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Entrepreneurship

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Course Description: 

Presentations are ubiquitous. From board rooms to chat rooms, we all need to present our ideas and ourselves frequently. Estimates suggest that there are 40 million presentations a day in the United States. Yet many presenters feel uneasy about speaking in front of others. Additionally, speakers can struggle with making their presentations authentic, engaging, and memorable. This online course will provide a hands-on, practical introduction to immediately applicable techniques that will help you prepare and deliver engaging, participative, and impactful in-person and online presentations. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, group activities, and speechmaking, you will learn techniques to confidently deliver presentations, create content that invites engagement, and facilitate speaker/audience interactions that invite collaboration without losing control. Students will develop, deliver, and evaluate a presentation that is meaningful for them. With these presenting skills, you will be able to authentically deliver a compelling presentation tailored to your audience’s needs. 

Matt Abrahams, Lecturer, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Matt Abrahams is an educator and coach who has published research articles on cognitive planning, persuasion, and interpersonal communication. He is the author of Speaking Up Without Freaking Out, and a co-founder and principal at Bold Echo Communication Solutions. He received an MA in communication from UC Davis.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Matthew Abrahams, Speaking up without Freaking Out, 3rd edition (ISBN 978-1465290472)

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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Your customers are mobile. That means you need to be mobile. To do that, you need a plan, and that’s what this course will provide. By looking at a set of interrelated building blocks, from market data to the competitive landscape to organizational and audience insights, this course will prepare you to market effectively in an increasingly mobile-centric world.

Starting with the rising use of smartphones worldwide, we will examine the key trends that are making mobile the fastest-growing marketing channel. The course will also take a step-by-step approach to developing a comprehensive mobile strategy. That includes dedicated sessions on how to gather, synthesize, and apply meaningful data about competitors, your own organization, and your audience. We’ll look at the essential elements of a mobile strategy framework and detail a set of conceptual tools that will help you begin to formulate your approach to mobile marketing. We’ll illustrate some of these concepts with specific examples of successes and failures, dos and don’ts. Along the way, we’ll touch on key partners and resources that are often integral to executing a mobile strategy. These will include platforms (from the established “Big Four”—Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google—to the emerging advertising and data stack), mobile carriers, service providers, and research tools such as comScore and Nielsen. Throughout, the focus will be on guidelines and best practices that will help ensure effective strategy execution. 

Noah Elkin, Research Director, Multichannel Marketing, Gartner

Noah Elkin’s career has revolved around the intersection of technology, strategy, marketing, and content. He is a co-author of Mobile Marketing: An Hour a Day. Before joining Gartner, Elkin served as chief product officer at Industry Index. Prior to that, he was executive editor and chief evangelist at eMarketer, where he wrote dozens of reports and delivered webinars and in-person presentations that helped clients understand the latest digital marketing, media, and commerce trends, and the implications for their business. He received a PhD from Rutgers and a Fulbright Fellowship to Brazil.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Julie Ask, Ted Schadler and Josh Bernoff, The Mobile Mind Shift: Engineer Your Business To Win in the Mobile Moment (ISBN B00KADTR74)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)


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Date: 
Monday, April 17, 2017
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Offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Fee Applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mindset that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings.


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Course Description

A big idea is not enough. You need people to create it and people to buy into it. Your big idea needs a story. Stories fuel innovation. They hold the power to transform listeners; to take listeners on a journey that changes how they think, feel or act. This interactive online course covers the variety of roles a narrative can play, and its potential to transform an organization or new venture. Explore why story is at the heart of effective innovation and how story can be used to transform culture.

Learn How To

Instructor

  • Jennifer Aaker, Professor of Marketing, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University

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About the Course:

Explore how leading audio, music, and video technology companies bring products from idea to market, and discover your career options in the industry. In five 30- to 60-minute sessions, you’ll gain insight into daily life at companies such as Adobe, Universal Audio, iZotope, and more. Learn from professionals who design, engineer, manage, and market leading creative technologies. Examine best practices and responsibilities of various industry roles. Hiring managers will share secrets in navigating the hiring process. And, get your questions answered by our mentor network of creative tech experts and entrepreneurs, who will be online to offer advice in AMA’s and one-on-one office hours.

Continue learning about the creative technology industry in our companion course, Inside the Music and Video Technology Industry.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone considering full-time positions or internships in the media technology industry. No prior engineering background required. Topics include: Introduction to the music and media technology industry, Product Management, Program Management, User Experience, and Software Engineering.

SCHEDULE *

* This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

Session 1: Overview 
This session takes you behind-the-scenes into how the media technology industry really works. We’ll provide a high-level overview of the media technology industry - focusing on the music technology space! We introduce a variety of roles in industry and explore the types of companies available for your future careers.
Session 2: Product Management 
We'll look at how media technology companies develop products that consumers love. How do they determine what new products to develop? Or what the new features are? Who makes those decisions? And how do I get to be that person!
Session 3: Program Management 
Program management is the secret to helping you deliver on time, on budget, in a scalable, repeatable manner! We'll introduce the Agile methodologies used to help companies like Adobe coordinate a product release with over 1,000 team members and millions of lines of code. Students will learn the key traits of a program manager or scrum master.
Session 4: User Experience 
With computing everywhere we go - smart phones, tablets, browser and cloud, desktop, and hardware - product design is everywhere we look. We explore how designers approach the layout, look and feel, and implementation of some of your favorite mobile apps and software. Our mentors provide advice on getting jobs in this competitive space!
Session 5: Software Engineering 
Applications like Pro Tools and iZotope RX are used by professionals all around the world - and they need to be easy to use and almost crash-proof. How do software engineers manage millions of lines of code, written over 10 years, with dozens of engineers continuously modifying, updating, and creating new functionality across Windows, OS X, about 10 plug-in formats? We conclude by offering advice for aspiring software engineers.

Instructor:

Jay LeBoeuf; Stanford University

Jay LeBoeuf is technology executive, educator, and entrepreneur in the media technology industry. Jay is the President/Executive Director of Real Industry - a nonprofit transforming how students learn about the tech industry and how products go from idea through commercialization. LeBoeuf lectures on music technology and music business at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and is on the Board of Advisors for music startups Chromatik and Humtap. LeBoeuf led research & development, intellectual property, and technology strategy as Strategic Technology Director at iZotope. Jay founded and was CEO of intelligent audio technology company Imagine Research, which was acquired by iZotope in March 2012. While creating a "Google for Sound", Jay was recognized as a Bloomberg Businessweek Innovator, awarded $1.1M in Small Business Innovation Research grants by the U.S. National Science Foundation, and interviewed on BBC World, Science 360, and other major media outlets. Prior to founding Imagine Research, LeBoeuf was an engineer and researcher in the Advanced Technology Group at Digidesign (Avid Technology) in charge of innovations for the industry-standard Pro Tools platform.

careers in media technology

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Date: 
Friday, February 24, 2017
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Course Overview

The company that has the most paying customers wins. But how do you get the word out, drive demand for your products and services, and generate sales? Today good marketing involves a clear strategy to reach the target audience, execute appropriate tactics, and measure results. In this course, you will master the fundamentals of outbound and inbound marketing and explore the myriad of options available in today’s world of traditional and social media. Learn how to apply your skills to create a robust and innovative marketing strategy for a new product or a new company.

Learn How To

  • Combine traditional, social and mobile media to drive viral demand
    • Virality does not just happen, though it may look that way. It generally takes months or years of careful planning and experimentation. Learn how to use product design, outbound and inbound marketing to drive viral demand for a business-to-consumer product. Learn how marketing today requires a thorough understanding of the target market and a multitude of traditional, social and innovative marketing programs.
  • Leverage outbound demand generation
    • Outbound marketing is what most people think of when they think of marketing. It is the act of “:buying” a prospects attention or seeking them out. Learn how marketers provide air cover through effective PR and Buzz marketing as well as the basics of driving action that results in people buying something.
  • Tap inbound demand
    • Learn what inbound marketing is all about, how it got started, and what is fundamentally different from the more traditional world of outbound. Explore the new tools marketers now have in hand and are learning how to use every day.
  • Use core demand generation principles and guidelines
    • Create and use a messaging platform for optimal public relations and buzz marketing.

Instructors

Questions

Please contact us at 650.741.1630 or
stanford-innovation@stanford.edu

Tuition

  • $995 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee 
Demand Creation

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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Overview

This introduction to organizational behavior covers diverse topics ranging from employee selection and socialization to group dynamics and organizational culture. Understand the fundamentals propelling individual and collective behavior in organizations through an interactive blend of lectures, reading, discussion, and your own case studies. Focus on what it takes to spark performance in others while at the same time developing their confidence, skills, and abilities.

In spring quarter 2016-17, this course will be using prerecorded lectures and will not be offered on-campus.

Instructors

  • Robert Sutton Professor of Management Science and EngineeringStanford University

Topics Include

  • Organization theory
  • Concepts and functions of management
  • Behavior of the individual, work group, and organization behavior

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Prerequisites

  • 1 year of college level calculus (through calculus of several variables, such as MATH51 or CME100)
  • Background in statistics, experience with spreadsheets recommended.
  • An undergraduate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or equivalent

Organizational Behavior

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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, June 9, 2017
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Registration opens February 27th.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

In these times of rapid change, successful design innovation is distributed, global, and highly collaborative. This course provides you the mindset, solutions, and tools—along with cases and stories drawn from around the world—to build a team that can work across cultures to solve problems. We will focus on the ways that leading design innovators pull together partners, customers, and their own team members across the entire development process, from vision formation through the test and validation of new business opportunities. The course also notably draws on the time-tested methods and rich case history of “ME310: Product-Based Engineering Design, Innovation, and Development,” which has been offered at Stanford for more than fifty years. In ME310, students work across globally distributed teams, using a proven set of principles and tools, to help them move beyond traditional design thinking in order to deliver full-functioning, award-winning products and services.

For part of the course, you will work in small groups to solve problems that major international organizations have posed to the ME310 course in previous years. In the development of solutions, you’ll learn techniques in global teamwork, creativity, and design. Through the combination of short videos, readings, demonstrations, field work, and open forums with faculty, plus personal feedback, you will gain fast practice in understanding design innovation in a globally distributed environment. 

WHAT MAKES OUR ONLINE COURSES UNIQUE: 

  • Course sizes are limited.
    You won't have 5,000 classmates. This course's enrollment is capped at 45 participants.

  • Frequent interaction with the instructor.
    You aren't expected to work through the material alone. Instructors will answer questions and interact with students on the discussion board and through weekly video meetings.
  • Study with a vibrant peer group.
    Stanford Continuing Studies courses attract thoughtful and engaged students who take courses for the love of learning. Students in each course will exchange ideas with one another through easy-to-use message boards as well as optional weekly real-time video conferences.
  • Direct feedback from the instructor.
    Instructors will review and offer feedback on assignment submissions. Students are not required to turn in assignments, but for those who do, their work is graded by the instructor.
  • Courses offer the flexibility to participate on your own schedule.
    Course work is completed on a weekly basis when you have the time. You can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. If you can’t attend the weekly video meetings, the sessions are always recorded for you and your instructor is just an email away.
  • This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.
    To learn more about the program, visit our About Us page. For more information on the online format, please visit the FAQ page.

This is the second in a sequence of three courses on design innovation. In the Fall, students explored designing future solutions within a business context; in the Spring, students will design solutions in the context of global teams; and in the Summer, students will focus on design innovation in the context of personal leadership and growth. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Tamara Carleton, CEO and Founder, Innovation Leadership Board

Tamara Carleton helps organizations to create vision-led, radical innovations. She works closely with the Foresight and Innovation program at Stanford, where she explores how the world’s most innovative companies create technology visions and take action. She received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Larry Leifer, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford

Larry Leifer is the founding director of the Center for Design Research at Stanford. He has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1976, and he has taught the Stanford design innovation course ME310 for over 20 years. He received a PhD in biomedical engineering from Stanford.

William Cockayne, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering–Design, Stanford

William Cockayne has led teams in incubation, research, product development, and manufacturing as an executive and an entrepreneur. He has shipped over twenty successful products at companies large (Eastman Kodak, Daimler, Apple) and small (Scout Electromedia, Handstand, Nota Reader). At Stanford, he teaches the award-winning “ME410: Foresight and Technological Innovation,” a mainstay of innovation teaching and research on campus. He received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Design Your Future

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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, May 26, 2017
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Registration opens February 27th

Fee applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Great companies, like great homes, can be built in many ways. Outstanding entrepreneurs, like outstanding architects, can learn much from the achievements of their predecessors. Designed for the budding entrepreneur, this course will introduce you to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, advisors, and investors, and the varied ways in which they’ve constructed successful startups.

During the course, numerous guest speakers will assist us in addressing these and other key questions: How can you overcome the critical challenges founders face, such as assessing your own unique goals, skills, and capabilities; forming a complementary core team; creating a breakthrough product; and raising initial capital? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of companies, whether big or small, technology- or market-focused, a traditional for-profit startup or a novel social enterprise? Which development path would be best to get your company off to a strong start? Should you go it alone, apply to an incubator or accelerator, or begin pitching venture firms immediately? What are effective ways to raise growth capital from a variety of sources? With rapid growth, what new organizational, managerial, and competitive challenges might your company face? What are useful metrics for measuring a startup’s progress? And, if all goes well, what is the IPO process like? Finally, what vital technological, educational, cultural, and other resources does Silicon Valley offer startups today?

Guest contributors include: Neerav Berry (Co-Founder and CEO, Payplant), Leon Chen (Venture Partner, OrbiMed Advisors), Adam Cheyer (Co-Founder and Vice President of Engineering, Viv Labs), Adam Draper (Managing Director, Boost VC), Timothy Draper (Founder, Draper Associates and DFJ), William H. Draper III (General Partner, Draper Richards LP and Co-Chairman, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation), Jim Fruchterman (Founder and CEO, Benetech), Jim Kleckner (Co-Founder and Vice President, Analytics, CloudPhysics), Kira Makagon (Executive Vice President of Innovation, RingCentral), Ambarish Malpani (Vice President of Engineering, Edmodo), Ted McCluskey (Chief Medical Officer, Finance Technology Leverage), Jessica McKellar (Director of Engineering, Dropbox), Alan Mendelson (Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP), Jan Møller Mikkelsen (President and CEO, Ascendis Pharma A/S), Daria Mochly-Rosen (The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine), Camilla Olson (Founder and CEO, Savitude), Cecily Anne O’Regan (Patent Attorney, Shartsis Friese LLP), George G.C. Parker (Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business), Rob Reis (Founder and CEO, Higher Ground), Elton Sherwin (President and Founder, Sherwin Advisors), and Glenn Winokur (CEO and Co-Founder, Syapse). 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

John Kelley, Co-Founder and COO, OnRisk

John Kelley is the COO of OnRisk, which provides software services to the commercial insurance industry. Earlier, he founded 399 Innovation, which advises firms on invention and innovation strategy. He received a JD from Stanford, where he pursued an independent research track in artificial intelligence and law. Kelley also studied at Sorø Akadamiet in Denmark on an American Field Service Fellowship.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Elton B. Sherwin Jr., The Silicon Valley Way, Second Edition: Discover 45 Secrets for Successful Start-Ups, Second Edition/Paperback (ISBN 0982796110)
(Recommended) William H. Draper III, The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, Paperback (ISBN 0230339948)
(Recommended) Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days, Paperback (ISBN 1430210788)
(Recommended) Ash Maurya, Running Lean: Iterate from Plan A to a Plan That Works, Second Edition/Hardcover (ISBN 1449305172)
(Recommended) William F. Miller et al., The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Paperback(ISBN 0804740631)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Build Successful Startups

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Overview

What are the key ingredients that drive success in entrepreneurial companies? How do entrepreneurs capitalize on new ideas and bring them to market? In this course, you will gain valuable insight into how entrepreneurs start companies and probe the unique mindset that often accompanies a successful venture. Through engaging lectures and hands-on projects, you will discover the best practices of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and venture capitalists and get to test and implement your own startup ideas.

Learn how to:

  • Successfully position and sell your idea
    • Learn the primary reasons and benefits to creating a business plan and the key risks—technology, market, team and financial.
  • Think like a technology entrepreneur
    • Learn about the value of “staged financing” for both entrepreneurs and venture capitalists along with some essential formulas and information regarding venture finance.
  • Transfer technology ideas to market
    • Create and grow high-potential ventures using several strategy and entrepreneurship frameworks, including the concepts of disruptive innovations, business model canvas and lean startups.
  • Use the fundamentals of resource development, including talent and capital
    • Examine critical human resource issues for new ventures and the key actions that a founder or CEO should manage.

Instructors

  • Tom Byers ProfessorManagement Science and Engineering

Resources

Questions

Please contact
650.273.5459
stanford-innovation@stanford.edu

Tuition

  • $995 per course
  • $75 one-time document fee
Cultivating Mindset

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