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Environment & Energy

The International History of Nuclear Weapons

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017

Course Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.

Reservoir Geomechanics (Spring 2017)

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Tuesday, June 13, 2017

About This Course

This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs.

The course considers key practical issues such as prediction of pore pressure, estimation of hydrocarbon column heights and fault seal potential, determination of optimally stable well trajectories, casing set points and mud weights, changes in reservoir performance during depletion, and production-induced faulting and subsidence. The first part of the course establishes the basic principles involved in a way that allows readers from different disciplinary backgrounds to understand the key concepts.

The course is intended for geoscientists and engineers in the petroleum and geothermal industries, and for research scientists interested in stress measurements and their application to problems of faulting and fluid flow in the crust.

Recommended Background:

Introductory Geology and Geophysics
Familiarity with principles of drilling and petroleum production

Course Format:

  • 20, 90 minute lectures (in ~20 minute segments). 2 lectures will be made available each week.
  • Lecture 1 is a course overview to introduce students to the topics covered in the course. Lectures 2-17 follow 12 chapters of Dr. Zoback’s textbook, Reservoir Geomechanics (Cambridge University Press, 2007) with updated examples and applications. Lectures 18 and 19 are on topics related to geomechanical issues affecting shale gas and tight oil recovery. Lecture 20 is on the topic of managing the risk of triggered and induced seismicity.
  • 8 Homework assignments (and associated video modules) are intended to give students hands-on experience with a number of the topics addressed in the course.
  • The course grade will be based solely on homework assignments. There will be no quizzes or exams.
  • Homework assignments will be graded electronically and will consist of multiple choice and numerical entry responses.
  • There will be an online discussion forum where students can discuss the content of the course and ask questions of each other and the instructors.

Course Staff

Dr. Mark D. Zoback

Dr. Mark D. Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production. He is the Director of the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative and co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity. He was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project, in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. He is the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics, published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press. He is the author/co-author of over 300 technical papers and holds five patents. He was the co-founder of GeoMechanics International in 1996, where he was Chairman of the Board until 2008. Dr. Zoback has received a number of awards and honors, including the 2006 Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society and the 2008 Walter H. Bucher Medal of the American Geophysical Union. In 2011, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and in 2012 elected to Honorary Membership in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. He is the 2013 recipient of the Louis Néel Medal, European Geosciences Union and named an Einstein Chair Professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In 2015, he received the Robert R. Berg Outstanding Research Award of the AAPG and in 2016 he received the Outstanding Contribution to the Public Understanding of the Geosciences Award from AGI. He served on the National Academy of Engineering committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection.

Gader Alalli, Graduate Teaching Assistant

Gader is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geophysics at Stanford University. Gader works with Professor Mark Zoback to investigate the relationship between pore size distribution and permeability in unconventional gas shale reservoirs. His research can shed some insight into why certain ultra-low porosity gas shales with varying mineralogical compositions can have significant permeability variations, which can therefore impact recovery factors. Gader has a Master of Science in Geophysics from Stanford, where he worked on enhancing post-stack crosswell seismic profile (XSP) reflection imaging using AVO-Analysis of separated Up/Down wavefields, with Professor Jerry Harris. Gader previously worked for Saudi Aramco as a Geophysicist for 5 years working on special projects for both exploration and development wells in Saudi Arabia. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University, where he majored in Geophysics and minored in Geology.

Jens-Erik Lund Snee, Graduate Teaching Assistant

Jens-Erik Lund Snee is a 3rd year Ph.D. candidate at the Stanford University Department of Geophysics. Jens works with Professor Mark Zoback to study tectonic stress in Texas. His research has implications for enhancing oil and gas production, mitigating human-triggered earthquakes, and understanding the factors that control the stress field. Jens has a Master of Science in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford, where he studied the tectonic history of the Basin and Range Province, western USA, with Professor Elizabeth Miller. Jens previously worked for Statoil as a deepwater Exploration Geologist, and he studied fault zone geology with Professor Virginia Toy at the University of Otago in New Zealand as part of a Fulbright Fellowship. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Whitman College, where he majored in Geology and Politics.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I at least access the course materials, even if I can't take the course?

Yes. All course material is archived and available for download for non-commercial purposes. To do so, register for the course.

Will I receive a Statement of Accomplishment in this course?

Yes. A Statement of Accomplishment will be given to those students who obtain more than 70% of the maximum points on the 8 homework assignments.

When will my Statement of Accomplishment arrive?

The Statement of Accomplishment will arrive a few weeks after successful completion of the course.

Do I need to purchase a textbook for the course?

While it is not required to purchase the Reservoir Geomechanics textbook for this course, it is recommended. Lectures 2-17 follow the 12 chapters of the book. The book provides significant additional detail and explanation of the course concepts. It is available through:
Cambridge University Press:
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/applied-geoscience-petroleum-and-mining-geoscience/reservoir-geomechanics
Amazon and Kindle:
http://www.amazon.com/Reservoir-Geomechanics-Mark-D-Zoback/dp/0521146194

Res Geomechanics Course Image

Behaviorally Informed Design for Energy Conservation

Date: 
Friday, July 1, 2016
Course topic: 

Now Open!

Overview

Changing the behavior and practices of energy users can be just as important as finding new sources of energy. It requires an understanding of community-based social marketing, psychology and behavioral economics for successful public action and support.

This course covers strategies for designing and implementing effective behavior change programs for promoting environmental sustainability using innovation and design decision frameworks.

You Will Learn

  • Consumer energy reduction intervention frameworks
  • Design thinking and behaviorally informed design principles
  • Personal motivations for engaging with energy consumption
  • Research-derived principles for deploying motivational plans
  • Self-monitoring engagement and social competition programs

Instructors

Tuition

  • $249 per online course

Questions

Please contact the Program Manager at
650.273.5459
scpd-energy@stanford.edu

Behavior Informed Design on Energy Conservation

Reservoir Geomechanics

Date: 
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 to Friday, June 10, 2016

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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs.

The course considers key practical issues such as prediction of pore pressure, estimation of hydrocarbon column heights and fault seal potential, determination of optimally stable well trajectories, casing set points and mud weights, changes in reservoir performance during depletion, and production-induced faulting and subsidence. The first part of the course establishes the basic principles involved in a way that allows readers from different disciplinary backgrounds to understand the key concepts.

The course is intended for geoscientists and engineers in the petroleum and geothermal industries, and for research scientists interested in stress measurements and their application to problems of faulting and fluid flow in the crust.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

Introductory Geology and Geophysics
Familiarity with principles of drilling and petroleum production

COURSE FORMAT:

  • 20, 90 minute lectures (in ~20 minute segments). 2 lectures will be made available each week, starting March 29, 2016.
  • Lecture 1 is a course overview to introduce students to the topics covered in the course. Lectures 2-17 follow 12 chapters of Dr. Zoback’s textbook, Reservoir Geomechanics (Cambridge University Press, 2007) with updated examples and applications. Lectures 18 and 19 are on topics related to geomechanical issues affecting shale gas and tight oil recovery. Lecture 20 is on the topic of managing the risk of triggered and induced seismicity.
  • 8 Homework assignments (and associated video modules) are intended to give students hands-on experience with a number of the topics addressed in the course.
  • The course grade will be based solely on homework assignments. There will be no quizzes or exams.
  • Homework assignments will be graded electronically and will consist of multiple choice and numerical entry responses.
  • There will be an online discussion forum where students can discuss the content of the course and ask questions of each other and the instructors.

COURSE STAFF

Dr. Mark D. Zoback

Dr. Mark D. Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production. He was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. He is the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press. He is the author/co-author of over 300 technical papers and holds five patents. He was the co-founder of GeoMechanics International in 1996, where he was Chairman of the Board until 2008. Dr. Zoback currently serves as a Senior Executive Adviser to Baker Hughes. Dr. Zoback has received a number of awards and honors, including the 2006 Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society and the 2008 Walter H. Bucher Medal of the American Geophysical Union. In 2011, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and in 2012 elected to Honorary Membership in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. He is the 2013 recipient of the Louis Néel Medal, European Geosciences Union and named an Einstein Chair Professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He recently served on the National Academy of Engineering committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. He currently serves on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic. Dr. Zoback is currently serving on the National Academy of Sciences Advisory Board on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.

Fatemeh Rassouli, Graduate Teaching Assistant

Fatemeh Rassouli is a 4th year Ph.D. student in the Stress and Crustal Mechanics research group in Stanford's Department of Geophysics. She runs a laboratory based research project studying time-dependent behavior of shale rock samples at reservoir stress and temperature conditions. Fatemeh completed her B.S. in Mining Engineering at University of Tehran, Iran, with honors in 2008. She also holds a master’s degree in Mining Engineering from University of Tehran and a master’s degree in Geophysics from Stanford University. Fatemeh was a visiting scholar at Tokai University and Toyota National College in Japan in 2010 and MIT in 2015. She currently collaborates with the Stanford Rock and Borehole Geophysics consortium.

Noha Farghal, Graduate Teaching Assistant

Noha Farghal is a 5th year PhD candidate in the Geophysics Department at Stanford University. She is a member of the Zoback Stress and Crustal Mechanics Group, working with Prof. Mark Zoback on identifying and characterizing faults and fracture networks in 3D seismic data from tight gas reservoirs. She graduated Summa Cum Laude in Physics from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and holds a Master degree in Physics and a Master degree in Geophysics. Noha's teaching experience include 3D seismic processing (GP224 at Stanford), nuclear physics and solid state physics laboratories as well as scientific thinking courses.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Can I at least access the course materials, even if I can't take the course?

Yes. All course material is archived and available for download for non-commercial purposes. To do so, register for the course.

Will I receive a Statement of Accomplishment in this course?

Yes. A Statement of Accomplishment will be given to those students who obtain more than 70% of the maximum points on the 8 homework assignments.

Do I need to purchase a textbook for the course?

While it is not required to purchase the Reservoir Geomechanics textbook for this course, it is recommended. Lectures 2-17 follow the 12 chapters of the book. The book provides significant additional detail and explanation of the course concepts. It is available through:
Cambridge University Press:
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/applied-geoscience-petroleum-and-mining-geoscience/reservoir-geomechanics
Amazon and Kindle:
http://www.amazon.com/Reservoir-Geomechanics-Mark-D-Zoback/dp/0521146194

Res Geomechanics Course Image

An Introduction to the Natural Capital Approach

Date: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2016
Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

People depend on nature to sustain and fulfill human life, yet the values of nature are typically ignored in decisions. Mapping and modeling ecosystem services can help highlight the diverse benefits provided to people by nature (what and where) and explore how those benefits might change under different management options--thus bringing information about nature’s values into decisions in practical ways. With these approaches, we can improve the state of biodiversity and human well-being by motivating greater and more cost-effective investments in both.

This course introduces the Natural Capital Project’s (NatCap’s) approach to using ecosystem service information to inform decisions. It uses specific examples to illustrate how the approach has worked in each case and highlights key methods and tools used in implementation.

Split into four modules, NC101 first introduces the concepts of natural capital and ecosystem services, the stocks and flows of vital benefits flowing from nature to people. The second module describes InVEST, NatCap’s software tool for mapping, modeling, and valuing ecosystem services. In addition, it provides guidance on project scoping and on matching approaches and tools to a project’s goals, decision context, timeline, capacity, and quality of data available. Modules 3-4 offer an overview of the skills needed to use InVEST models, including recommendations for how to effectively summarize and communicate model outputs to stakeholders and other audiences.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for those interested in how natural capital approaches can inform decisions taken by governments, multi-lateral development institutions, the private and finance sectors, and non-governmental organizations. It can be a resource for individuals interested in simply learning about these concepts or for those interested in using the NatCap’s approaches and tools in research or to influence decisions. This course can also serve as a primer for those individuals planning to attend one of our in-person training workshops in the future.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course. However, we recommend that you download InVEST and GIS software (either QGIS or ArcGIS). GIS is not mandatory if you do not intend to follow the technical examples or complete the optional assessments contained in modules 3 and 4. Please note that at this time, InVEST is built to run in a Windows environment.

COURSE STAFF

Gregg Verutes

Geographer - Lead Instructor

Gregg Verutes leads NatCap's training program which hosts both introductory and technical workshops throughout the world. His current focus is developing innovative techniques that utilize maps, games, and problem-based exercises to teach students, scientists and practitioners about valuing nature. Gregg also serves as a GIS specialist for the marine team working on coastal zone management and spatial planning in Belize, Vietnam and the Americas. He worked previously for National Geographic as a GIS instructor and a visiting scientist with the World Wildlife Fund's Conservation Science Program. Gregg received his M.S. from San Diego State University and his B.S. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University.

Adrian Vogl

Senior Scientist

Adrian Vogl is leading the application of InVEST models for watershed services, and developing decision support models for spatial planning, permitting new infrastructure projects and mitigation, and targeting investments in watershed conservation. Adrian co-led development of the RIOS tool, in partnership with The Nature Conservancy and the Latin American Water Funds Platform. In addition, Adrian is leading efforts to link the InVEST economic valuation approach with outputs from other hydrologic models. Before joining the Natural Capital Project, Adrian worked in central Texas developing land-use planning decision support tools that incorporate freshwater and groundwater ecosystem services, land development, and conservation planning. Adrian received her Ph.D. in Aquatic Resources from Texas State University-San Marcos, and her B.A. from the University of Arizona in Cultural Anthropology.

Henry Borrebach

Project Manager for Outreach & Training

Henry Borrebach is on the Natural Capital Project's training team, overseeing online education and the annual Natural Capital Symposium, as well as coordinating NatCap trainings around the globe. Henry has extensive experience in applied pedagogy and international education, and he is passionate about making the science behind conservation accessible to the public. He is currently working with the team to develop online training courses that make NatCap's approach and tools available to a wider audience. Henry holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from Florida International University. Before joining the project, he co-founded the O, Miami international poetry festival.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to complete all the modules in the course?

While the lessons contained in each of the four modules are intended to stand alone, we strongly encourage all participants to begin by reading through the Course Roadmap. This section explains how the course is organized and provides important background information about the two case study examples included throughout. To launch the Course Roadmap, click the "Start here" button on the top-left panel of the Courseware.

Do you offer a Statement of Accomplishment for completing the course?

The course is structured to provide two levels of accomplishment. Students completing only Modules 1 and 2 will be provided with a Statement of Accomplishment for Intro to Ecosystem Services. Students who complete Modules 1 through 4 (including the 2 assessments) will receive a Statement of Accomplishment in Ecosystem Services and Applications.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

This course is completely free. Links to download all the necessary course materials and tools are provided within each unit.

How long should it take to complete this course?

The course is divided into four modules. It should take approximately one hour to finish each module and about four hours to complete the entire course.

What is the best way to ask questions or provide feedback?

Click on the "Discussion" tab to link to our online user forum. This forum is monitored daily by our software engineers and scientists.

Natural Capital Approach

Economics of Competing Energy Technologies

Course topic: 

Now Open!

Course Description

While the debate over global warming continues, there's increasing recognition around the world to reduce our collective carbon footprint. Yet disagreement remains over the benefits of renewable energies versus traditional sources like coal, natural gas and oil. Business leaders, policy makers and the general public generally seek lower carbon energy sources but struggle to accurately determine their cost effectiveness.

This course will examine the economics of competing power sources from an investor perspective, evaluating alternative technologies that have vastly different developmental and ongoing costs.

You Will Learn

  • Competitive costs of different energy technologies
  • Financial models to determine revenue generated from investments
  • Carbon reduction strategies and their effectiveness
  • New technologies and how public policy sustains them
  • Portfolio approaches to low carbon emissions

Instructor

Stefan Reichelstein, William R. Timken Professor of Accounting, Graduate School of Business, Stanford

Additional Resources

Economics of Competing Energy Technology

Planning for a Sustainable Future with Wind, Water and the Sun

Now Open!

Course Description

Global warming, air pollution, and energy insecurity are three of the most significant problems facing the world today. Solutions to these problems invariably require a large-scale conversion of our energy infrastructure.

This course will provide you with proven methods and techniques to develop and evaluate strategies for changing the infrastructure at the local, regional and global levels to provide a healthy and sustainable future.

You Will Learn

  • Alternative energy solutions and how to rank them in terms of multiple factors, including carbon-equivalent emissions, air pollution health impacts, land requirements, water requirements, reliability and others
  • Case studies for determining wind as an available and viable sustainable energy source for the world
  • Technical feasibilities of powering the world and individual regions by considering the account costs, transmission needs, jobs, materials and tradeoffs of the solutions you are evaluating

Instructor

Mark Jacobson, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford School of Engineering

Additional Resources

Planning for a Sustainable Future

Introduction to the Natural Capital Approach in Department of Defense Environments

Date: 
Monday, May 18, 2015

ABOUT THIS COURSE

People depend on nature to sustain and fulfill human life, yet the values of nature are typically ignored in decisions. Mapping and modeling ecosystem services can help highlight the diverse benefits provided to people by nature (what and where) and explore how those benefits might change under different management options--thus bringing information about nature’s values into decisions in practical ways. With these approaches, we can improve the state of biodiversity and human well-being by motivating greater and more cost-effective investments in both.

This course introduces the Natural Capital Project’s (NatCap’s) approach to using ecosystem service information to inform decisions. It uses specific examples from Department of Defense installations to illustrate how the approach works in these environmnets, highlighting key methods and tools used in implementation.

Split into five modules, NCP102 first gives an overview of the inception of the Natural Capital Project's work with the Department of Defense, and explains why these ideas and approaches can be widely applied in other DoD contexts. Module 2 introduces the concepts of natural capital and ecosystem services, the stocks and flows of vital benefits flowing from nature to people. The thids module describes InVEST, NatCap’s software tool for mapping, modeling, and valuing ecosystem services. In addition, it provides guidance on project scoping and on matching approaches and tools to a project’s goals, decision context, timeline, capacity, and quality of data available. Modules 4-5 offer an overview of the skills needed to use InVEST models, including recommendations for how to effectively summarize and communicate model outputs to stakeholders and other audiences.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for those interested in how natural capital approaches can inform decisions taken by governments, multi-lateral development institutions, and non-governmental organizations, with particular focus on informing Department of Defense land management decisions. It can be a resource for individuals interested in simply learning about these concepts or for those interested in using the NatCap’s approaches and tools in their research or to influence decisions.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course. However, we recommend that you download InVEST and GIS software (either QGIS or ArcGIS). GIS is not mandatory if you do not intend to follow the technical examples or complete the optional assessment contained in modules 4 and 5. InVEST requires a Windows operating system environment to run.

COURSE STAFF

Henry Borrebach

Project Manager for Outreach and Training - Lead Instructor

Henry Borrebach is on the Natural Capital Project's training team, overseeing online education and the annual Natural Capital Symposium, as well as coordinating NatCap trainings around the globe. Henry has extensive experience in applied pedagogy and international education, and he is passionate about making the science behind conservation accessible to the public. He is currently working with the team to develop online training courses that make NatCap's approach and tools available to a wider audience. Henry holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from Florida International University. Before joining the project, he co-founded the O, Miami international poetry festival.

Shan Ma, PhD

Economist

Shan Ma is part of the team that adapted and applied InVEST at three Department of Defense demonstration sites to inform their resource management and land-use policy. In particular, she led the valuation of different ecosystem services of interest at the installations. Her research interests lie in non-market valuation of ecosystem services and its implications for real-world policy. Shan Ma earned her Ph.D. and M.S in agricultural, food and resource economics from Michigan State University, and a bachelor's degree in environmental economics and management from Renmin University of China. Shan Ma was a Mirzayan Science Policy Fellow with the Board on Agricultural and Natural Resources at the National Academies before joining the Natural Capital Project.

Brad Eichelberger

GIS Analyst

Brad Eichelberger is part of a team that adapted and applied InVEST at three Department of Defense demonstration sites to inform their resource management and land-use policy. He altered existing InVEST tools to meet the land manager's goals. He has also worked closely with the hydrology team to develop the freshwater InVEST models. Prior to joining the Natural Capital Project, he was an ecologist with the Natural Heritage Program in Pennsylvania and conducted research on rare species and associated habitat. Brad earned his M.S in applied ecology and conservation biology and a B.S. in biology from Frostburg State University and has received ESRI's Special Achievements in GIS award for his previous work.

Gregg Verutes

Geographer and Science Education Lead

Gregg Verutes leads NatCap's training program which hosts both introductory and technical workshops throughout the world. His current focus is developing innovative techniques that utilize maps, games, and problem-based exercises to teach students, scientists and practitioners about valuing nature. Gregg also serves as a GIS specialist for the marine team working on coastal zone management and spatial planning in Belize, Vietnam and the Americas. He worked previously for National Geographic as a GIS instructor and a visiting scientist with the World Wildlife Fund's Conservation Science Program. Gregg received his M.S. from San Diego State University and his B.S. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to complete all the modules in the course?

While the lessons contained in each of the five modules are intended to stand alone, we strongly encourage all participants to begin by reading through the Course Roadmap. This section explains how the course is organized and provides important background information about the case studies included throughout. To launch the Course Roadmap, click the "Start here" button on the top-left panel of the Courseware.

Do you offer a Statement of Accomplishment for completing the course?

The course is structured to provide two levels of accomplishment. Students completing only Modules 1-3 will be provided with a Statement of Accomplishment for Intro to Ecosystem Services. Students who complete Modules 1 through 5 (including the assessment exercise) will receive a Statement of Accomplishment in Ecosystem Services and Applications.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

This course is completely free. Links to download all the necessary course materials and tools are provided within each unit.

How long should it take to complete this course?

The course is divided into five modules. It should take approximately one hour to finish each module and about five hours to complete the entire course.

What is the best way to ask questions or provide feedback?

Click on the "Discussion" tab to link to our online user forum. This forum is monitored daily by our software engineers and scientists.

Natural Capital Approach

The Future of Food: Scenario Planning Training

Worldview Stanford
Coming Soon.
This course is offered through WORLDVIEW Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Fee and Application.

Course Description

This unique course combines hands-on training in the scenario planning methodology with a deep exploration of the environmental, economic and social uncertainties that will shape the future of what we eat, where our food comes from, and whether we will be able to count on its supply and safety in the coming decades.

Online: Get grounded in the latest research and perspectives on the future of the global food system. Learn about some of the biggest challenges—from climate change, population growth, changes in consumption, agricultural practices, and political disputes—as well as the opportunities for boosting resilience through scientific, technological and social advances. 

At Stanford: Develop Scenarios on the Future of Food to 2030. Tap Stanford experts on food to deepen your knowledge. Learn—by doing—the original scenario methodology pioneered by Royal Dutch Shell and Global Business Network, working directly with seasoned practitioners.

  • Identify driving forces and critical uncertainties
  • Develop a scenario framework, stories, and implications
  • Learn scenario planning tips and best practices

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Chris Field,

climate scientist and co-chairman of IPCC Working Group II

Meg Caldwell,

environmental lawyer and Executive Director of the Center for Ocean Solutions

David Lobell,

expert on food and agriculture, Deputy Director, Stanford Center of Food Security and the Environment

Buzz Thompson,

natural resource attorney and co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute

The Future of Food Scenario Training

Reservoir Geomechanics

Date: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015

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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs.

The course considers key practical issues such as prediction of pore pressure, estimation of hydrocarbon column heights and fault seal potential, determination of optimally stable well trajectories, casing set points and mud weights, changes in reservoir performance during depletion, and production-induced faulting and subsidence. The first part of the course establishes the basic principles involved in a way that allows readers from different disciplinary backgrounds to understand the key concepts.

The course is intended for geoscientists and engineers in the petroleum and geothermal industries, and for research scientists interested in stress measurements and their application to problems of faulting and fluid flow in the crust.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

Introductory Geology and Geophysics
Familiarity with principles of drilling and petroleum production

COURSE FORMAT:

  • 20, 90 minute lectures (in ~20 minute segments). 2 lectures will be made available each week, starting April 1, 2014.
  • Lecture 1 is a course overview to introduce students to the topics covered in the course. Lectures 2-17 follow 12 chapters of Dr. Zoback’s textbook, Reservoir Geomechanics (Cambridge University Press, 2007) with updated examples and applications. Lectures 18 and 19 are on topics related to geomechanical issues affecting shale gas and tight oil recovery. Lecture 20 is on the topic of managing the risk of triggered and induced seismicity.
  • 8 Homework assignments (and associated video modules) are intended to give students hands-on experience with a number of the topics addressed in the course.
  • The course grade will be based solely on homework assignments. There will be no quizzes or exams.
  • Homework assignments will be graded electronically and will consist of multiple choice and numerical entry responses.
  • There will be an online discussion forum where students can discuss the content of the course and ask questions of each other and the instructors.

COURSE STAFF

Dr. Mark D. Zoback

Dr. Mark D. Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production. He was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. He is the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press. He is the author/co-author of over 300 technical papers and holds five patents. He was the co-founder of GeoMechanics International in 1996, where he was Chairman of the Board until 2008. Dr. Zoback currently serves as a Senior Executive Adviser to Baker Hughes. Dr. Zoback has received a number of awards and honors, including the 2006 Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society and the 2008 Walter H. Bucher Medal of the American Geophysical Union. In 2011, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and in 2012 elected to Honorary Membership in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. He is the 2013 recipient of the Louis Néel Medal, European Geosciences Union and named an Einstein Chair Professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He recently served on the National Academy of Engineering committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. He currently serves on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic. Dr. Zoback is currently serving on the National Academy of Sciences Advisory Board on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.

Arjun H. Kohli, Graduate Teaching Assistant

Arjun H. Kohli is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geophysics at Stanford and laboratory manager of the Stress and Crustal Mechanics Laboratory. Arjun conducts research on fault mechanics and microstructure with applications to plate-boundary fault zones, geothermal and petroleum reservoirs, and induced and triggered seismicity. He completed a B.S. in Geology-Physics/Mathematics at Brown University in 2010 and was awarded the Brown University Department of Geological Sciences Undergraduate Research Award for his work on dynamic fault weakening mechanisms. In 2011, he received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to investigate controls on the transition from stable to dynamic fault slip with Dr. Zoback at Stanford. Arjun is currently engaged in collaborative research with numerous partners including the United States Geological Survey, University of Silesia, University of Minnesota, and Stanford University Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Will I receive a Statement of Accomplishment

Yes. A Statement of Accomplishment will be given to students who obtain more than 70% of the maximum score on the homework assignments.

Do I need to purchase a textbook for the course?

While it is not required to purchase the Reservoir Geomechanics textbook for this course, it is recommended. Lectures 2-17 follow the 12 chapters of the book. The book provides significant additional detail and explanation of the course concepts. It is available through:
Cambridge University Press:
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/applied-geoscience-petroleum-and-mining-geoscience/reservoir-geomechanics
Amazon and Kindle:
http://www.amazon.com/Reservoir-Geomechanics-Mark-D-Zoback/dp/0521146194

Res Geomechanics Course Image

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