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Engineering and Computer Science
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The Nanotechnology: Design and Manufacturing of Intelligent Systems graduate certificate offers insight into the processes, materials and applications that exploit the unique quantum and surface phenomena exhibited at a nanoscale. You'll explore trends in the engineering of functional systems at the molecular level, as well as outlooks on device fabrication and system integration. Through nano- and micro-electromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS), this technical program will give you advanced and specialized skills in the field of electrical engineering.

You Will Learn

  • Current and future Micro/Nano systems technologies
  • Design, fabrication and testing methods of various Micro/Nano systems, such as electrical, mechanical and fluidic
  • Fundamental principles for design and analysis of microscales sensors, actuators, circuits and fluidics, including scaling laws, new technologies and fabrication processes

Who Should Apply

Engineers and scientists interested in the art of miniaturization technologies, seeking practical design methodologies and fabrication processes.

Earning the Certificate

  • Begin your certificate any academic quarter that an applicable course is offered, subject to prerequisites
  • Take courses for graduate credit and a grade
  • Maintain a B average (GPA of 3.0) or better
  • Complete 3 required courses and 2 elective courses

Application

To pursue a graduate certificate you need to apply.

Tuition

$16,800 - $22,440 (15-17 units)
to complete the certificate

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click Tuition & Fees

Time to Complete Certificate

1-2 years average
3 years maximum to complete

Questions

Submit an inquiry and a representative will contact you.

Sponsors

Olav Solgaard, Professor of Electrical Engineering,
Microphotonics Laboratory


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The Cyber Security graduate certificate provides a professional, technical and policy view of the challenges created by rapid advancements in information technology. You'll examine principles of computer systems security, including attack protection and prevention. By combining computer science and application, this program's interdisciplinary approach will give you the vital skills needed for today's cyber workforce.

You Will Learn

  • Basic theory and practice of cryptographic techniques
  • Digital forensics for identifying potential threats
  • Legal issues in computer security
  • Privacy policy business implications
  • Designs for network perimeter defenses
  • Testing methods for possible system penetrations

Who Should Apply

Information security managers, web developers, computer network architects and professionals working in computer occupations.

Earning the Certificate

  • Begin your certificate any academic quarter that an applicable course is offered, subject to prerequisites
  • Take courses for graduate credit and a grade
  • Receive a B (3.0) or better in each course

Application

To pursue a graduate certificate you need to apply.

Tuition

$13,440 – $18,480 (12-14 units)
to complete the certificate

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click
Tuition & Fees

Time to Complete Certificate

1-2 years average
3 years maximum to complete

Questions

Submit an inquiry and a representative will contact you.


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Date: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 to Sunday, September 13, 2015
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About the Course

Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. This course explains the inner workings of cryptographic primitives and how to correctly use them. Students will learn how to reason about the security of cryptographic constructions and how to apply this knowledge to real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two or more parties generate a shared secret key. We will cover the relevant number theory and discuss public-key encryption and basic key-exchange. Throughout the course students will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field.

The course will include written homeworks and programming labs. The course is self-contained, however it will be helpful to have a basic understanding of discrete probability theory.

A preview of the course, including lectures and homework assignments, is available at this preview site.

FAQ

  • Will I get a statement of accomplishment after completing this class?

    Yes. Students who successfully complete the class will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor.

  • What is the format of the class?

    The class will consist of lecture videos, which are broken into small chunks, usually between eight and twelve minutes each. Some of these may contain integrated quiz questions. There will also be standalone quizzes that are not part of video lectures, and programming assignments. There will be approximately two hours worth of video content per week.

  • How much programming background is needed for the course?

    The course includes programming assignments and some programming background will be helpful. However, we will hand out lots of starter code that will help students complete the assignments. We will also point to online resources that can help students find the necessary background.

  • What math background is needed for the course?

    The course is mostly self contained, however some knowledge of discrete probability will be helpful. The wikibooks article on discrete probability should give sufficient background.

  • Can I see a preview of the lectures and homework?

    Yes, check out this preview site.

Instructor(s): 
Dan Boneh

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Date: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 to Wednesday, November 30, 2016
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About the Course:

Explore how leading audio, music, and video technology companies bring products from idea to market, and discover your career options in the industry. In five 30- to 60-minute sessions, you’ll gain insight into daily life at companies such as Adobe, Universal Audio, iZotope, and more. Learn from professionals who design, engineer, manage, and market leading creative technologies. Examine best practices and responsibilities of various industry roles. Hiring managers will share secrets in navigating the hiring process. And, get your questions answered by our mentor network of creative tech experts and entrepreneurs, who will be online to offer advice in AMA’s and one-on-one office hours.

Continue learning about the creative technology industry in our companion course, Inside the Music and Video Technology Industry.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone considering full-time positions or internships in the media technology industry. No prior engineering background required. Topics include: Introduction to the music and media technology industry, Product Management, Program Management, User Experience, and Software Engineering.

SCHEDULE *

Course runs until November 30, 2016

Session 1: Overview 

This session takes you behind-the-scenes into how the media technology industry really works. We’ll provide a high-level overview of the media technology industry - focusing on the music technology space! We introduce a variety of roles in industry and explore the types of companies available for your future careers.

Session 2: Product Management 

We'll look at how media technology companies develop products that consumers love. How do they determine what new products to develop? Or what the new features are? Who makes those decisions? And how do I get to be that person!

Session 3: Program Management 

Program management is the secret to helping you deliver on time, on budget, in a scalable, repeatable manner! We'll introduce the Agile methodologies used to help companies like Adobe coordinate a product release with over 1,000 team members and millions of lines of code. Students will learn the key traits of a program manager or scrum master.

Session 4: User Experience 

With computing everywhere we go - smart phones, tablets, browser and cloud, desktop, and hardware - product design is everywhere we look. We explore how designers approach the layout, look and feel, and implementation of some of your favorite mobile apps and software. Our mentors provide advice on getting jobs in this competitive space!

Session 5: Software Engineering 

Applications like Pro Tools and iZotope RX are used by professionals all around the world - and they need to be easy to use and almost crash-proof. How do software engineers manage millions of lines of code, written over 10 years, with dozens of engineers continuously modifying, updating, and creating new functionality across Windows, OS X, about 10 plug-in formats? We conclude by offering advice for aspiring software engineers.

* This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

Instructor:

Jay LeBoeuf; Stanford University

Jay LeBoeuf is technology executive, educator, and entrepreneur in the media technology industry. Jay is the President/Executive Director of Real Industry - a nonprofit transforming how students learn about the tech industry and how products go from idea through commercialization. LeBoeuf lectures on music technology and music business at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and is on the Board of Advisors for music startups Chromatik and Humtap. LeBoeuf led research & development, intellectual property, and technology strategy as Strategic Technology Director at iZotope. Jay founded and was CEO of intelligent audio technology company Imagine Research, which was acquired by iZotope in March 2012. While creating a "Google for Sound", Jay was recognized as a Bloomberg Businessweek Innovator, awarded $1.1M in Small Business Innovation Research grants by the U.S. National Science Foundation, and interviewed on BBC World, Science 360, and other major media outlets. Prior to founding Imagine Research, LeBoeuf was an engineer and researcher in the Advanced Technology Group at Digidesign (Avid Technology) in charge of innovations for the industry-standard Pro Tools platform.

careers in media technology

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Course Description

Global warming, air pollution, and energy insecurity are three of the most significant problems facing the world today. Solutions to these problems invariably require a large-scale conversion of our energy infrastructure.

This course will provide you with proven methods and techniques to develop and evaluate strategies for changing the infrastructure at the local, regional and global levels to provide a healthy and sustainable future.

You Will Learn

  • Alternative energy solutions and how to rank them in terms of multiple factors, including carbon-equivalent emissions, air pollution health impacts, land requirements, water requirements, reliability and others
  • Case studies for determining wind as an available and viable sustainable energy source for the world
  • Technical feasibilities of powering the world and individual regions by considering the account costs, transmission needs, jobs, materials and tradeoffs of the solutions you are evaluating

Instructor

Mark Jacobson, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford School of Engineering

Additional Resources

Planning for a Sustainable Future

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Date: 
Monday, June 29, 2015 to Saturday, August 29, 2015
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About the Course

In this course you will learn several fundamental principles of algorithm design. You'll learn the divide-and-conquer design paradigm, with applications to fast sorting, searching, and multiplication. You'll learn several blazingly fast primitives for computing on graphs, such as how to compute connectivity information and shortest paths. Finally, we'll study how allowing the computer to "flip coins" can lead to elegant and practical algorithms and data structures. Learn the answers to questions such as: How do data structures like heaps, hash tables, bloom filters, and balanced search trees actually work, anyway? How come QuickSort runs so fast? What can graph algorithms tell us about the structure of the Web and social networks? Did my 3rd-grade teacher explain only a suboptimal algorithm for multiplying two numbers?

Course Syllabus

Week 1: Introduction.  Asymptotic analysis including big-oh notation.  Divide-and-conquer algorithms for sorting, counting inversions, matrix multiplication, and closest pair.

Week 2: Running time analysis of divide-and-conquer algorithms.  The master method.  Introduction to randomized algorithms, with a probability review.  QuickSort.  

Week 3: More on randomized algorithms and probability.  Computing the median in linear time.  A randomized algorithm for the minimum graph cut problem.

Week 4: Graph primitives.  Depth- and breadth-first search.  Connected components in undirected graphs.  Topological sort in directed acyclic graphs.  Strongly connected components in directed graphs.

Week 5: Dijkstra's shortest-path algorithm.  Introduction to data structures.  Heaps and applications.

Week 6: Further data structures.  Hash tables and applications.  Balanced binary search trees.

Recommended Background

How to program in at least one programming language (like C, Java, or Python); and familiarity with proofs, including proofs by induction and by contradiction.  At Stanford, a version of this course is taken by sophomore, junior, and senior-level computer science majors.  

Suggested Readings

No specific textbook is required for the course.  Much of the course material is covered by the well-known textbooks on algorithms, and the student is encouraged to consult their favorite for additional information.

Course Format

The class will consist of lecture videos, generally between 10 and 15 minutes in length. These usually integrated quiz questions. There will also be standalone homeworks and programming assignments that are not part of video lectures, and a final exam.

FAQ

  • Will I get a statement of accomplishment after completing this class?

    Yes. Students who successfully complete the class will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor.

  • What is the format of the class?

    The class consists of lecture videos, which are broken into small chunks, usually between eight and twelve minutes each. Some of these may contain integrated quiz questions. There will also be standalone quizzes that are not part of video lectures. There will be approximately two hours worth of video content per week.

  • What should I know to take this class? How to program in at least one programming language (like C, Java, or Python); familiarity with proofs, including proofs by induction and by contradiction; and some discrete probability, like how to compute the probability that a poker hand is a full house. At Stanford, a version of this course is taken by sophomore, junior, and senior-level computer science majors.
Instructor(s): 
Tim Roughgarden
Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part I  Course Image

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Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, July 31, 2015
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This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

Course Description

Have you ever wondered how web developers create their websites? In this hands-on course, students will explore the world of programming by learning the fundamental grammar and meaning of the PHP programming language. PHP is a computer scripting language that has been used for many years to produce dynamic web pages. Students will come away with a fundamental understanding of PHP that will be applicable to other programming languages. Topics covered will include language basics (syntax, semantics, data types), variable basics, control flow structures, functions, file handling, and ways to leverage others’ code through the use of libraries. By the end of the course, students will be able to write and build a program, and will be able to figure out how to solve a problem in a programmatic way. 
(Fee applies.)

No prior programming experience is necessary.

Course Staff

Eli Lev, Technology Manager, Stanford Continuing Studies

Eli Lev received an MSEE from Johns Hopkins and has developed software for various government and private sector projects. He has taught continuing education courses at UC San Diego, Foothill College, and Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Ellie Quickly and Marko Gargenta, PHP and MySQL by Example, 1st Edition (ISBN 0131875086)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_CS-41-W#sthas...

Php_Beginning_Programming

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Worldview Stanford
Accepting Applications:
January 1, 2015 - September 21, 2015
Course Starts Online:
September 21, 2015

Fee and Application.

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Course Description

What's driving big data?: We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new value?

Shifting power and influence: As data becomes even more valuable, who will own and control access to it? Will big data create information oligarchs or reduce inequality by giving access to people at the margins? How will brokers of big data influence our purchases, behavior, and beliefs?

Managing the tradeoffs: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Lucy Bernholz,

philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel,

computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Margaret Levi,

political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell,

computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

Jennifer Granick,

attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinski,

psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Big Data Continuing Studies

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Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, August 28, 2015
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This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

Course Description

More and more people are starting to tap into the barely touched opportunities of data. Supporting marketing campaigns with more market data, understanding and preventing product failures with real-time measures, retaining customers with detailed behavior monitoring, or fighting fraud with real-time analysis of hundreds of millions of transactions are among the many examples that demonstrate how pervasive data has become across all lines of business. After years of buzz and mixed results, data technology, management techniques, and processes have gained maturity. Data is now more readily accessible to everyone. In this online course, students will learn how to engage with data and discover concrete and actionable business intelligence techniques to gain immediate control of data and deliver accurate insights, manage change to drive project acceptance, and design lean and sustainable processes. The course will also include detailed case studies and feature expert guest speakers to provide invaluable and fascinating field experience. 

Application and fee apply.

Big Data Continuing Studies

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Worldview Stanford
Coming Soon.
This course is offered through WORLDVIEW Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Fee and Application.

Course Description

This unique course combines hands-on training in the scenario planning methodology with a deep exploration of the environmental, economic and social uncertainties that will shape the future of what we eat, where our food comes from, and whether we will be able to count on its supply and safety in the coming decades.

Online: Get grounded in the latest research and perspectives on the future of the global food system. Learn about some of the biggest challenges—from climate change, population growth, changes in consumption, agricultural practices, and political disputes—as well as the opportunities for boosting resilience through scientific, technological and social advances. 

At Stanford: Develop Scenarios on the Future of Food to 2030. Tap Stanford experts on food to deepen your knowledge. Learn—by doing—the original scenario methodology pioneered by Royal Dutch Shell and Global Business Network, working directly with seasoned practitioners.

  • Identify driving forces and critical uncertainties
  • Develop a scenario framework, stories, and implications
  • Learn scenario planning tips and best practices

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Chris Field,

climate scientist and co-chairman of IPCC Working Group II

Meg Caldwell,

environmental lawyer and Executive Director of the Center for Ocean Solutions

David Lobell,

expert on food and agriculture, Deputy Director, Stanford Center of Food Security and the Environment

Buzz Thompson,

natural resource attorney and co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute

The Future of Food Scenario Training

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