Skip to content Skip to navigation

Entrepreneurship

Date: 
Sunday, January 17, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

The Course

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: - Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). - Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. - Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. - Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley
Tech Ent

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016
Go to Course
COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Your customers are mobile. That means you need to be mobile. To do that, you need a plan, and that’s what this course will provide. By looking at a set of interrelated building blocks, from market data to the competitive landscape to organizational and audience insights, this course will prepare you to market effectively in an increasingly mobile-centric world. 

Starting with the dramatic adoption of smartphones worldwide, we will examine the key trends that are making mobile the fastest-growing marketing channel. The course will also take a step-by-step approach to developing a comprehensive mobile strategy. That includes dedicated sessions on how to gather, synthesize, and apply meaningful data about competitors, your own organization, and your audience. We’ll look at the essential elements of a mobile strategy framework and detail a set of conceptual tools that will help you begin to formulate your approach to mobile marketing. We’ll illustrate some of these concepts with specific examples of successes and failures, dos and don’ts. In addition, we’ll look at key partners and external resources that are often integral to executing a mobile strategy. This will include platforms (from the established “Big Four”—Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google—to the emerging advertising and data stack) and also mobile carriers, service providers, and research tools such as comScore and Nielsen. Throughout, the focus will be on guidelines and best practices that will help ensure effective strategy execution. 

Noah Elkin, Author; Former Chief Product Officer, Industry Index

Noah Elkin’s career has revolved around the intersection of technology, strategy, marketing, and content. He is a co-author of Mobile Marketing: An Hour a Day. Prior to joining Industry Index, Elkin was executive editor and chief evangelist at eMarketer, where he wrote dozens of reports and delivered webinars and in-person presentations that helped clients understand the latest digital marketing, media, and commerce trends and the implications for their business. He received a PhD from Rutgers and a Fulbright Fellowship to Brazil.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Ted Schadler, Josh Bernoff, and Julie Ask, The Mobile Mind Shift: Engineer Your Business to Win in the Mobile Moment (ISBN 978-0991361007)
(Required) Jeff Hasen, The Art of Mobile Persuasion: How the World's Most Influential Brands are Transforming the Customer Relationship Through Courageous Mobile Marketing (ISBN 978-0986148330)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Marketing Strategies

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016
Go to Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to help you learn how to bring your business idea to life with a compelling business plan. We will begin by discussing the nature of entrepreneurship and its challenges and rewards. Next, we will form teams to create and present an “elevator pitch,” a description that succinctly crystallizes what your business will do and why it is compelling. To create the elevator pitch, we will explore concepts such as competitive intelligence, market segmentation, and the assessment of customer needs. We will then expand the elevator pitches into more complete business plans by adding details on financial models, organizational setup, and marketing and launch plans. The course will culminate with each team presenting its business plan. In addition to lectures and guest speakers, this course will offer an interactive, hands-on experience, with a number of opportunities to present your work and receive feedback from the class.
This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. 

Rashmi Menon, Product and Startup Consultant

Rashmi Menon has launched numerous businesses and products within large corporations, including The Walt Disney Company, Microsoft, and Yahoo, and has served as vice president of product management at Zvents and VideoGenie. She is a co-founder of Green Resource Network. Menon received an MBA from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

How to Start Your Business

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 to Wednesday, December 9, 2015
Go to Course

Overview

In this seminar entrepreneurial leaders share lessons from real-world experiences across entrepreneurial settings. Speakers include entrepreneurs, leaders from global technology companies, venture capitalists, and best-selling authors. Half-hour talks are followed by a half hour of class interaction. Required online discussion for those seeking credit.

Previous Guest Speakers:

  • Tristan Walker, Walker & Company
  • Sal Khan, Khan Academy
  • Morris Chang, Taiwan Semiconductor and John Hennessy, Stanford University
  • Ed Catmull, Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studio
  • Linda Rottenburg, Endeavor Global
  • Geoff Donaker, Yelp
  • Leah Busque, TaskRabbit
  • Heidi Roizen, DFJ

Instructors

  • RDP modified popup Tom Byers Professor, Management Science and Engineering
  • RDP modified popup Thomas Kosnik Consulting Professor, Management Science and Engineering
  • RDP modified popup Tina Seelig Executive Director, Stanford Tech.Ventures Program

Tuition & Fees

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click Tuition & Fees.

Certificates and Degrees


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 to Wednesday, December 9, 2015
Go to Course

Overview

This companion course to MS&E472 - Entrepreneurial Thought Leader Seminar teaches how to look at a business and analyze its key components using speakers at the weekly Thought Leader Seminar. Assess each company's business model and discuss how the founders discovered their opportunity, built their team, and got funded. Topics are relevant for up-and-coming founders of companies and future engineers or scientists participating in a startup.

Topics Include:

  • Venture Financing
  • Business Models
  • Interpersonal dynamics in the startup environment

Instructors

  • RDP modified popup Ravi Belani Lecturer, Management Science and Engineering

Grading

  • Forum participation- 15%
  • Virtual presentation- 20%
  • Micro-project- 15%
  • Weekly assignments- 35%
  • Final assignment/Lessons learned- 15%

Prerequisites

Corequisite: Entrepreneurial Thought Leader Seminar (Stanford Course MS&E472)

  • 1 year of college level calculus (through calculus of several variables)
  • Background in statistics
  • An undergraduate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or equivalent

Tuition & Fees

For course tuition, reduced tuition (SCPD member companies and United States Armed forces), and fees, please click Tuition & Fees.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 to Friday, November 6, 2015
Go to Course

Offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Fee Applies.

What if everything you thought you knew about stress was wrong? And what if changing your mind about stress could make you happier, healthier, and better able to reach your goals? In this online course, taught by health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, students will learn about new research showing that under certain circumstances stress can be good for us, and rather than trying to escape it, embracing stress and capitalizing on its hidden benefits may be the key to improving our well-being.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 to Wednesday, November 30, 2016
Go to Course

About the Course:

Explore how leading audio, music, and video technology companies bring products from idea to market, and discover your career options in the industry. In five 30- to 60-minute sessions, you’ll gain insight into daily life at companies such as Adobe, Universal Audio, iZotope, and more. Learn from professionals who design, engineer, manage, and market leading creative technologies. Examine best practices and responsibilities of various industry roles. Hiring managers will share secrets in navigating the hiring process. And, get your questions answered by our mentor network of creative tech experts and entrepreneurs, who will be online to offer advice in AMA’s and one-on-one office hours.

Continue learning about the creative technology industry in our companion course, Inside the Music and Video Technology Industry.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone considering full-time positions or internships in the media technology industry. No prior engineering background required. Topics include: Introduction to the music and media technology industry, Product Management, Program Management, User Experience, and Software Engineering.

SCHEDULE *

Course runs until November 30, 2016

Session 1: Overview 

This session takes you behind-the-scenes into how the media technology industry really works. We’ll provide a high-level overview of the media technology industry - focusing on the music technology space! We introduce a variety of roles in industry and explore the types of companies available for your future careers.

Session 2: Product Management 

We'll look at how media technology companies develop products that consumers love. How do they determine what new products to develop? Or what the new features are? Who makes those decisions? And how do I get to be that person!

Session 3: Program Management 

Program management is the secret to helping you deliver on time, on budget, in a scalable, repeatable manner! We'll introduce the Agile methodologies used to help companies like Adobe coordinate a product release with over 1,000 team members and millions of lines of code. Students will learn the key traits of a program manager or scrum master.

Session 4: User Experience 

With computing everywhere we go - smart phones, tablets, browser and cloud, desktop, and hardware - product design is everywhere we look. We explore how designers approach the layout, look and feel, and implementation of some of your favorite mobile apps and software. Our mentors provide advice on getting jobs in this competitive space!

Session 5: Software Engineering 

Applications like Pro Tools and iZotope RX are used by professionals all around the world - and they need to be easy to use and almost crash-proof. How do software engineers manage millions of lines of code, written over 10 years, with dozens of engineers continuously modifying, updating, and creating new functionality across Windows, OS X, about 10 plug-in formats? We conclude by offering advice for aspiring software engineers.

* This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

Instructor:

Jay LeBoeuf; Stanford University

Jay LeBoeuf is technology executive, educator, and entrepreneur in the media technology industry. Jay is the President/Executive Director of Real Industry - a nonprofit transforming how students learn about the tech industry and how products go from idea through commercialization. LeBoeuf lectures on music technology and music business at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and is on the Board of Advisors for music startups Chromatik and Humtap. LeBoeuf led research & development, intellectual property, and technology strategy as Strategic Technology Director at iZotope. Jay founded and was CEO of intelligent audio technology company Imagine Research, which was acquired by iZotope in March 2012. While creating a "Google for Sound", Jay was recognized as a Bloomberg Businessweek Innovator, awarded $1.1M in Small Business Innovation Research grants by the U.S. National Science Foundation, and interviewed on BBC World, Science 360, and other major media outlets. Prior to founding Imagine Research, LeBoeuf was an engineer and researcher in the Advanced Technology Group at Digidesign (Avid Technology) in charge of innovations for the industry-standard Pro Tools platform.

careers in media technology

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, July 31, 2015
Go to Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Everyone agrees that most presentations have room for improvement. But how does one move beyond the dreaded slide show of bulleted lists? What skills and techniques are needed to create a vivid and memorable slide deck? And, how can anyone do this when pressed for time? 

This overview will help you break out of using the traditional PowerPoint template and deliver memorable messages to your audience. You will explore three major areas of presentation design and delivery: organizing your information, using graphic design elements with the appropriate technological tools, and connecting with your audience by understanding the performance aspects of presentation. In the first part of this hands-on online course, we will explore these elements in small-group exercises. In the second half, each student will create, deliver, receive, and incorporate feedback on a three-minute presentation. With extensive time for rehearsing and integrating feedback, you will leave with both a process and a repertoire of skills that can be used in any communication setting. - See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

Course Staff

Carolyn Gale, Founder, Elevator Talk

Carolyn Gale has taught researchers and technical experts across four continents how to communicate their work to nonspecialized audiences. Earlier, she co-founded Clear Communication Group and was director of Stanford’s Research Communication Program. She is also a co-founder of PresentationCamp, community-driven conferences that focus on creating compelling presentations. She received an MS in Instructional Technology from Vanderbilt.

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

Presentation_Continuing_Studies

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, April 13, 2015 to Friday, May 15, 2015
Go to Course

The Course

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: - Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). - Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. - Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. - Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, January 5, 2015 to Sunday, February 15, 2015
Go to Course

[[{"fid":"5517","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default"},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"390","width":"640","alt":"Technology Entrepreneurship","class":"panopoly-image-video media-element file-default"}}]]

 The Course

This course introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. You will learn the process technology entrepreneurs use to start companies. It involves taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity, gathering resources such as talent and capital, figuring out how to sell and market the idea, and managing rapid growth. To gain practical experience alongside the theory, students form teams and work on startup projects in those teams. This is the 7th offering of the class. In total nearly 200,000 students from around the world have participated and worked in teams together in this class. The the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: 1. Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). 2. Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. 3. Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. 4. Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

FAQ: 

Workload: 10-20 hours per week.
Technical Requirements: You need a computer that allows you to watch the video lectures, and the ability to upload your assignments which will be reports and powerpoint/video presentations.
Statement of Accomplishment: Subject to satisfactory performance and course completion, you will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor. This statement will not stand in the place of a course taken at Stanford or an accredited institution.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Entrepreneurship