Skip to content Skip to navigation

Entrepreneurship

Date: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 to Wednesday, November 30, 2016
Go to Course

About the Course:

Explore how leading audio, music, and video technology companies bring products from idea to market, and discover your career options in the industry. In five 30- to 60-minute sessions, you’ll gain insight into daily life at companies such as Adobe, Universal Audio, iZotope, and more. Learn from professionals who design, engineer, manage, and market leading creative technologies. Examine best practices and responsibilities of various industry roles. Hiring managers will share secrets in navigating the hiring process. And, get your questions answered by our mentor network of creative tech experts and entrepreneurs, who will be online to offer advice in AMA’s and one-on-one office hours.

Continue learning about the creative technology industry in our companion course, Inside the Music and Video Technology Industry.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone considering full-time positions or internships in the media technology industry. No prior engineering background required. Topics include: Introduction to the music and media technology industry, Product Management, Program Management, User Experience, and Software Engineering.

SCHEDULE *

Course runs until November 30, 2016

Session 1: Overview 

This session takes you behind-the-scenes into how the media technology industry really works. We’ll provide a high-level overview of the media technology industry - focusing on the music technology space! We introduce a variety of roles in industry and explore the types of companies available for your future careers.

Session 2: Product Management 

We'll look at how media technology companies develop products that consumers love. How do they determine what new products to develop? Or what the new features are? Who makes those decisions? And how do I get to be that person!

Session 3: Program Management 

Program management is the secret to helping you deliver on time, on budget, in a scalable, repeatable manner! We'll introduce the Agile methodologies used to help companies like Adobe coordinate a product release with over 1,000 team members and millions of lines of code. Students will learn the key traits of a program manager or scrum master.

Session 4: User Experience 

With computing everywhere we go - smart phones, tablets, browser and cloud, desktop, and hardware - product design is everywhere we look. We explore how designers approach the layout, look and feel, and implementation of some of your favorite mobile apps and software. Our mentors provide advice on getting jobs in this competitive space!

Session 5: Software Engineering 

Applications like Pro Tools and iZotope RX are used by professionals all around the world - and they need to be easy to use and almost crash-proof. How do software engineers manage millions of lines of code, written over 10 years, with dozens of engineers continuously modifying, updating, and creating new functionality across Windows, OS X, about 10 plug-in formats? We conclude by offering advice for aspiring software engineers.

* This course is running in Adaptive Scheduling mode. You can learn more about how Adaptive Scheduling works in this help article

Instructor:

Jay LeBoeuf; Stanford University

Jay LeBoeuf is technology executive, educator, and entrepreneur in the media technology industry. Jay is the President/Executive Director of Real Industry - a nonprofit transforming how students learn about the tech industry and how products go from idea through commercialization. LeBoeuf lectures on music technology and music business at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and is on the Board of Advisors for music startups Chromatik and Humtap. LeBoeuf led research & development, intellectual property, and technology strategy as Strategic Technology Director at iZotope. Jay founded and was CEO of intelligent audio technology company Imagine Research, which was acquired by iZotope in March 2012. While creating a "Google for Sound", Jay was recognized as a Bloomberg Businessweek Innovator, awarded $1.1M in Small Business Innovation Research grants by the U.S. National Science Foundation, and interviewed on BBC World, Science 360, and other major media outlets. Prior to founding Imagine Research, LeBoeuf was an engineer and researcher in the Advanced Technology Group at Digidesign (Avid Technology) in charge of innovations for the industry-standard Pro Tools platform.

careers in media technology

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, July 31, 2015
Go to Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Everyone agrees that most presentations have room for improvement. But how does one move beyond the dreaded slide show of bulleted lists? What skills and techniques are needed to create a vivid and memorable slide deck? And, how can anyone do this when pressed for time? 

This overview will help you break out of using the traditional PowerPoint template and deliver memorable messages to your audience. You will explore three major areas of presentation design and delivery: organizing your information, using graphic design elements with the appropriate technological tools, and connecting with your audience by understanding the performance aspects of presentation. In the first part of this hands-on online course, we will explore these elements in small-group exercises. In the second half, each student will create, deliver, receive, and incorporate feedback on a three-minute presentation. With extensive time for rehearsing and integrating feedback, you will leave with both a process and a repertoire of skills that can be used in any communication setting. - See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

Course Staff

Carolyn Gale, Founder, Elevator Talk

Carolyn Gale has taught researchers and technical experts across four continents how to communicate their work to nonspecialized audiences. Earlier, she co-founded Clear Communication Group and was director of Stanford’s Research Communication Program. She is also a co-founder of PresentationCamp, community-driven conferences that focus on creating compelling presentations. She received an MS in Instructional Technology from Vanderbilt.

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20144_COM-12-W#sth...

Presentation_Continuing_Studies

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, April 13, 2015 to Friday, May 15, 2015
Go to Course

The Course

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: - Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). - Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. - Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. - Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, January 5, 2015 to Sunday, February 15, 2015
Go to Course

[[{"fid":"5517","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default"},"type":"media","attributes":{"height":"390","width":"640","alt":"Technology Entrepreneurship","class":"panopoly-image-video media-element file-default"}}]]

 The Course

This course introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. You will learn the process technology entrepreneurs use to start companies. It involves taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity, gathering resources such as talent and capital, figuring out how to sell and market the idea, and managing rapid growth. To gain practical experience alongside the theory, students form teams and work on startup projects in those teams. This is the 7th offering of the class. In total nearly 200,000 students from around the world have participated and worked in teams together in this class. The the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: 1. Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). 2. Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. 3. Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. 4. Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

FAQ: 

Workload: 10-20 hours per week.
Technical Requirements: You need a computer that allows you to watch the video lectures, and the ability to upload your assignments which will be reports and powerpoint/video presentations.
Statement of Accomplishment: Subject to satisfactory performance and course completion, you will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor. This statement will not stand in the place of a course taken at Stanford or an accredited institution.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 22, 2014 to Friday, October 24, 2014
Go to Course
Course topic: 

The Course

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to: - Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models). - Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital. - Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea. - Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Sunday, May 11, 2014 to Saturday, July 5, 2014
Go to Course
Course topic: 

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to:

- Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models).

- Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital.

- Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea.

- Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, July 14, 2014 to Sunday, August 24, 2014
Go to Course
Course topic: 

[[{"fid":"5517","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default"},"type":"media","link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":"390","width":"640","class":"panopoly-image-video media-element file-default"}}]]

This course introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. You will learn the process technology entrepreneurs use to start companies. It involves taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity, gathering resources such as talent and capital, figuring out how to sell and market the idea, and managing rapid growth. To gain practical experience alongside the theory, students form teams and work on startup projects in those teams. This is the second offering of the class. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time. By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to:

1. Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models).

2. Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital.

3. Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea.

4. Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.

Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, November 18, 2013 to Monday, January 6, 2014
Go to Course

This is the second half of a course that introduces the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, pioneered in Silicon Valley and now spreading across the world. Last time, nearly 40,000 students from around the world participated and worked in teams together. The top teams were matched with Silicon Valley mentors, and the best teams at the end of the class pitched their ideas to investors. Many of the alumni of the last class are continuing to build their startups and will be mentoring teams this time.

By the conclusion of the course, it is our hope that you understand how to:

    • Articulate a process for taking a technology idea and finding a 
      high-potential commercial opportunity (high performing students will be able to discuss the pros and cons of alternative theoretical models).

    • Create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent 
      and capital.

    • Create and verify a business model for how to sell and market an entrepreneurial idea.

    • Generalize this process to an entrepreneurial mindset of turning problems into opportunities that can be used in larger companies and other settings.
Instructor(s): 
Chuck Eesley
Technology Entrepreneurship Part 2

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Entrepreneurship