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Humanities

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Humanities
Date: 
Monday, March 28, 2016 to Friday, June 3, 2016
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This online writing course is geared toward advanced non-native speakers of English who have significant experience with the language. It will focus on helping participants understand and practice the types of writing needed for most professions, from more formal texts such as proposals and project reports to more informal but still essential communications such as letters and emails. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary choice, sentence structure, and paragraph organization. Coursework will include collaborative vocabulary exercises, sentence-level problem sets, short- and long-passage editing, as well as longer-document homework assignments chosen by the student. Participants will receive instructor and peer feedback throughout the course. 

Instructor

Kenneth Romeo

Lecturer, English for Foreign Students, Stanford Language Center

Kenneth Romeo specializes in listening, vocabulary, and writing courses for foreign students from beginning to advanced levels. He received a PhD in education from Stanford, specializing in language instruction and second-language acquisition.

Textbooks for this course

(Required) Michael Swan, Practical English Usage, 3rd Edition (iOS or Android app is also acceptable) (ISBN 978-0194420983)

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)

Fee applies.

English Continuing Studies Course

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Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016
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Course Description

Virginia Woolf once wrote of Jane Austen that “of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness.” Woolf is right. When we call to mind the most memorable moments in Austen’s novels, we are almost surprised at their triviality: a sprained ankle, an apt retort, a missed appointment. And yet in Austen’s hands they are anything but trivial. Few authors have written more eloquently on the nature of social relations or the subtleties and contradictions of the human heart. Her novels are like microchips—marvels of precise and minute workmanship, and yet at the same time almost infinitely capacious, containing worlds of meaning. 

In this online course, we will explore three of Austen’s major novels: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Northanger Abbey. Our goal will be to appreciate them both as masterpieces of literary style and as windows into Austen’s world. What can Sense and Sensibility teach us about the relationship between modesty and desire in 19th-century England? How do the social classes blend, overlap, and collide in Pride and Prejudice—and just how much is Darcy’s famous £10,000 a year anyway? Who are the authors that Austen is making fun of in her wonderfully satirical Northanger Abbey? What do all these novels have to say about the grand themes of love, grief, community, and friendship? Often our point of entry into these questions will be a minor, seemingly trivial detail. Students are encouraged to read for these “keyholes” and share their insights with the class during discussion. 

Jane Austen

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Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016
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Course Description

This course is designed for curious people who enjoy wine, especially wine from California and France, and would like to learn more about it. We will examine the connection between wines and their terroir—the complete natural environment in which a wine is produced—and learn why “place” and its geologic history—along with the grapes, their viticulture, the climate, and the winemaker’s skills—are all crucial to the characteristics of wines. We will explore the geologic setting of wine regions in California and France and with comparative tastings form the basis for understanding why certain grapes seem to prosper and others do not. As we delve into the geologic history of wine country, we will also learn about the geography, the wines, the names, and the history of numerous wine regions in California and France. By the end of the course, we will have gained a better understanding of why wines are a reflection of “place” and have firsthand knowledge of many of the tastes that result. The wines we will taste will be comparable from both Old World (France) and New World (California) wineries: chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, Bordeaux and Bordeauxstyle blends, and Rhone and Rhone-varietal blends. 

In order to participate in tasting discussions, students will spend approximately $160–$200 on California and French wines. A wine list will be provided at the start of the course. Students will taste the wines in advance of the optional online videoconferencing sessions (which will be recorded and posted). During these sessions, students will compare notes and discuss aspects of terroir, winemaking styles, flavor characteristics, etc. 

Please be aware that some of the optional activities in this course include the consumption of alcohol. Students enrolling in this course must be either: at least 21 years of age (if a resident of the United States), or of legal drinking age for the country in which they reside. 

Please note: Stanford Continuing Studies will offer a separate course excursion to Napa this Spring. The course, led by instructor David Howell, will review the 140 million-year history of the valley, the origin of the mountains and the valley itself, and processes of sedimentation that characterize many of the valley floor vineyards. Participants will examine how elements of topography, climate, and soil, essential elements of terroir, have been used to subdivide Napa into fourteen distinct viticultural areas. The course will focus on Oakville, with vineyard and winery visits along with tastings. Students will also meet with winemakers and vineyard managers. For more information, please see the Spring 2016 catalogue (available in February 2016). While this course excursion builds upon Winter’s “The Geology and Wines of California and France” (GEO 03 W), each can be taken independently as well. 

The Geology and Wines of California and France

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Date: 
Thursday, January 21, 2016
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged students. We will ask students to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

COURSE STAFF

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Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

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Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

 

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

International Women's Health

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Date: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2016
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

American Prophet is a course about the inner life and thoughts of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Many history books tell us that King was a civil rights leader who advocated for peaceful protest and made inspirational speeches. But what was he really thinking and feeling during the various campaigns in which he participated? How did he even become a civil rights leader in the first place? Was he really as confident about his methods as we think?

Over the coming weeks, we will address these questions and many others while exposing participants to one of the most important techniques in historical analysis: the use of primary source documents as windows into the past. There are thousands of documents about King that have been published, with more available online, and each one gives us insight into what his life was really like. In this course, we will focus on a few documents each week in order to both help participants learn the best strategies for understanding primary sources and leverage the information contained within them for our study of King. By the end of the course, participants will feel comfortable using documents as historical sources, appreciate who Dr. King was on a more personal level, and gain new skills in understanding the nuances of historical study.

The first introductory series of American Prophet consists of five episodes that provide an overview of King's private and public life. These episodes, which run every other week from January 12th to March 22nd, will feature the historical materials assembled by Carson and his colleagues for their definitive edition of The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. Enrolled participants completing 70% of assignments for Episodes 1-5 by March 22nd will receive Statements of Accomplishment.

During the Spring, we will release an additional series of episodes that will provide a more comprehensive examination of King's life.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course.

COURSE STAFF

Professor Clayborne Carson

Dr. Clayborne Carson

Clayborne Carson has devoted his professional life to the study of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the movements King inspired. Since receiving his doctorate from UCLA in 1975, Dr. Carson has taught at Stanford University, where he is now Martin Luther King, Jr., Centennial Professor of history and Ronnie Lott Founding Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to buy a textbook?

There are no required textbooks for this class. However, in each episode, we will present a list of optional recommended reading for those interested in delving further into the concepts we introduce.

Is it possible to earn a Statement of Accomplishment for this class?

You do have the opportunity to earn a Statement of Accomplishment for this course. There will be a short multiple choice quiz in each episode, and all you need to do to get the Statement is pass each quiz with at least a 60% score. You may take the quizzes as many times as you wish.

American Prophet

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Date: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 to Friday, December 4, 2015
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This course is offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

This course will survey the history, archaeology, and literature of the ancient Roman world through profiles of important Romans. We will explore the lives of these generals, kings, senators, emperors, and aristocrats to understand the eras in which they lived. Our material will focus both on the famous (such as Julius Caesar, Nero, Hadrian, and Constantine) as well as the more obscure but still interesting Romans (including fraternal revolutionaries Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus, the dictator Sulla, the 3rd-century emperor Gallienus, and the powerful women who safeguarded the patrician Cornelius family).

Through these personages, we will see how Rome grew from a tiny village of mud huts clustered atop hills along the Tiber River into an empire controlling land and people across all of Europe, from Spain to the Near East and from Britain to the shores of the Sahara. Readings will include primary Roman sources (in translation) and biographies written by the subjects’ contemporaries. Excerpts from modern works will also be integrated into our study.


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About this Course

A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything — time, money, experience, skills, and networks — in any amount, to create a better world. This course will empower you to practice philanthropy more effectively and make your giving more meaningful to both you and those you strive to help. Giving 2.0: The MOOC, is a Stanford University-sponsored online course intended to teach givers of all ages, backgrounds, incomes and experiences to give more effectively. Taught by social entrepreneur, philanthropist and bestselling author Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen, Giving 2.0: The MOOC will teach you how to assess nonprofits, create a high-impact philanthropic strategy, volunteer more effectively, use existing, free technology for good and more. Giving 2.0: The MOOC is a six-module course. Each module has a particular theme and 5-10 content-packed and activity-rich, videos exploring that theme. Videos will include lectures from Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen as well as interviews, discussions and lectures given by guest speakers. Guest speakers are renowned leaders in multiple industries including philanthropy, technology and business, who will provide unique insights into course topics. Students will have the opportunity to join Talkabouts – small virtual meeting groups created to discuss class-related topics. By the course’s conclusion, students will have created an Individual Giving Action Plan to guide their future giving in a highly effective and meaningful way. Students will also complete a formal nonprofit assessment and be provided with ongoing, post-MOOC philanthropy education content that will support continued development and execution of their philanthropic goals.

Subtitles available in English
8.5 hours of videos, quizzes, and peer review

Course Staff

Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen


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Date: 
Monday, April 27, 2015 to Friday, June 5, 2015
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Fee Applies.

This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course invites students on a tour of the films of the Coen Brothers, from their first film, Blood Simple, to Fargo and beyond. Each week we will view a Coen film, along with a film classic that influenced it directly or indirectly, so that the Coens’ use of cinema history and Hollywood conventions will be given context and depth. Watching The Big Sleep alongside The Big Lebowski, and Double Indemnity with The Man Who Wasn’t There, students will understand and appreciate how the Coens use and stretch the crime genre and make brilliant fun of film noir, while at the same time paying homage to the great directors Howard Hawks and Billy Wilder. Equally illuminating is a double bill of Preston Sturges’sSullivan’s Travels and the Coens’ Depression-era O Brother, Where Art Thou?, a contemporary take on Sturges’s unusual approach to comedy. How these films “talk to each other” across the decades becomes a way into learning both about Hollywood pictures and genres and about the Coens’ irreverent takes on the classics. Instructor lectures, assigned viewings and readings, and group discussions will connect with the films of the week. Students will keep and share a “viewing notebook” containing their own reflections, observations, and quotations. All films can be purchased or rented on DVD and most can be rented or streamed instantly through Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play Movies, and other online providers.

This is an online course. Thanks to the flexibility of the online format, this course can be taken anywhere, anytime—a plus for students who lead busy lives or for whom regular travel to the Stanford campus is not possible. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions.

J.M. Tyree, Film Critic; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

J.M. Tyree is the co-author of BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski, and the author of BFI Film Classics: Salesman. His newest book, Our Secret Life in the Movies (with Michael McGriff), was named an NPR Best Book of 2014. He is an associate editor at the New England Review.

Textbooks for this course

(Required) William Rodney Allen, The Coen Brothers: Interviews (Conversations with Filmmakers) (ISBN 978-1578068890)
(Required) J. M. Tyree and Ben Walters, BFI Film Classics: The Big Lebowski (ISBN 978-1844571734)

 

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20143_FLM-109-W#sthash.R4i93efy.dpuf


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Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015 to Friday, June 5, 2015
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

More than 6,000 languages are spoken in the world today, and their variety seems unbounded. This linguistic diversity tells us a lot about the development of human language and thought. It also serves as an important tool for understanding the history of human civilization and what it means to be human. In this course, we will examine how languages change and how historical relationships among languages can be ascertained. We will study how languages spoken today reveal the history of populations migrating, splitting, and interacting. We will investigate how languages around the globe differ in their sounds, words, and grammar and will address the question of whether the language one speaks affects how one thinks and perceives the world. We will learn that the variation among languages is not as unrestrained as it may seem to a casual observer, which will lead us to question why human languages evolved to be different yet not limitlessly so. Finally, we will become familiar with cutting-edge scholarship showing that language is not simply a means for communication but rather the essence of what makes us human.

This is an online course. Thanks to the flexibility of the online format, this course can be taken anywhere, anytime—a plus for students who lead busy lives or for whom regular travel to the Stanford campus is not possible. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions.

Tuition Applies.

INSTRUCTOR

Asya Pereltsvaig, Lecturer in Linguistics, Stanford

Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in linguistics from McGill and has taught at Yale, Cornell, and Stanford, as well as at several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages. Her latest book is Languages of the World: An Introduction.

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)- See more at: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/detail/20143_LIN-05-W#sthash.ceWmuYcf.dpuf

Languages of the World

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Date: 
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 to Friday, June 5, 2015
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About This Course

Digging Deeper: The Form and Function of Manuscripts introduces you to the way medieval manuscripts are interpreted, conserved, and disseminated today. The Digging Deeper team of scholars from Stanford and Cambridge shows how to analyze the function of manuscripts, the methods by which they are conserved, and the digital means that are transforming the field of manuscript studies. We will look at the development of music, move beyond the European tradition to study non-Western manuscripts, and see how digital methods are allowing for new inquiry and posing new problems. In pursuing these studies, you will study some of the most significant and beautiful books held by the university libraries of Cambridge and Stanford.

Digging Deeper is a six-week course, with each week featuring filmed sequences of experts with manuscripts, reading assignments, a short transcription, and self-test quizzes. Assignments will help you further your knowledge of how to access manuscripts in person and online, skills in codicology (the study of the medieval book and the physical make-up of manuscripts), palaeography (the describing and analysis of medieval scripts), and transcription (the reading and interpretation of writing in manuscripts). Participants who finish the course will earn a Stanford Statement of Accomplishment.

Digging Deeper: The Form and Function of Manuscripts builds upon the Winter 2015 course Digging Deeper: Making Manscripts, but that class is not a prerequisite to this course.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Course Staff

Professor Elaine Treharne

Elaine Treharne is Roberta Bowman Denning Professor of Humanities at Stanford University. She has published over fifty articles and twenty-six books on Old and Middle English, on Manuscript Studies, and, latterly, on Text Technologies. Her most recent book is Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020 to 1220 (OUP, 2012). She is currently completing the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2015) and The Phenomenal Book, 600 to 1200. Elaine is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, of the Royal Historical Society, and a Trustee of the English Association. She has spent all her career thrilled by the connection between past and present that emerges from the study of old books and their users.

Dr. Benjamin Albritton

Benjamin Albritton is the Digital Manuscripts Program Manager at Stanford University Libraries. He oversees a number of digital manuscript projects, including Parker Library on the Web, Stanford University's digitized medieval manuscripts, and a number of projects devoted to interoperability and improving access to manuscript images for pedagogical and research purposes. His research interests include the intersection of words and music in the fourteenth century, primarily in the monophonic works of Guillaume de Machaut; the uses of digital medieval resources in scholarly communication; and transmission models in the later Middle Ages.

Dr. Suzanne Paul

Suzanne Paul has a PhD in Medieval Studies and is the Medieval Manuscripts Specialist at Cambridge University Library, responsible for looking after a collection of several thousand items ranging from fragments of ancient papyri to illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. While a big part of her role is cataloguing, describing and researching manuscripts, what she enjoys the most is sharing her love of manuscripts with others through digitization projects, teaching and outreach.

Dr. Orietta Da Rold

Orietta Da Rold is a University Lecturer, Fellow at St John’s College, University of Cambridge and a member of the Center for Material Texts. Her research interests are in medieval literature and texts c. 1100-1500, Chaucer, and the digital humanities. In particular, she works on the social and cultural contexts of the circulation and transmission of medieval texts and books, and researches the codicology and palaeography of medieval manuscripts, on which she has published numerous articles and books. She is the editor of several volumes, including A Digital Facsimile of Cambridge, University Library, MS Dd.4.24 of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (HRI Online, 2013), and is currently working on a project on the significance of paper in late medieval books.

Jonathan Quick

Jonathan Quick is a PhD student in the English Department at Stanford University. He studies medieval literature with a particular emphasis on Anglo-Saxon poetry. His other research interests include the history of the book, history of the English language, and the digital humanities. Jonathan leads course research and management on Digging Deeper.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to buy a textbook?

Reading materials will be provided as part of the course, as the weeks progress. If you would like to look at a book before the start of the course, there are a good number of introductory volumes on medieval books and illuminated manuscripts that are widely available through bookshops and online vendors.

 

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