoA with Distinction requires 85% of the marks.

    Automata Theory

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Go to Course

    Coming Soon!

    ABOUT THIS COURSE

    This course is an introduction to Logic from a computational perspective. It shows how to encode information in the form of logical sentences; it shows how to reason with information in this form; and it provides an overview of logic technology and its applications - in mathematics, science, engineering, business, law, and so forth.

    The course was originally designed for use at the college level. However, experience has shown that it works for secondary school students as well, and it can be used at the start of graduate school for those who have not yet seen the material.

    PREREQUISITES

    There are just two prerequisites. The course presumes that the student understands sets and set operations, such as union, intersection, and so forth. It also presumes that the student is comfortable with symbolic manipulation, as used, for example, in solving high-school algebra problems. Nothing else is required.

    COURSE STAFF

    Michael Genesereth

    Michael Genesereth is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. He received his Sc.B. in Physics from M.I.T. and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. Prof. Genesereth is most known for his work on computational logic and applications of that work in enterprise computing, computational law, and general game playing. He has taught logic for many years at Stanford and offers an annual massive online course on logic that has reached over 500,000 students. He is the current director of the Logic Group at Stanford and founder and research director of CodeX (The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics).

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    Do I need to buy a textbook?

    No, the text Introduction to Logic is provided in the online material. However, you can purchase a printed version (published by Morgan-Claypool) if you’d like.

    Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment for this class?

    No. The Coursera Version of this course does not offer an S.O.A


    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Go to Course

    Application and fee apply.

    Overview

    Integrating computation, visualization and programming with MATLAB is a powerful approach to model and control systems. This course builds on the fundamentals of calculus to explore vector analysis techniques that are essential for engineers. Using examples drawn from various engineering fields, it introduces differential and integral vector calculus and linear algebra to analyze the effects of changing conditions on a system.

    Topics Include

    • Analytic geometry in space
    • Green's, divergence and Stokes' theorems
    • Integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates
    • Lagrange multipliers
    • Matrix operations
    • Partial derivatives
    • Unconstrained maxima and minima

    Instructors

    • Hung Le LecturerInstitute for Computational & Mathematical Eng.

    Units

    5.0

    Prerequisites

    10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math41 and 42.

    Vector Calculus

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Go to Course

    About this course: Popularized by movies such as "A Beautiful Mind," game theory is the mathematical modeling of strategic interaction among rational (and irrational) agents. Beyond what we call `games' in common language, such as chess, poker, soccer, etc., it includes the modeling of conflict among nations, political campaigns, competition among firms, and trading behavior in markets such as the NYSE. How could you begin to model keyword auctions, and peer to peer file-sharing networks, without accounting for the incentives of the people using them? The course will provide the basics: representing games and strategies, the extensive form (which computer scientists call game trees), Bayesian games (modeling things like auctions), repeated and stochastic games, and more. We'll include a variety of examples including classic games and a few applications. You can find a full syllabus and description of the course here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/GTOC-Syllabus.html There is also an advanced follow-up course to this one, for people already familiar with game theory: https://www.coursera.org/learn/gametheory2/ You can find an introductory video here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/Intro_Networks.mp4

    This course starts every five weeks. Next session begins October 10.

    Who is this class for: This course is aimed at students, researchers, and practitioners who wish to understand more about strategic interactions. You must be comfortable with mathematical thinking and rigorous arguments. Relatively little specific math is required; but you should be familiar with basic probability theory (for example, you should know what a conditional probability is), and some very light calculus would be helpful.

    Created by:   Stanford University, The University of British Columbia

    Instructors

    • Taught by:    Matthew O. Jackson, Professor

      Economics
    • Taught by:    Kevin Leyton-Brown, Professor

      Computer Science
    • Taught by:    Yoav Shoham, Professor

      Computer Science

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Go to Course

    About this course: Popularized by movies such as "A Beautiful Mind", game theory is the mathematical modeling of strategic interaction among rational (and irrational) agents. Over four weeks of lectures, this advanced course considers how to design interactions between agents in order to achieve good social outcomes. Three main topics are covered: social choice theory (i.e., collective decision making and voting systems), mechanism design, and auctions. In the first week we consider the problem of aggregating different agents' preferences, discussing voting rules and the challenges faced in collective decision making. We present some of the most important theoretical results in the area: notably, Arrow's Theorem, which proves that there is no "perfect" voting system, and also the Gibbard-Satterthwaite and Muller-Satterthwaite Theorems. We move on to consider the problem of making collective decisions when agents are self interested and can strategically misreport their preferences. We explain "mechanism design" -- a broad framework for designing interactions between self-interested agents -- and give some key theoretical results. Our third week focuses on the problem of designing mechanisms to maximize aggregate happiness across agents, and presents the powerful family of Vickrey-Clarke-Groves mechanisms. The course wraps up with a fourth week that considers the problem of allocating scarce resources among self-interested agents, and that provides an introduction to auction theory. You can find a full syllabus and description of the course here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/GTOC-II-Syllabus.html There is also a predecessor course to this one, for those who want to learn or remind themselves of the basic concepts of game theory: https://www.coursera.org/learn/game-theory-1 An intro video can be found here: http://web.stanford.edu/~jacksonm/Game-Theory-2-Intro.mp4

    This course starts every five weeks. The next session begins October 17.

    Who is this class for: This course is based on advanced undergraduate and masters level material and is aimed at researchers, students, and practitioners who wish to learn more about game theory and mechanism design. This course is a follow up to our first Game Theory course, and it presumes that the students are comfortable with the material from that course. You must be also comfortable with mathematical thinking and rigorous arguments. Relatively little specific math is required; however the course involves some probability theory (for example, you should know what a conditional probability is) and some calculus.

    Created by:   Stanford University, The University of British Columbia  


    Instructors

    • Matthew O. Jackson, Professor, Economics

    • Kevin Leyton-Brown, Professor, Computer Science

    • Yoav Shoham, Professor, Computer Science

    Game Theory II : Advanced Applications

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Date: 
    Tuesday, October 4, 2016 to Tuesday, December 13, 2016
    Go to Course

    [[{"fid":"59481","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default"},"type":"media","link_text":null,"field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"default"}},"attributes":{"alt":"Gov. Brown: take free online course on nuclear weapons","height":"390","width":"640","class":"panopoly-image-video media-element file-default","data-delta":"1"}}]]

    ABOUT THIS COURSE

    Living at the Nuclear Brink: An Introduction by Dr. William J. Perry

    I have been living at the nuclear brink for all of my adult life, and throughout my career in academia, private industry, and the U.S. government, I have dealt first-hand with the evolving nuclear threat. Nuclear weapons may seem like 20th century history, but the choices we make about these weapons in the 21st century will decide your future in truly fundamental ways. Because most people do not understand just how serious these dangers are today, their governments are not taking adequate preventive actions: actions that are readily achievable. And so, we are drifting towards a nuclear catastrophe. This is why I have dedicated the balance of my life to educate the public about these dangers, and this is the reason I have created this course. I have been joined in this effort by an outstanding and uniquely qualified group of educators and public servants who share my concerns about nuclear weapons.

    The key goals of this course are to warn you of the dangers you face and to give you some insight on what could be done to avoid those dangers. My challenge in this course is to make vivid to you that the dangers of nuclear weapons, far from being historical curiosities, are existential dangers today. You will have the opportunity to engage in discussions about these topics with both world experts and peers from around the globe.

    You can take this course any way you wish. To earn a Statement of Accomplishment, you will view all of the lectures, participate in weekly forums, and complete quizzes on the course content. We have organized the course segments in a logical order, both chronologically and thematically. However, each segment stands alone and can be viewed independently, and still be a useful experience, even if you do not seek a Statement of Accomplishment.

    The course differs from many others in a fundamental way: our goal is not just to provide facts for your education, but to inspire you to take action. You have the power to make a difference, and I believe that this course will give you the knowledge and motivation to do so. You can read more about this subject, and find ways to become involved, by visiting the website of the William J Perry Project: www.wjperryproject.org

    PREREQUISITES

    There are no prerequisites for this course except for curiosity in the subject and a passion for learning.

    COURSE OUTLINE

    Week 1: Introduction; What Are Nuclear Weapons and Why Were They Developed?

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. Joseph Martz; Dr. Siegfried Hecker

    Week 2: Nuclear Proliferation in the United States and Around the World

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. Joseph Martz; Dr. Siegfried Hecker

    Week 3: Under a Nuclear Cloud: Early Cold War

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. David Holloway

    Week 4: Fear and Loathing and Relief: Later Cold War

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. David Holloway

    Week 5: A Lack of Intelligence

    Dr. William J. Perry; Philip Taubman

    Week 6: Dilemmas of Nuclear Policy

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. Scott Sagan; Dr. David Holloway; Dr. Andre Kokoshin

    Week 7: New Nuclear Dangers: Nuclear Terrorism

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. Martha Crenshaw; Dr. Siegfried Hecker

    Week 8: New Nuclear Dangers: South Asia and Proliferation

    Dr. William J. Perry; Dr. Scott Sagan; Dr. Martha Crenshaw; Dr. Siegfried Hecker; Dr. Andre Kokoshin

    Week 9: What Has Been Done, and Can Be Done, about Nuclear Dangers

    Dr. William J. Perry; Amb. James Goodby; Secretary George Shultz

    Week 10: What Next?

    Dr. William J. Perry; Joseph Cirincione

    COURSE STAFF

    William J. Perry

    William J. Perry was the 19th Secretary of Defense for the United States, serving from February 1994 to January 1997. He previously served as Deputy Secretary of Defense (1993-1994) and as Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (1977-1981). Perry is the Michael and Barbara Berberian Professor (emeritus) at Stanford University. He is a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and the Hoover Institution, and he serves as Director of the Preventive Defense Project. In 2013, Perry founded the William J. Perry Project (www.wjperryproject.org) to engage and educate the public on the dangers of nuclear weapons in the 21st century.

    Joseph Cirincione

    Joseph Cirincione is the president of Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. He is the author Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late, Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons and is the author or editor of five other books on nuclear weapons and national security policy. He has also published hundreds of articles on these topics and is widely cited in the media. Mr. Cirincione serves on the Secretary of State’s International Security Advisory Board and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He worked for nine years in the U.S. House of Representatives on the professional staff of the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Government Operations.

    Martha Crenshaw

    Martha Crenshaw is a world-recognized expert on political terrorism and is a Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) and Freeman Spogli Institute (FSI) and a Professor of Political Science by courtesy at Stanford. In 2011, Routledge published Explaining Terrorism, a collection of her previously published writings.

    James Goodby

    James Goodby has had a long and distinguished career in the United States Foreign Service. He has received five presidential appointments at ambassadorial rank, and notably, he has been intimately involved as a negotiator and policy adviser in the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the negotiation of the limited nuclear test ban treaty, START, the Conference on Disarmament in Europe, and the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program.

    Siegfried Hecker

    Siegfried Hecker is one of the world’s experts on the Russian nuclear program, working with Russian nuclear laboratories to secure and safeguard the vast stockpile of ex-Soviet fissile materials. Dr. Hecker is a professor (research) in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford, a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, former Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and former co-director of Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation.

    David Holloway

    David Holloway is perhaps the world’s expert on the development of the Soviet nuclear program and has published widely on this subject; his book Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956 (Yale University Press, 1994) was chosen by the New York Times Book Review as one of the 11 best books of 1994. Dr. Holloway is the Raymond A. Spruance Professor of International History, a Professor of Political Science, and an Freeman Spogli Institute Senior Fellow.

    Andre Kokoshin

    Andre Kokoshin has held many positions in the Russian government, including Deputy Minister of Defense from 1992 to 1997, when he played a key role in the implementation of the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program. He is currently a member of the Russian Duma; he holds a Ph.D. in History and is an associate member of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

    Joseph Martz

    Joseph Martz is a physicist and employee Los Alamos National Laboratory with a 25+ year career focused on issues surrounding nuclear security, nuclear weapons, and stockpile stewardship. In addition to his research at Los Alamos, he has led national project teams including the recent reliable-replacement warhead design competition and several complex nuclear material experiments.

    Scott D. Sagan

    Scott D. Sagan is widely-recognized expert on nuclear security issues; his books in this area include The Limits of Safety: Organizations, Accidents, and Nuclear Weapons (Princeton University Press, 1993), and with co-author Kenneth N. Waltz, The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: An Enduring Debate (W.W. Norton, 2012). Dr. Sagan is the Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science, the Mimi and Peter Haas University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University.

    George Shultz

    George Shultz has had a highly distinguished career in government, academia, and the world of business: he has held four different federal cabinet posts; he has taught at three of this country’s great universities; and for eight years he was President of Bechtel, a major engineering and construction company. He is current Professor of International Economics at the Graduate School of Business and a Distinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford.

    Philip Taubman

    Philip Taubman was a reporter and editor at the New York Times for nearly 30 years, specializing in national security issues; he published Secret Empire: Eisenhower, the CIA, and the Hidden Story of America's Space Espionage in 2004, and The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb in 2012. He is currently a Consulting Professor at CISAC, and also serves as Stanford Associate Vice President for University Affairs, working on special projects for Stanford's president, John Hennessy.

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    The course already started! Is it too late to join?

    No worries! You can start whenever you join the course. However, we will be having a number of interactive sessions throughout the course, so it is worthwhile to “catch up” so that you can participate knowledgeably in these sessions.

    How do a earn a Statement of Accomplishment?

    If you are interested in receiving a Statement of Accomplishment from Stanford University at the end of this course, please note that you must complete the following:

    Reflective Writing: Each week, you will answer a "thought question" about what you are learning and how it applies to your own beliefs about nuclear weapons.

    Short Quizzes: After each unit, there will be quiz question to help you gauge your learning. You will have two attempts to answer the question correctly and unlimited time.

    Gaining a score of at least 75% allows you to receive the Statement of Accomplishment.

    Please note that a Statement of Accomplishment is optional. We welcome all participants to this course, whether you seek a Statement of Accomplishment or not.

    Is there a textbook for the class?

    No, but there will be suggested readings for each unit.

    Living at the Brink

    View All Courses

    Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

    Date: 
    Tuesday, September 20, 2016 to Tuesday, January 24, 2017
    Go to Course

    About the Course

    This course introduces the basics of Digital Signal Processing and computational acoustics, motivated by the vibrational physics of real-world objects and systems. We will build from a simple mass-spring and pendulum to demonstrate oscillation, learn how to simulate those systems in the computer, and also prove that these simple oscillations behave as a sine wave. From that we move to plucked strings and struck bars, showing both solutions as combined traveling waves and combined sine wave harmonics. We continue to build and simulate more complex systems containing many vibrating objects and resonators (stringed instruments, drum, plate), and also learn how to simulate echos and room reverberation. Through this process, we will learn about digital signals, filters, oscillators, harmonics, spectral analysis, linear and non-linear systems, particle models, and all the necessary building blocks to synthesize essentially any sound. The free open-source software provided will make it possible for anyone to use physical models in their art-making, game or movie sound, or any other application.

    SCHEDULE *

    Course runs until August 31, 2016

    Session 1: The Time Domain: Sound, Digital Audio, PCM Files, Noise Vs. Pitch, A Hint Of Spectra 
    a) Sound in Air, Traveling Waves b) Digital Audio, Sampling, Quantization, Aliasing c) Soundfiles, Wavetables, Manipulating PCM d) Pitch (vs. Noise), Spectral Analysis 0.1 e) Time-domain Pitch/Noise Detection: ZeroXings, AMDF, Autocorrelation
    Session 2: Physics, Oscillators, Sines & Spectra, Spectral/Additive Synthesis 
    a) Mass-Spring-Damper system, also simple Pendulum b) Fourier analysis/synthesis, Spectrum Analysis 1.0 c) More on additive Sine-wave synthesis
    Session 3: Digital Filters, Modal Synthesis 
    a) Digital Filters, Finite Impulse Response (FIR) b) Linearity, Time-invariance, Convolution c) Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) Digital Filters d) BiQuad Resonator Filter, Modal Synthesis
    Session 4: Physical Modeling Synthesis: 1D Systems 
    a) 1-D systems, Strings, Modal (Fourier) Solution b) Strings II: Waveguide (D’Alembert) Solution c) 1-D systems, Bars, Tubes, solutions d) Advanced Waveguide Synthesis for 1-D systems
    Session 5: Physical Modeling II: 2 And 3-D Systems 
    a) 2-D systems, plates, drums, higher-order modes Fourier (Sine and/or Modal) Solutions, Waveguide Solutions b) 3-D systems, rooms, resonators, Meshes, Waveguides c) Resonator/Modal view and solution of 3-D systems Pop bottles and other lumped resonators
    Session 6: Subtractive Synthesis, Vocal Sounds And Models 
    a)  Subtractive Synthesis, Voice Synthesis, Formants b) Linear Prediction, LPC c) FOFs d) FM Synthesis: Horns, Bells, Voices
    Session 7: Grains, Particles And Statistical Models 
    a) Wavelets b) Granular Synthesis c) Particle Models, Statistical Modal Synthesis d) Wind, Water, Surf, and Other Whooshing Sounds
    Session 8: Extending And Refining Physical Synthesis Models 
    a) Waveshaping Synthesis, Distortion Modeling b) Time-Varying Systems c) Stiffness, All-Pass Filters, Banded Waveguides d) Commuted Synthesis e) JULIUS on KS, strings, demos
    Session 9: Tying It All Together: Applications, Sonification, Interactions, And Control 
    a) Scanned Synthesis b)  Don’t forget the laptop!!! SMELT:   c) Controlling Synthesis with game controllers (Wii, mobile TouchOSC, more) d) Walking Synthesis, a complete system e) Procedural Audio: Driving synthesis from process, game state, etc. f) Data set Sonification
    * This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

    What you need to take this course:

    • Software: ChucK (also optionally STK, PeRColate for Max/MSP, Processing, GL/Glut)

    Recommended (highly) Textbook:

    • Operating system: Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux (Planet CCRMA recommended)
    • Desired: familiarity with algebra. no calculus required.
    • Helpful to have: some personal sound-making things: a guitar or other stringed instrument, a drum, a kitchen pan, a prayer bowl, glasses, bowls, voice...

    COURSE INSTRUCTORS

    Perry Cook

      Perry R. Cook is Emeritus Professor of Computer Science (also Music) at Princeton University, founding advisor/consultant to social music company SMule, and consulting professor at CalArts, Stanford CCRMA. With Dan Trueman, he co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which received a MacArthur Digital Learning Initiative Grant in 2005. With Ge Wang, Cook is co-author of the ChucK Programming Language. His newest book is “Programming for Digital Musicians and Artists,” with Ajay Kapur, Spencer Salazar, and Ge Wang. The recipient of a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cook is (still) working on a new book, "La Bella Voce e La Macchina (the Beautiful Voice and the Machine), A History of Technology and the Expressive Voice." Perry is also co-founder of Kadenze.

      Julius Smith

        Julius O. Smith normally teaches a music signal-processing course sequence and supervises related research at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is formally a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering. In 1975, he received his BS/EE degree from Rice University, where he got started in the field of digital signal processing and modeling for control. In 1983, he received the PhD/EE degree from Stanford University, specializing in techniques for digital filter design and system identification, with application to violin modeling. His work history includes the Signal Processing Department at Electromagnetic Systems Laboratories, Inc., working on systems for digital communications, the Adaptive Systems Department at Systems Control Technology, Inc., working on research problems in adaptive filtering and spectral estimation, and NeXT Computer, Inc., where he was responsible for sound, music, and signal processing software for the NeXT computer workstation. Prof. Smith is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He is the author of four online books and numerous research publications in his field.

        Sound Synthesis

        View All Courses

        Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

        Date: 
        Monday, September 26, 2016 to Monday, December 12, 2016
        Go to Course

        ABOUT THIS COURSE

        This course is an introduction to Logic from a computational perspective. It shows how to encode information in the form of logical sentences; it shows how to reason with information in this form; and it provides an overview of logic technology and its applications - in mathematics, science, engineering, business, law, and so forth.

        The course was originally designed for use at the college level. However, experience has shown that it works for secondary school students as well, and it can be used at the start of graduate school for those who have not yet seen the material.

        PREREQUISITES

        There are just two prerequisites. The course presumes that the student understands sets and set operations, such as union, intersection, and so forth. It also presumes that the student is comfortable with symbolic manipulation, as used, for example, in solving high-school algebra problems. Nothing else is required.

        COURSE STAFF

        Michael Genesereth

        Michael Genesereth is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. He received his Sc.B. in Physics from M.I.T. and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. Prof. Genesereth is most known for his work on computational logic and applications of that work in enterprise computing, computational law, and general game playing. He has taught logic for many years at Stanford and offers an annual massive online course on logic that has reached over 500,000 students. He is the current director of the Logic Group at Stanford and founder and research director of CodeX (The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics).

        FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

        Do I need to buy a textbook?

        No, the text Introduction to Logic is provided in the online material. However, you can purchase a printed version (published by Morgan-Claypool) if you’d like.

        Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment for this class?

        Yes. A Statement of Accomplishment will be given to participants who earn an overall score of 70% or higher in the course.


        View All Courses

        Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

        Go to Course

        Next session opens March 27th.

        About this course:

        In this course you will learn about audio signal processing methodologies that are specific for music and of use in real applications. We focus on the spectral processing techniques of relevance for the description and transformation of sounds, developing the basic theoretical and practical knowledge with which to analyze, synthesize, transform and describe audio signals in the context of music applications.

        The course is based on open software and content. The demonstrations and programming exercises are done using Python under Ubuntu, and the references and materials for the course come from open online repositories. We are also distributing with open licenses the software and materials developed for the course.

        Who is this class for: This course is primary aimed at advanced undergraduate or master students, along with professionals, interested in signal processing, programming and music.

        Created by: Universitat Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona, Stanford University

        Universitat Pompeu Fabra of BarcelonaStanford University

        FAQs

        Can I take this course for free?
        Yes, there is no fee in this course. You can follow the course, do the assignments, and obtain a final grade completely for free.
        Can I pay to get a Course Certificate?
        No, we do not offer this option.
        What resources will I need for this class?
        All the materials and tools for the class are available online under open licences.
        Do I need to buy a textbook for the course?
        No, it is self-contained.
        How much programming background is needed for the course?
        All the assignments start from some existing Python code that the student have to understand and modify. Some programming experience is necessary.
        What is the coolest thing I'll learn if I take this class?
        You will play around with sounds a lot, analysing them, transforming them, and making interesting new sounds.

        Instructors

        Xavier Serra
        Taught by: Xavier Serra, Associate Professor
        Dept. of Information and Communication Technologies, UPF
        Julius Smith
        Taught by: Julius Smith, Professor of Music and (by courtesy) Electrical Engineering
        CCRMA


        View All Courses

        Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

        Pages

        Subscribe to RSS - Engineering & Computer Science