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Entrepreneurship

Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

Overview

This introduction to organizational behavior covers diverse topics ranging from employee selection and socialization to group dynamics and organizational culture. Understand the fundamentals propelling individual and collective behavior in organizations through an interactive blend of lectures, reading, discussion, and your own case studies. Focus on what it takes to spark performance in others while at the same time developing their confidence, skills, and abilities.

In spring quarter 2016-17, this course will be using prerecorded lectures and will not be offered on-campus.

Instructors

  • Robert Sutton Professor of Management Science and EngineeringStanford University

Topics Include

  • Organization theory
  • Concepts and functions of management
  • Behavior of the individual, work group, and organization behavior

Units

3.0 - 4.0

Prerequisites

  • 1 year of college level calculus (through calculus of several variables, such as MATH51 or CME100)
  • Background in statistics, experience with spreadsheets recommended.
  • An undergraduate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or equivalent

Organizational Behavior

Design Your Future: Design Innovation for Global Teams

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, June 9, 2017

Registration opens February 27th.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

In these times of rapid change, successful design innovation is distributed, global, and highly collaborative. This course provides you the mindset, solutions, and tools—along with cases and stories drawn from around the world—to build a team that can work across cultures to solve problems. We will focus on the ways that leading design innovators pull together partners, customers, and their own team members across the entire development process, from vision formation through the test and validation of new business opportunities. The course also notably draws on the time-tested methods and rich case history of “ME310: Product-Based Engineering Design, Innovation, and Development,” which has been offered at Stanford for more than fifty years. In ME310, students work across globally distributed teams, using a proven set of principles and tools, to help them move beyond traditional design thinking in order to deliver full-functioning, award-winning products and services.

For part of the course, you will work in small groups to solve problems that major international organizations have posed to the ME310 course in previous years. In the development of solutions, you’ll learn techniques in global teamwork, creativity, and design. Through the combination of short videos, readings, demonstrations, field work, and open forums with faculty, plus personal feedback, you will gain fast practice in understanding design innovation in a globally distributed environment. 

WHAT MAKES OUR ONLINE COURSES UNIQUE: 

  • Course sizes are limited.
    You won't have 5,000 classmates. This course's enrollment is capped at 45 participants.

  • Frequent interaction with the instructor.
    You aren't expected to work through the material alone. Instructors will answer questions and interact with students on the discussion board and through weekly video meetings.
  • Study with a vibrant peer group.
    Stanford Continuing Studies courses attract thoughtful and engaged students who take courses for the love of learning. Students in each course will exchange ideas with one another through easy-to-use message boards as well as optional weekly real-time video conferences.
  • Direct feedback from the instructor.
    Instructors will review and offer feedback on assignment submissions. Students are not required to turn in assignments, but for those who do, their work is graded by the instructor.
  • Courses offer the flexibility to participate on your own schedule.
    Course work is completed on a weekly basis when you have the time. You can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. If you can’t attend the weekly video meetings, the sessions are always recorded for you and your instructor is just an email away.
  • This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.
    To learn more about the program, visit our About Us page. For more information on the online format, please visit the FAQ page.

This is the second in a sequence of three courses on design innovation. In the Fall, students explored designing future solutions within a business context; in the Spring, students will design solutions in the context of global teams; and in the Summer, students will focus on design innovation in the context of personal leadership and growth. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Tamara Carleton, CEO and Founder, Innovation Leadership Board

Tamara Carleton helps organizations to create vision-led, radical innovations. She works closely with the Foresight and Innovation program at Stanford, where she explores how the world’s most innovative companies create technology visions and take action. She received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Larry Leifer, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford

Larry Leifer is the founding director of the Center for Design Research at Stanford. He has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1976, and he has taught the Stanford design innovation course ME310 for over 20 years. He received a PhD in biomedical engineering from Stanford.

William Cockayne, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering–Design, Stanford

William Cockayne has led teams in incubation, research, product development, and manufacturing as an executive and an entrepreneur. He has shipped over twenty successful products at companies large (Eastman Kodak, Daimler, Apple) and small (Scout Electromedia, Handstand, Nota Reader). At Stanford, he teaches the award-winning “ME410: Foresight and Technological Innovation,” a mainstay of innovation teaching and research on campus. He received a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Design Your Future

How to Build Successful Startups: Learn Lessons Straight from Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs - Spring-2017

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, May 26, 2017

Registration opens February 27th

Fee applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Great companies, like great homes, can be built in many ways. Outstanding entrepreneurs, like outstanding architects, can learn much from the achievements of their predecessors. Designed for the budding entrepreneur, this course will introduce you to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, advisors, and investors, and the varied ways in which they’ve constructed successful startups.

During the course, numerous guest speakers will assist us in addressing these and other key questions: How can you overcome the critical challenges founders face, such as assessing your own unique goals, skills, and capabilities; forming a complementary core team; creating a breakthrough product; and raising initial capital? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of companies, whether big or small, technology- or market-focused, a traditional for-profit startup or a novel social enterprise? Which development path would be best to get your company off to a strong start? Should you go it alone, apply to an incubator or accelerator, or begin pitching venture firms immediately? What are effective ways to raise growth capital from a variety of sources? With rapid growth, what new organizational, managerial, and competitive challenges might your company face? What are useful metrics for measuring a startup’s progress? And, if all goes well, what is the IPO process like? Finally, what vital technological, educational, cultural, and other resources does Silicon Valley offer startups today?

Guest contributors include: Neerav Berry (Co-Founder and CEO, Payplant), Leon Chen (Venture Partner, OrbiMed Advisors), Adam Cheyer (Co-Founder and Vice President of Engineering, Viv Labs), Adam Draper (Managing Director, Boost VC), Timothy Draper (Founder, Draper Associates and DFJ), William H. Draper III (General Partner, Draper Richards LP and Co-Chairman, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation), Jim Fruchterman (Founder and CEO, Benetech), Jim Kleckner (Co-Founder and Vice President, Analytics, CloudPhysics), Kira Makagon (Executive Vice President of Innovation, RingCentral), Ambarish Malpani (Vice President of Engineering, Edmodo), Ted McCluskey (Chief Medical Officer, Finance Technology Leverage), Jessica McKellar (Director of Engineering, Dropbox), Alan Mendelson (Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP), Jan Møller Mikkelsen (President and CEO, Ascendis Pharma A/S), Daria Mochly-Rosen (The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine), Camilla Olson (Founder and CEO, Savitude), Cecily Anne O’Regan (Patent Attorney, Shartsis Friese LLP), George G.C. Parker (Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business), Rob Reis (Founder and CEO, Higher Ground), Elton Sherwin (President and Founder, Sherwin Advisors), and Glenn Winokur (CEO and Co-Founder, Syapse). 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

John Kelley, Co-Founder and COO, OnRisk

John Kelley is the COO of OnRisk, which provides software services to the commercial insurance industry. Earlier, he founded 399 Innovation, which advises firms on invention and innovation strategy. He received a JD from Stanford, where he pursued an independent research track in artificial intelligence and law. Kelley also studied at Sorø Akadamiet in Denmark on an American Field Service Fellowship.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Elton B. Sherwin Jr., The Silicon Valley Way, Second Edition: Discover 45 Secrets for Successful Start-Ups, Second Edition/Paperback (ISBN 0982796110)
(Recommended) William H. Draper III, The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, Paperback (ISBN 0230339948)
(Recommended) Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days, Paperback (ISBN 1430210788)
(Recommended) Ash Maurya, Running Lean: Iterate from Plan A to a Plan That Works, Second Edition/Hardcover (ISBN 1449305172)
(Recommended) William F. Miller et al., The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Paperback(ISBN 0804740631)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Build Successful Startups

Cultivating an Entrepreneurial Mindset

Overview

What are the key ingredients that drive success in entrepreneurial companies? How do entrepreneurs capitalize on new ideas and bring them to market? In this course, you will gain valuable insight into how entrepreneurs start companies and probe the unique mindset that often accompanies a successful venture. Through engaging lectures and hands-on projects, you will discover the best practices of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and venture capitalists and get to test and implement your own startup ideas.

Learn how to:

  • Successfully position and sell your idea
    • Learn the primary reasons and benefits to creating a business plan and the key risks—technology, market, team and financial.
  • Think like a technology entrepreneur
    • Learn about the value of “staged financing” for both entrepreneurs and venture capitalists along with some essential formulas and information regarding venture finance.
  • Transfer technology ideas to market
    • Create and grow high-potential ventures using several strategy and entrepreneurship frameworks, including the concepts of disruptive innovations, business model canvas and lean startups.
  • Use the fundamentals of resource development, including talent and capital
    • Examine critical human resource issues for new ventures and the key actions that a founder or CEO should manage.

Instructors

  • Tom Byers ProfessorManagement Science and Engineering

Resources

Questions

Please contact
650.273.5459
stanford-innovation@stanford.edu

Tuition

  • $995 per course
  • $75 one-time document fee
Cultivating Mindset

Prototyping: Fast and Frequent Testing of New Ideas

Overview

Too often we think of prototypes as things we use to test an idea. But in d.thinking, we use the verb prototyping: building to think, acting almost before you are ready. In this session, your team will learn powerful tools with which you can bring your ideas to life. Perry and Jeremy will take you step-by-step through exercises that teach you how to implement a process of discovery for your projects. You and your team learn how to create a wide variety of low-resolution prototypes-from role playing activities to storyboards, from a wall of post-its to a gadget made of materials you can find at your desk.

Why prototype?

  • To communicate, start a conversation with users
  • To fail quickly and cheaply
  • To test possibilities
  • To manage the solution-building process by breaking down a large problem into testable chunks

If your team has taken the Ideation workshop, this Prototyping workshop will expand on the techniques you learned and help you test the ideas you generated.

To Participate in this Workshop:

Request info on the "Innovation at Work Workshop."

Fee Applies.

Prototyping

The Science of Willpower and Change

Date: 
Monday, January 23, 2017 to Friday, March 3, 2017

Course Description:

Physical health, emotional well-being, social relationships, and professional success all require the ability to regulate our thoughts, emotions, and actions. Advances in psychology, neuroscience, medicine, and mind-body research are beginning to paint a new picture of what willpower is, why it matters, and how to develop it. Is willpower in the mind or in the body? Is it possible to run out of willpower, and how do you build a bigger reserve? What motivates people to change? Why do we talk ourselves out of things we really want or need to do? How much control over our thoughts and feelings do we really have, and what are the healthiest ways to regulate them? This course will address those questions through lectures, readings, and discussions and will give students the opportunity to apply the ideas of the course toward making an important change or pursuing a major goal in their lives. 

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

Course Instructor

Kelly McGonigal, Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), Stanford

Kelly McGonigal teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. In collaboration with CCARE, she has conducted scientific research on the benefits of compassion training. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford. She is the author of The Upside of Stress and The Willpower Instinct. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

(Recommended) McGonigal, The Willpower Instinct (ISBN 978-1583334386)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Science of Willpower and Change

Technology Entrepreneurship Part 2 (Winter 17')

Date: 
Sunday, January 8, 2017 to Thursday, March 9, 2017
Course topic: 

Technology Entrepreneurship (TE)

TE introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading globally.

This is an online course where participants are learning in teams and practicing entrepreneurship through concrete projects covering each aspects of startup creation.

With more than 220 000 students throughout 12 sessions, TE has grown into a worldwide community of entrepreneurs learning the best entrepreneurship methodologies and developing their ideas. Many of the alumni are continuing to build their startups beyond the class and mentoring teams in new cohorts.    

We now offer 4 regular runs of the class, one each quarter, split in two sessions, TE1, focused on early idea validation, and TE2, oriented toward product market fit.

Technology Entrepreneurship Part 2

This is the second part of TE with a focus on moving forward a tested idea and starting to test marketing channels and doing your first few sales. By the end of this class you will have a refined business model with an understanding of the necessary partnerships, how to reach your customers and what price and sales model to use. You will also begin exploring funding options and build a list of potential investors.

Is it for me?

Whether you have a product/service already, just an idea, or are starting from zero, Technology Entrepreneurship is designed to offer valuable insights on entrepreneurship, help you take the next step, and connect with talented people across the globe with whom you will form a team potentially leading to a real startup.

At its core, TE is a group and project driven course so we are asking participants to be clear on their availability and goals. You will select your level of participation when completing your profile (you can change category throughout the course) and be able to choose one of the following:

  • Observer, I'm just here to check what it is about. Less than a hour per week
  • Learner, I'm here to complete the course with a limited amount of available time. 2hrs to 5hrs per week
  • Entrepreneur, I'm really serious about this and will dedicate a good part of my time to this. > 5hrs

Requirements

Part 2 is focused on bringing forward a startup idea, so you should have at the very least a concept of product or service, or be willing to join people with an already existing idea.

Program content

These are the area that will be covered in TE 2:

  • basics of marketing, how to craft your message and communicate your value proposition
  • basics of sales, understanding pricing and the other elements of selling your product (which will be also used to further validate (or not?/pivot) your idea)
  • partnership and distribution, how to get help building and delivering your product
  • financing, a look at venture capital, seeking investors and building a pitch deck

What i will get out of it?

Beside knowledge through lectures and assignments:

  • Compete with other teams for a chance to pitch in front of the staff and an investor and win a prize!
  • Enrich your entrepreneurship portfolio through concrete projects like building a prototype, that you can use afterward in your startup journey.
  • Grow your network by exchanging with your fellow learners and potentially meet your co-founders.
  • Get advice from seasoned mentors.
  • Participate in activities like Twitter Chat with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and more.
  • Join the "Technology Entrepreneurship Nation", incredibly supportive and rich of hundreds of active participants in our social media spaces and our chat.

Instructors

Professor Chuck Eesley

Chuck Eesley

Assistant Professor, Management Science & Engineering, Stanford University

Yoni Dayan

Entrepreneur, specialized in edtech and immersive technologies (VR/AR)

Spike Morelli

Entrepreneur, specialized in social entrepreneurship and personal development.        

Technology 2

How to Build Successful Startups: Learn Lessons Straight from Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs - Autumn - 2016

Date: 
Monday, October 3, 2016 to Friday, December 2, 2016

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Great companies, like great homes, can be built in many ways. Outstanding entrepreneurs, like outstanding architects, can learn much from the achievements of their predecessors. Designed for the budding entrepreneur, this course will introduce you to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, advisors, and investors, and the varied ways in which they’ve constructed successful startups.

During the course, numerous guest speakers will assist us in addressing these and other key questions: How can you overcome the critical challenges founders face, such as assessing your own unique goals, skills, and capabilities; forming a complementary core team; creating a breakthrough product; and raising initial capital? What are the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of companies, whether big or small, technology- or market-focused, a traditional for-profit startup or a novel social enterprise? Which development path would be best to get your company off to a strong start? Should you go it alone, apply to an incubator or accelerator, or begin pitching venture firms immediately? What are effective ways to raise growth capital from a variety of sources? With rapid growth, what new organizational, managerial, and competitive challenges might your company face? What are useful metrics for measuring a startup’s progress? And, if all goes well, what is the IPO process like? Finally, what vital technological, educational, cultural, and other resources does Silicon Valley offer startups today?

Guest contributors include: Neerav Berry (Co-Founder and CEO, Payplant), Leon Chen (Venture Partner, OrbiMed Advisors), Adam Cheyer (Co-Founder and Vice President of Engineering, Viv Labs), Adam Draper (Managing Director, Boost VC), Timothy Draper (Founder, Draper Associates and DFJ), William H. Draper III (General Partner, Draper Richards LP and Co-Chairman, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation), Jim Fruchterman (Founder and CEO, Benetech), Jim Kleckner (Co-Founder and Vice President, Analytics, CloudPhysics), Kira Makagon (Executive Vice President of Innovation, RingCentral), Ambarish Malpani (Vice President of Engineering, Edmodo), Ted McCluskey (Chief Medical Officer, Finance Technology Leverage), Jessica McKellar (Director of Engineering, Dropbox), Alan Mendelson (Partner, Latham & Watkins, LLP), Jan Møller Mikkelsen (President and CEO, Ascendis Pharma A/S), Daria Mochly-Rosen (The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine), Camilla Olson (Founder and CEO, Savitude), Cecily Anne O’Regan (Patent Attorney, Shartsis Friese LLP), George G.C. Parker (Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business), Rob Reis (Founder and CEO, Higher Ground), Elton Sherwin (President and Founder, Sherwin Advisors), and Glenn Winokur (CEO and Co-Founder, Syapse). 

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

John Kelley, Co-Founder and COO, OnRisk

John Kelley is the COO of OnRisk, which provides software services to the commercial insurance industry. Earlier, he founded 399 Innovation, which advises firms on invention and innovation strategy. He received a JD from Stanford, where he pursued an independent research track in artificial intelligence and law. Kelley also studied at Sorø Akadamiet in Denmark on an American Field Service Fellowship.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Elton B. Sherwin Jr., The Silicon Valley Way, Second Edition: Discover 45 Secrets for Successful Start-Ups, Second Edition/Paperback (ISBN 0982796110)
(Recommended) William H. Draper III, The Startup Game: Inside the Partnership between Venture Capitalists and Entrepreneurs, Paperback (ISBN 0230339948)
(Recommended) Jessica Livingston, Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days, Paperback (ISBN 1430210788)
(Recommended) Ash Maurya, Running Lean: Iterate from Plan A to a Plan That Works, Second Edition/Hardcover (ISBN 1449305172)
(Recommended) William F. Miller et al., The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Paperback(ISBN 0804740631)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Build Successful Startups

Presentations! Present Your Ideas and Turn Them Into Action

Online Team Workshop!

About the Workshop:

Presentations are a necessity in all areas of a business but presentation skills are often overlooked as a core competency. Many of us even fear the process. Nerves and negative feedback can make you uncomfortable which quickly drain your energy, preventing the effective transfer of information to your audience. In this workshop, Perry Klebahn, Jeremy Utley and Scott Doorley take your team or group through an interactive step-by-step process to create presentations that draw the audience in.

Get ready to practice techniques to amplify the "power messages" in presentations and create active audiences.

  • Learn techniques to engage with an audience
  • Understand how to give feedback without being an expert on the topic
  • Explore ways to make the presentation goal clear and achieve the desired outcome

The new and innovative ideas that your team learns here will change your perspective of the presenting process.

Fee applies.

Presentations

Creating Demand: Driving Growth Using Traditional, Social and Viral Marketing

Now Open!

Application and fee apply.

Overview

The company that has the most paying customers wins. But how do you get the word out, drive demand for your products and services, and generate sales? Today good marketing involves a clear strategy to reach the target audience, execute appropriate tactics, and measure results. In this course, you will master the fundamentals of outbound and inbound marketing and explore the myriad of options available in today’s world of traditional and social media. Learn how to apply your skills to create a robust and innovative marketing strategy for a new product or a new company.

Learn How To

  • Combine traditional, social and mobile media to drive viral demand
    • Virality does not just happen, though it may look that way. It generally takes months or years of careful planning and experimentation. Learn how to use product design, outbound and inbound marketing to drive viral demand for a business-to-consumer product. Learn how marketing today requires a thorough understanding of the target market and a multitude of traditional, social and innovative marketing programs.
  • Leverage outbound demand generation
    • Outbound marketing is what most people think of when they think of marketing. It is the act of “:buying” a prospects attention or seeking them out. Learn how marketers provide air cover through effective PR and Buzz marketing as well as the basics of driving action that results in people buying something.
  • Tap inbound demand
    • Learn what inbound marketing is all about, how it got started, and what is fundamentally different from the more traditional world of outbound. Explore the new tools marketers now have in hand and are learning how to use every day.
  • Use core demand generation principles and guidelines
    • Create and use a messaging platform for optimal public relations and buzz marketing.

 

Instructors

Resources

 

Questions

Please contact us at 650.741.1630 or
stanford-innovation@stanford.edu

Course Preview

Watch a brief overview of the Creating Demand course

Tuition

  • $995 per online course
  • $75 one-time document fee 
Creating Demand

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