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Humanities

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Humanities
Date: 
Monday, October 2, 2017 to Monday, November 27, 2017
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About this course

This course teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, peer review, grant writing, ethical issues in scientific publication, and writing for general audiences.

Who is this class for

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students; medical students; scientists; medical professionals; and science writers.

About the Instructor

Kristin Sainani (née Cobb) is an associate professor at Stanford University and also a health and science writer. After receiving an MS in statistics and a PhD in epidemiology from Stanford University, she studied science writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has taught statistics and writing at Stanford for more than a decade and has received several Excellence in Teaching Awards from the graduate program in epidemiology.

Dr. Sainani writes about science and health for a range of audiences. She authored the health column Body News for Allure magazine for a decade. She is also the statistical editor for the journal Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation; and she authors a statistics column, Statistically Speaking, for this journal.

 

 


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Date: 
Monday, September 25, 2017 to Monday, December 11, 2017
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Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course is an introduction to Logic from a computational perspective. It shows how to encode information in the form of logical sentences; it shows how to reason with information in this form; and it provides an overview of logic technology and its applications - in mathematics, science, engineering, business, law, and so forth.

The course was originally designed for use at the college level. However, experience has shown that it works for secondary school students as well, and it can be used at the start of graduate school for those who have not yet seen the material.

PREREQUISITES

There are just two prerequisites. The course presumes that the student understands sets and set operations, such as union, intersection, and so forth. It also presumes that the student is comfortable with symbolic manipulation, as used, for example, in solving high-school algebra problems. Nothing else is required.

COURSE STAFF

Michael Genesereth

Michael Genesereth is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. He received his Sc.B. in Physics from M.I.T. and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. Prof. Genesereth is most known for his work on computational logic and applications of that work in enterprise computing, computational law, and general game playing. He has taught logic for many years at Stanford and offers an annual massive online course on logic that has reached over 500,000 students. He is the current director of the Logic Group at Stanford and founder and research director of CodeX (The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics).

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to buy a textbook?

No, the text Introduction to Logic is provided in the online material. However, you can purchase a printed version (published by Morgan-Claypool) if you’d like.

Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment for this class?

Yes. A Statement of Accomplishment will be given to participants who earn an overall score of 70% or higher in the course.


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Date: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 to Tuesday, March 6, 2018
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Course Overview

“I learned early on that sports is a part of life, that it is human life in microcosm, and that the virtues and flaws of the society exist in sports even as they exist everywhere else.”- Howard Cosell

Athletic competitions are prominent in the modern American university. The evolution of collegiate athletics relies on many factors, including gender perceptions, payment issues, and its intersection with American college life. With this course, you will gain a deeper understanding of the important and complex role athletic tradition plays in American higher education.

You will explore how athletic competition has changed over time and learn about the growth and development of sports in American college life. This course takes a deep dive into attitudes about the value of the athlete and competitive sport in our society, debates about amateur vs. professional, athletic training, issues of class and gender in sports, and the aesthetics of the athletic body.

You will learn:

  • Attitudes surrounding competitive sports in modern day college life
  • Issues of class, race, and gender in sports
  • Economics involved with athletic competition

Prerequisite(s): None
Registration Fee: Free


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Date: 
Monday, September 4, 2017
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About this course:

The objectives of this course are:

-To introduce participants to different concepts of love, to empower them to be conscious of the power of love and the possibility of practicing it in everyday life, and to highlight in particular the idea of love as a force for social justice.

-To communicate a sense of personal strength and empowerment by actively learning from each other and beginning to define how participants can apply their learning in service to society.

This course will explore the concept of agape love (compassion/kindness) as a force for social justice and action and as the inspiration for service and the application of knowledge to positive social change. Biological, psychological, religious, and social perspectives of love will be discussed, drawing on the expertise of people from a variety of disciplines.

During the six-week course, the following topics will be raised and discussed: kinds of love/defining love; non-violent communication; love and the biology of the brain; love as a basic concept of religious and ethical beliefs (e.g., Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Gandhian); love applied in action, and poetic expressions of love as a social force. This curriculum aims to foster a sense of the importance of love as a key phenomenon in creating community, connection, and functional societies among humans.

Course materials will draw from a variety of sources. One of the goals of the class is to provide participants with some knowledge of the literature of love, and readings for the course are listed in the outline of the course on the pages that follow.

Instructor:

Anne Firth Murray


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Date: 
Monday, June 12, 2017
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged participants. We will ask participants to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask participants to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

FAQs

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

COURSE STAFF

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Women's Health and Human Rights

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Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017
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Course topic: 

The Online Writing Program at Stanford Continuing Studies, which offers dynamic courses in every genre, also hosts the Certificate Program in Novel Writing. The Certificate Program builds on the success and excellent teaching of our regular online writing courses with the goal of providing a structured environment in which you can write your novel.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply

Have you always wanted to write a book? The Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing is designed to help you fulfill that dream.

About the Course

We’ve created a seven-course program that will show you the path from first glimmer to full manuscript. You’ll start with the habit of the art, move through a series of targeted workshops, produce a book-length manuscript (or at least a good part of one), and review that manuscript in a one-on-one tutorial with an accomplished fiction writer. Our instructors are all accomplished authors, mostly drawn from Stanford’s prestigious Stegner Fellows.

Because the Certificate Program relies on a dedicated, dynamic cohort, admission is by application only. By studying and writing with a consistent group of students with similar commitment to their work, you’ll achieve a deeper sense of connection and thus a deeper level of learning. You’ll be involved in the creation and construction of many narratives – most notably your own.

Best of all, the Certificate Program retains all the flexibility of our regular online writing courses. You can access your class from home or on your travels, at the times of day that suit your schedule.

By the time you complete your Certificate, you will be well on your way to writing a book-length manuscript. Will it be finished and revised? That’s up to you. But along the way, your work will be read, critiqued, and supported by dedicated instructors who are also serious practitioners in your field.

Ready to apply? Applications are now being accepted for students starting in Fall 2017. The application deadline is Friday, June 2 at 5:00 pm (PDT).


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Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017
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Course Overview

Nuclear weaponry has been a component of military defense since WWII, when the atomic bomb was launched on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  From the development of nuclear fission in 1938 to the present, nuclear weapons have globally created challenges and encouraged systematic reform.  All the while the threat of nuclear war lingers in the midst of international relations.

This course studies the history and politics associated with nuclear weapons and the role of technology transfer in developing nuclear weaponry from a political and military perspective.  It will study the varying ideologies and concepts of these weapons from different states, as well as the efforts to control and eradicate nuclear weapons through international institutions that were designed to reduce the threat of a global nuclear war.

Instructors

Topics Include

  • Nuclear Fission & World War II
  • The Berlin & Cuban Missile Crises
  • The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
  • The US-Soviet Arms Race
  • Nuclear Weapons and International Order

Units

5.0

Prerequisites

No prior background in international relations is necessary to participate in this course.


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Date: 
Monday, January 30, 2017 to Friday, March 17, 2017
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Course Description

This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and, with comparative tastings, form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not.

As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result.

The wines we will taste will compare both Old World (France) and New World (California): Burgundy and California’s Chardonnay and Pinot Noir; Loire varietals such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Muscadet, Pinot Noir, Gamay, and Cabernet Franc; northern and southern Rhône wines with Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, and a dozen others; plus Bordeaux blends from France and California made of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and other Bordeaux varietals.

Pre-requisite

In order to participate in this course, students must be at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million–year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2017 catalogue (available in February 2017). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

To participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes with the instructors and invited winemakers to discuss their experiences with the terroir, grape varieties, winemaking styles, and taste sensations.

Enrollment: Fee Applies.

David G. Howell, Research Geologist (Retired), US Geological Survey

David G. Howell is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America. He has been working with Napa Valley vintners for more than twenty-five years and is the co-author of The Winemaker’s Dance: Exploring Terroir in the Napa Valley. After retiring from the US Geological Survey, Howell was an adjunct professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Science from 2005 to 2009. He received a PhD from UC Santa Barbara and has authored more than 150 scientific articles.

Douglas Posson, Owner, Hexagonvins

Douglas Posson gathers and compiles data and information on wines. He is a co-founder of the US Global Change Research Program, and he led the US Geological Survey’s Arctic data team that received the Presidential Design Achievement Award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Visiting France annually for the past thirty years, he has explored the geography, terroir, food, and especially the wines in Alsace, Burgundy, Beaujolais, the Rhône, Provence, Languedoc, Roussillon, the Loire, the Southwest, and Bordeaux.

Textbooks for this course

(Required) Karen MacNeil, The Wine Bible, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0-7611-8083-8)
(Required) Hugh Johnson & Jancis Robinson, The World Atlas of Wine, 7th Edition (ISBN 978-1-84533-689-9)
(Required) Madeline Puckette & Justin Hammack, Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to Wine, 1st Edition (ISBN 978-1-592-40899-3)
The Geology and Wines of California and France

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Date: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

It’s a special moment in U.S. history in which income inequality has reached unprecedented levels, poverty remains extreme, and racial and gender inequalities are intransigent.
Why is there so much inequality and poverty? How might they be reduced? Find out from the country’s top scholars in “America’s course” on poverty and inequality.

So what makes this course different?

• Comprehensive: Features the 40 key research results that underlie our country’s policy and its new science of poverty and inequality.
• Up-to-date: Highlights the most recent findings and results on poverty and inequality.
• Scholar-direct delivery: The country’s leading scholars present their own research.
• Quick: Each video is short (approximately 5 minutes) and jargon-free.
• Modular: The course is divided into 8 standalone modules.
• Easy to follow: Each module is introduced and explained by David B. Grusky, the director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and Lindsay Owens, Stanford University Ph.D. and Economic Policy Advisor in the office of Senator Elizabeth Warren.
• Excellent readings: Each video is paired with readings that elaborate the videos.
• Accessible: It's free, open to the public, and without any prerequisites.

PREREQUISITES

No prerequisites are required to take the course.

COURSE INSTRUCTORS

David Grusky

David B. Grusky is the Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the Humanities & Sciences and Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, Director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI), Director of the California Welfare Laboratory, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine and the Social Inequality Series. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, co-recipient of the 2004 Max Weber Award, founder of the Cornell University Center for the Study of Inequality, and a former Presidential Young Investigator. His recent books are The Great Recession (with Bruce Western and Chris Wimer, 2011), The New Gilded Age (with Tamar Kricheli-Katz, 2011), The Inequality Puzzle (with Roland Berger, Tobias Raffel, Geoffrey Samuels, and Christopher Wimer, 2010), and The Inequality Reader (with Szonja Szelényi, 2011).

Lindsay Owens

Lindsay Owens is an Economic Policy Advisor in the office of Senator Elizabeth Warren, the 2014-2015 American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow, and teacher of a course on domestic poverty and inequality at Georgetown University. She received her Ph.D. in sociology in 2014 from Stanford University, where she was a National Poverty Fellow at the Center on Poverty and Inequality and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She is a frequent author of opinion pieces and editorials, coeditor of a chartbook of 100 facts and figures on inequality (Inequality in the US: Understanding Inequality with Data), and a contributing author to the 2011 book, The Great Recession. Her research has appeared in some of the leading social science journals, including Social Forces, Public Opinion Quarterly, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

COURSE STAFF

Catherine Sirois

Catherine Sirois is a doctoral student in Sociology at Stanford University, where she studies poverty and incarceration. She managed the Boston Reentry Study at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), directed by Bruce Western, Anthony Braga, and Rhiana Kohl, a longitudinal survey of 122 men and women recently released from Massachusetts state prison. Before joining HKS, Catherine worked on an evaluation of a prison reentry program in New York City and spent a year contributing to social justice initiatives in Uganda and Senegal.

Stephanie Garlow

Stephanie Garlow is the Communications Manager at the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. She leads the Center's publication and dissemination efforts.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to buy a textbook?
The readings are suggested, but not required. Most of the readings come from Inequality in the 21st Century. All proceeds go to the Children's Defense Fund.
Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment?
Yes, it will be possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment.
What's the time investment?
There are no deadlines in the course and you can work through the material at your own pace, but you should expect to spend roughly 2-4 hours per section on the videos and assignments, more if you choose to complete the recommended reading.

COURSE CREDITS

America's Poverty Course was developed by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; videos were produced by Ashley Tindell of Film Archer. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our fundeABOUT THIS COURSE
It’s a special moment in U.S. history in which income inequality has reached unprecedented levels, poverty remains extreme, and racial and gender inequalities are intransigent.
Why is there so much inequality and poverty? How might they be reduced? Find out from the country’s top scholars in “America’s course” on poverty and inequality.
So what makes this course different?

 

Poverty and Inequality MOOC

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Date: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2016
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged students. We will ask students to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

FAQs

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

 

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

 

COURSE STAFF

Course Staff Image #1

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

Course Staff Image #2

Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

International Women's Health and Human Rights

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