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Engineering & Computer Science

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Engineering and Computer Science
Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, August 28, 2015
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This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

Course Description

More and more people are starting to tap into the barely touched opportunities of data. Supporting marketing campaigns with more market data, understanding and preventing product failures with real-time measures, retaining customers with detailed behavior monitoring, or fighting fraud with real-time analysis of hundreds of millions of transactions are among the many examples that demonstrate how pervasive data has become across all lines of business. After years of buzz and mixed results, data technology, management techniques, and processes have gained maturity. Data is now more readily accessible to everyone. In this online course, students will learn how to engage with data and discover concrete and actionable business intelligence techniques to gain immediate control of data and deliver accurate insights, manage change to drive project acceptance, and design lean and sustainable processes. The course will also include detailed case studies and feature expert guest speakers to provide invaluable and fascinating field experience. 

Application and fee apply.

Big Data Continuing Studies

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Worldview Stanford
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This course is offered through WORLDVIEW Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Fee and Application.

Course Description

This unique course combines hands-on training in the scenario planning methodology with a deep exploration of the environmental, economic and social uncertainties that will shape the future of what we eat, where our food comes from, and whether we will be able to count on its supply and safety in the coming decades.

Online: Get grounded in the latest research and perspectives on the future of the global food system. Learn about some of the biggest challenges—from climate change, population growth, changes in consumption, agricultural practices, and political disputes—as well as the opportunities for boosting resilience through scientific, technological and social advances. 

At Stanford: Develop Scenarios on the Future of Food to 2030. Tap Stanford experts on food to deepen your knowledge. Learn—by doing—the original scenario methodology pioneered by Royal Dutch Shell and Global Business Network, working directly with seasoned practitioners.

  • Identify driving forces and critical uncertainties
  • Develop a scenario framework, stories, and implications
  • Learn scenario planning tips and best practices

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Chris Field

climate scientist and co-chairman of IPCC Working Group II

Meg Caldwell

environmental lawyer and Executive Director of the Center for Ocean Solutions

David Lobell

expert on food and agriculture, Deputy Director, Stanford Center of Food Security and the Environment

Buzz Thompson

natural resource attorney and co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute

 

The Future of Food Scenario Training

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Fee and Application.

This course is offered through the Stanford School of Professional Education as part of the Stanford Advanced Computer Security Certificate.

Applications may be submitted online at anytime. Sample Application

Overview

Cryptographic primitives are effective tools that can help achieve various security goals. However, programs that use cryptography can often be fragile, and simple programming errors can result in large security "holes." Even worse, a company can come away with a false sense of security if their applications use cryptography— due to simple programming errors in how the cryptography is used, their applications could be just as or more vulnerable to attack, but the company may think that it is secure due to the use of cryptography. This course covers how to use cryptography correctly, and teaches programmers how to avoid many common mistakes that result in gaping security holes.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Introduction to Cryptography
  • Using Cryptography Correctly
  • Advanced Topics in Cryptography
  • Symmetric Encryption
  • Public-Key Cryptography
  • User Authentication

Recommended

We recommend you have the equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

We highly recommend that you take this course, Software Security Foundations (XACS101) as the 1st course within the Stanford ACS certificate program. It provides the fundamentals necessary for the subsequent courses in the program.

Tuition

  • $495 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee

Questions

Please contact
650.741.1547
scpd-acs-mail@stanford.edu

 

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Date: 
Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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Fee and Application.

This course is offered through the Stanford School of Professional Education as part of the Stanford Advanced Computer Security Certificate.

Applications may be submitted online at anytime. Sample Application

Overview

This course covers 3 specific topic areas:

Computer Security Principles covers security objectives such as authentication, authorization, access control, confidentiality, data integrity, and non-repudiation. The module also covers software design principles including the principles of least privilege, fail-safe stance, and defense-in-depth.

Introduction to Cryptography covers both symmetric encryption and public-key cryptography, discussing how they are used to achieve security goals and build PKI (Public-Key Infrastructure) systems. The module also covers DES, 3DES, AES, RC4, RSA, ECC, MD5, SHA-1, X.509, digital signatures, and all cryptographic primitives necessary to understand PKI. Diffie-Hellman key exchange and man-in-the-middle attacks will also be discussed.

Secure Programming Techniques discusses the threats that worms and hackers present to software and the programming techniques that developers can use to defend against software vulnerabilities such as buffer overflows, SQL injection, and off-line dictionary attacks. The module also covers common mistakes made in using cryptographic libraries and how they can be avoided.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Computer Security Principles
  • Introduction to Cryptography
  • Secure Programming Techniques

Recommended

We recommend you have the equivalent of a BS in Computer Science and a background in security.

We highly recommend that you take this course, Software Security Foundations (XACS101) as the 1st course within the Stanford ACS certificate program. It provides the fundamentals necessary for the subsequent courses in the program.

Tuition

  • $595 for Software Security Foundations
  • $75 one-time document fee

 

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Date: 
Monday, April 20, 2015 to Sunday, May 31, 2015
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About the Course

Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. This course explains the inner workings of cryptographic primitives and how to correctly use them. Students will learn how to reason about the security of cryptographic constructions and how to apply this knowledge to real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two or more parties generate a shared secret key. We will cover the relevant number theory and discuss public-key encryption and basic key-exchange. Throughout the course students will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field.

The course will include written homeworks and programming labs. The course is self-contained, however it will be helpful to have a basic understanding of discrete probability theory.

A preview of the course, including lectures and homework assignments, is available at this preview site.

FAQ

  • Will I get a statement of accomplishment after completing this class?

    Yes. Students who successfully complete the class will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor.

  • What is the format of the class?

    The class will consist of lecture videos, which are broken into small chunks, usually between eight and twelve minutes each. Some of these may contain integrated quiz questions. There will also be standalone quizzes that are not part of video lectures, and programming assignments. There will be approximately two hours worth of video content per week.

  • How much programming background is needed for the course?

    The course includes programming assignments and some programming background will be helpful. However, we will hand out lots of starter code that will help students complete the assignments. We will also point to online resources that can help students find the necessary background.

  • What math background is needed for the course?

    The course is mostly self contained, however some knowledge of discrete probability will be helpful. The wikibooks article on discrete probability should give sufficient background.

  • Can I see a preview of the lectures and homework?

    Yes, check out this preview site.

 

Instructor(s): 
Dan Boneh
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About This Course

This is a self-paced introductory course on computer networking, specifically the Internet. It focuses on explaining how the Internet works, ranging from how bits are modulated on wires and in wireless to application-level protocols like BitTorrent and HTTP. It also explains the principles of how to design networks and network protocols. Participants gain experience reading and understanding RFCs (Internet protocol specifications) as statements of what a system should do. The course grounds many of the concepts in current practice and recent developments, such as net neutrality and DNS security. A textbook is recommended, but not required: you can use either Peterson and Davie or Kurose and Ross, any version in the past 5 years will do.

Prerequisites

Students need an introductory course in probability, a strong understanding of bits and bytes, and knowledge of how computers lay out data in memory.

Course Staff

Professor Philip Levis

Philip Levis is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his Sc.B. from Brown University in 1999, his M.S. from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2001, and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 2005. In 2008 he received an NSF CAREER award and a Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship. He researches the design and implementation of networked systems, including operating systems and protocols for embedded wireless devices, wireless mesh protocols, network infrastructure for virtual worlds, and energy efficient computing. The results of his research, including the TinyOS operating system, nesC language, Trickle algorithm, and the collection tree protocol (CTP), have been adopted by tens of thousands of users and researchers worldwide. He is a co-founder and the President of Kumu Networks. He really likes excellent engineering and has a self-destructive aversion to low-hanging fruit.

 

Professor Nick McKeown

Nick McKeown has been a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University since 1995. He grew up in the UK and received his BEng from Leeds University in 1986. He moved to the US in 1989 to do an MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at University of California at Berkeley. His research group works on new Internet architectures, software-defined networks and how to make routers faster. He co-founded several companies based on technology started at Stanford. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and recently received the ACM Sigcomm "Lifetime Achievement" Award.

Introduction to Computer Networking

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Date: 
Monday, April 18, 2016
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Accepting Applications 

November 25, 2015 – April 11, 2016 

Course Starts Online: 

April 18, 2016 

Come to Stanford: 

May 31-June 3, 2016 

Fee and Application. 

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates interdisciplinary learning experiences for professionals to prepare them for the strategic challenges ahead. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly? 

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and value? 

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society? 

FEATURED EXPERTS 

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including: 

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society 

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks 

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy 

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society 

Michal Kosinski, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business 

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy 

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

 

Big Data

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Date: 
Monday, February 23, 2015
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This course is offered as part of the Energy Engineering and Technologies Certificate through the Stanford Center for Professional Development.

Overview

This seminar is an interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities. Talks will be conducted by faculty, visitors, and students.

Upcoming guest speakers listing and an archive of past seminars can be found here: http://energyseminar.stanford.edu

Autumn Speakers:
  • Dian Grueneich, Senior Research Scholar, Stanford University
  • Robert Jackson, Professor, Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University
  • Bob Litterman, Chairman of the Risk Committee and a Founding Partner, Kepos Capital LP
  • Michael Sivak, Research Professor, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute
  • Stefan Heck, Consulting Professor, Precourt Institute for Energy
  • Tom Degnan, Manager, Breakthrough Technology, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company

Instructors

Seminars

Individuals who wish to view the seminar at no charge are asked to create a mystanfordconnection account. Once you have created an account, you will be able to access videos via mystanfordconnection. Make sure you have Silverlight 1.0 or Windows Media Player 9+ installed to view videos. Seminars are available two hours after the lecture occurs on campus and on-demand for the remainder of the quarter. All seminars can be found in the "Current Courses" section ofmystanfordconnection.

Tuition & Fees

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click Tuition & Fees.

Certificates and Degrees

 

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Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015
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This course contributes to the Biotechnology Graduate Certificate through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. Application and fee may apply.

Overview

Gain a fundamental understanding of genetic engineering principles and how they can be applied towards new challenges in the biotechnology industry. Optimize chemical transformations within the cell to produce valuable substances such as biofuels, vaccines, and consumer products. Examine the governmental regulations and ethics surrounding hot topic issues such as cloning, stem cells and genome sequencing.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Cell culture
  • Protein production
  • Polymerase chain reactions
  • Viruses and gene therapy
  • Pharmaceutical development
 

Prerequisites

Chemical Principles (Stanford Course:CHEM31) and Calculus (Stanford Course:MATH41) or equivalents

Tuition & Fees

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click Tuition & Fees.

Certificates and Degrees

 

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Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 to Saturday, May 23, 2015
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About the Course

General game players are computer systems able to play strategy games based solely on formal game descriptions supplied at "runtime".  (In other words, they don't know the rules until the game starts.)  Unlike specialized game players, such as Deep Blue, general game players cannot rely on algorithms designed in advance for specific games; they must discover such algorithms themselves.  General game playing expertise depends on intelligence on the part of the game player and not just intelligence of the programmer of the game player.

GGP is an interesting application in its own right.  It is intellectually engaging and more than a little fun.  But it is much more than that.  It provides a theoretical framework for modeling discrete dynamic systems and for defining rationality in a way that takes into account problem representation and complexities like incompleteness of information and resource bounds.  It has practical applications in areas where these features are important, e.g. in business and law.  More fundamentally, it raises questions about the nature of intelligence and serves as a laboratory in which to evaluate competing approaches to artificial intelligence.

This course is an introduction to General Game Playing (GGP).  Students will get an introduction to the theory of General Game Playing and will learn how to create GGP programs capable of competing against other programs and humans.

Recommended Background

Students should be familiar with Symbolic Logic and should be able to read and understand program fragments written in a modern programming language.  This background is sufficient for understanding the presentation and for configuring players to compete in competitions (using software components provided by the instructors).  Students who wish to modify the standard components or who wish to build their own players also need the ability to develop programs on their own.  This latter ability is desirable but not required.
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