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Humanities

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Humanities
Date: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 to Monday, June 15, 2015
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About This Course

In this course, we will read ten significant premodern poems by women. We have chosen each poem to give you a sense of its structure as a poem and its importance as a form in its time. This course also reveals the roots each poem has in history, in slavery, in conventional thought and unorthodox opinion. Through the introductions to the poems, forum discussions with your fellow participants, and talks by Professor Boland and practicing poets and scholars, we will learn about how poets have fashioned life experience into verse, how to discuss poetry, and what poetry means for each of us today.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Course Staff

Professor Eavan Boland

Eavan Boland is Irish. She has been writer in residence at Trinity College and University College Dublin. She was poet in residence at the National Maternity Hospital during its 1994 Centenary. She has also been the Hurst Professor at Washington University and Regent's Lecturer at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is on the board of the Irish Arts Council and a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. She is on the advisory board of the International Writers Center at Washington University. She has published ten volumes of poetry, the most recent being New Collected Poems (2008) and Domestic Violence (2007) and An Origin Like Water: Collected Poems 1967-87 (1996) with W.W. Norton. She has received the Lannan Award for Poetry and an American Ireland Fund Literary Award. She has published two volumes of prose: Object Lessons: The Life of the Woman and the Poet in Our Time and A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet which won a 2012 PEN Award for creative nonfiction.

Dr. Irena Yamboliev

Irena Yamboliev is Research Assistant for the course. Irena works on the intersection of literary prose style and nonverbal art objects in British literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In particular, she looks at what happens when writers translate the decorative arts as models for their innovative, experimental narrative practices. More broadly, she is interested in color and its history and theory, Decadence, the literature of love, and computational approaches to text analysis. She received her PhD in English from Stanford in January 2015.

Dr. Kenneth Ligda

Kenny Ligda is the Project Manager and Platform Lead on the course. A scholar of twentieth-century literature, Kenny holds a doctorate in English literature, and is the Academic Technology Specialist for the Stanford English Department.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to buy a textbook?

No, all texts will be provided through the course platform.

Who is this class for?

This class is for anyone and everyone intrigued by poetry, the lives of poets, or history. No educational background is required--only an interest in the topic. Particular sections of the course provide a venue for educators to discuss the teaching of poetry.

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Date: 
Monday, January 12, 2015
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ADVENTURES IN WRITING

Welcome to Adventures in Writing, a series of graphic-novel style learning modules designed to help you learn more about and practice a range of effective written communication skills. You’ll immerse yourself in the adventures of Maya and Chris, using each module’s interactive exercises to apply what you’ve learned. Writing instructors in Stanford’s Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) designed the modules to reflect PWR’s philosophy that the best academic and real world communication practices require us to think about more than “correctness” or just getting things right—we must actively consider what we’re trying to achieve with a specific audience for a specific purpose. Through joining Maya and Chris on their adventures, you’ll develop your abilities to communicate in writing—from punctuation and style to argument—increasing the power of your language in the classroom and beyond.

CONCEPTS

While there are many challenges related to writing well for specific external audiences, we’ve chosen to focus on the following issues, crucial to your writing success in a university setting:

1. Introduction to Academic Language

This module works from the premise that effective language users develop conscious awareness of how they use language in making sense of and interacting with the world, and that academic communications have specific expectations about language usage that may differ from other.  Join our characters Maya, Chris, and Josh at a baseball game and learn how to make a successful academic writing pitch.

2. Audience, Purpose, and Context: Language as Communication

This module complicates the personal, individual relationship with language, taking into account the needs and expectations of others.  Join Maya and Chris on their adventure through an amusement park, and learn the importance of “Who,” “Why,” and “What” to effective communication.

3. Passive and Active Constructions

This module focuses on the effect of using passive constructions purposefully and on revising such constructions when appropriate to emphasize agency and action.  Join Maya and Chris as they watch a zombie movie, and learn the importance of understanding when to be passive – and when being passive puts you in danger of being eaten by zombies.

 4. Punctuation: Signposts to Guide Readers

This module explains punctuation as a communication tool that increases the clarity and precision of language.  Join Maya, Chris, and Vlad as they rush to try to get Vlad to his orchestra rehearsal on time, and learn how to use punctuation to help you hit the correct notes in your writing.

5. Argument: Making and Supporting Claims

This module focuses on elements of effective academic argumentation, highlighting a central claim that sets up reader expectations that must be met and supported with appropriate evidence.  Join Maya, Chris, and Fiona in their quest to establish a community garden at their university and learn what it means to get arguments to effectively take root in academic contexts.

Course Authors

  • Christine Alfano, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Christine specializes in teaching courses on digital communication, gaming, and online communities. The co-author of the Envision textbook series, Christine has published on a variety of topics related to visual rhetoric, pedagogy, and online learning. She currently is working on a project funded by Stanford’s Vice Provost for Online Learning, designing video activities for helping students develop effective writing practices.
  • Erik Ellis, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Erik has taught courses on picture books, the rhetoric of words and images, and multimedia essays. His essay “Back to the Future?: The Pedagogical Promise of the (Multimedia) Essay” appears in the collection Multimodal Literacies and Emerging Genres.
  • Wendy Goldberg, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Wendy teaches writing and rhetoric courses focused on musical theater, performance studies, and psychology. She was formerly the Assistant Director of the Stanford Writing Center, and her essay “Center Stage: Performing the Culture of Writing at Stanford” appeared in Creative Approaches to Writing Center Work.
  • Sohui Lee, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Sohui Lee teaches courses on visual design and multimodal communication as well as researches design and multimodal composition pedagogy. She is co-editor with Russell Carpenter of The Routledge Reader on Writing Center and New Media A (2013) and her article “Situated Design for Multiliteracy Centers: A Rhetorical Approach to Visual Design” appeared in SDC: A Journal of Multiliteracy and Innovation (Fall 2014). Currently, she is writing a textbook focusing on introducing composition students to multimodal rhetoric and design called Design for Composition (Parlor Press).
  • Megan O’Connor, Academic Technology Specialist, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Megan develops innovative ways to apply interactive, multimedia technology to the classroom experience, both on campus and online. As an artist and videographer, Megan previously produced the Stuart Collection’s public art video podcast series at UC San Diego, directed the documentary “Finding Home,” and was an artist-in-residence at the Homestead National Monument of America.
  • John Peterson, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. John teaches writing and rhetoric courses focused on arts, culture, and education. He is coordinator of Writing and Rhetoric 1, the first-year composition course at Stanford. His current book project, About Free Speech and Improvisation, investigates how improvisation can be taught in an age of asynchronous electronic education.
  • Carolyn Ross, Lecturer, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Carolyn teaches multimodal composition, including audio and video podcasting, in courses that focus on community-based research and writing, environmental rhetoric, and science communication. She is a photographer, poet, and short story writer and has published two writing textbooks: Writing Nature (1995) and Writing for Real (2002).
  • Zach Waggoner, Associate Director, Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Zach Waggoner has worked as an administrator, a teacher, and a mentor for college-level writing. His research interests focus on video games, rhetoric, and identity; his publications include My Avatar, My Self: Identity in Role-Playing Games (2009) and the edited collection Terms of Play: Essays on Words that Matter in Videogame Theory (2013).

Stanford Student Illustrators

  • Dennis Johnson, Illustrator of Punctuation: Signposts to Guide Readers
  • M.J. Ma, Illustrator of Purpose, Audience, and Context: Language as Communication
  • Serenity Nguyen, Illustrator of Identifying Passive and Active Voice
  • Emma Steinkellner, Illustrator of Academic Language
  • Lilith Wu, Illustrator of Argument: Making and Supporting Claims
  • Holly Hernandez, Colorist
  • Maia Paroginog, Colorist
FAQ: 

What are the prerequisites for this course?

No prerequisites are required to experience these learning modules.  The modules can be taken in any order you like, as many times as you like.

Who is this course for?

Any writer who hopes to improve their writing skills, particularly in relationship to the specific topics covered in these five modules.

How long will this course take?

This course will take 4-6 hours to complete.

What is the course structure?

This course contains five modules, each built around a single writing theme or concept.

What is the pace of the course?

Each module is self-paced.

How will I be assessed?

Each module contains interactive exercises, designed to allow students to test their knowledge of the topic at hand. While these exercises will reveal correct and incorrect answers to help maximize student learning they are not scored.

Does this course carry any kind of Stanford University credit or a Statement of Accomplishment?

No, but students can track their progress through the modules and exercises.

Adventures in Writing

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Date: 
Tuesday, January 20, 2015 to Friday, March 6, 2015
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts introduces you to the study of early text technologies, focusing principally on the medieval book, but covering other textual objects, too, such as scrolls and diplomata. The Digging Deeper team of scholars from Stanford and Cambridge reveals how to investigate manuscripts within repository settings and through online resources, what to look out for when confronted with manuscript images, and how to exploit all the information a manuscript offers. You will learn major characteristics of book production, the terms and methods used by manuscript historians to describe the book, and key themes in early book history. Where were manuscripts made and who made them? What kinds of materials were used and what can those materials tell us? What kinds of texts were created and copied during these centuries? How did multilingualism matter in the medieval period? In pursuing these questions, you will study some of the most significant and beautiful books held by the university libraries of Cambridge and Stanford.

Digging Deeper is a six-week course, with each week featuring filmed sequences of experts with manuscripts, reading assignments, a short transcription, and self-testing quizzes. Assignments will help you develop a basic knowledge of how to access manuscripts in person and online, skills in codicology (the study of the medieval book and the physical make-up of manuscripts), palaeography (the describing and analysis of medieval scripts), and transcription (the reading and interpretation of writing in manuscripts). Participants who finish the course will earn a Stanford Statement of Accomplishment.

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts will be followed in Spring with a course focusing on the interpretation and preservation of manuscripts in the digital era.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course.

COURSE STAFF

Professor Elaine Treharne

Elaine Treharne is Roberta Bowman Denning Professor of Humanities at Stanford University. She has published over fifty articles and twenty-six books on Old and Middle English, on Manuscript Studies, and, latterly, on Text Technologies. Her most recent book is Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020 to 1220(OUP, 2012). She is currently completing the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature(OUP, 2015) and The Phenomenal Book, 600 to 1200. Elaine is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, of the Royal Historical Society, and a Trustee of the English Association. She has spent all her career thrilled by the connection between past and present that emerges from the study of old books and their users.

Dr. Benjamin Albritton

Benjamin Albritton is the Digital Manuscripts Program Manager at Stanford University Libraries. He oversees a number of digital manuscript projects, includingParker Library on the Web, Stanford University's digitized medieval manuscripts, and a number of projects devoted to interoperability and improving access to manuscript images for pedagogical and research purposes. His research interests include the intersection of words and music in the fourteenth century, primarily in the monophonic works of Guillaume de Machaut; the uses of digital medieval resources in scholarly communication; and transmission models in the later Middle Ages.

Dr. Suzanne Paul

Suzanne Paul has a PhD in Medieval Studies and is the Medieval Manuscripts Specialist at Cambridge University Library, responsible for looking after a collection of several thousand items ranging from fragments of ancient papyri to illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. While a big part of her role is cataloguing, describing and researching manuscripts, what she enjoys the most is sharing her love of manuscripts with others through digitization projects, teaching and outreach.

Dr. Orietta Da Rold

Orietta Da Rold is a University Lecturer, Fellow at St John’s College, University of Cambridge and a member of the Center for Material Texts. Her research interests are in medieval literature and texts c. 1100-1500, Chaucer, and the digital humanities. In particular, she works on the social and cultural contexts of the circulation and transmission of medieval texts and books, and researches the codicology and palaeography of medieval manuscripts, on which she has published numerous articles and books. She is the editor of several volumes, including A Digital Facsimile of Cambridge, University Library, MS Dd.4.24 of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (HRI Online, 2013), and is currently working on a project on the significance of paper in late medieval books.

Jonathan Quick

Jonathan Quick is a PhD student in the English Department at Stanford University. He studies medieval literature with a particular emphasis on Anglo-Saxon poetry. His other research interests include the history of the book, history of the English language, and the digital humanities. Jonathan leads course research and management on Digging Deeper.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do I need to buy a textbook?

Reading materials will be provided as part of the course, as the weeks progress. If you would like to look at a book before the start of the course, there are a good number of introductory volumes on medieval books and illuminated manuscripts that are widely available through bookshops and online vendors.

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Date: 
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
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About This Course

People depend on nature to sustain and fulfill human life, yet the values of nature are typically ignored in decisions. Mapping and modeling ecosystem services can help highlight the diverse benefits provided to people by nature (what and where) and explore how those benefits might change under different management options--thus bringing information about nature’s values into decisions in practical ways. With these approaches, we can improve the state of biodiversity and human well-being by motivating greater and more cost-effective investments in both.

This course introduces the Natural Capital Project’s (NatCap’s) approach to using ecosystem service information to inform decisions. It uses specific examples to illustrate how the approach has worked in each case and highlights key methods and tools used in implementation.

Split into four modules, NC101 first introduces the concepts of natural capital and ecosystem services, the stocks and flows of vital benefits flowing from nature to people. The second module describes InVEST, NatCap’s software tool for mapping, modeling, and valuing ecosystem services. In addition, it provides guidance on project scoping and on matching approaches and tools to a project’s goals, decision context, timeline, capacity, and quality of data available. Modules 3-4 offer an overview of the skills needed to use InVEST models, including recommendations for how to effectively summarize and communicate model outputs to stakeholders and other audiences.

Intended Audience

This course is intended for those interested in how natural capital approaches can inform decisions taken by governments, multi-lateral development institutions, the private and finance sectors, and non-governmental organizations. It can be a resource for individuals interested in simply learning about these concepts or for those interested in using the NatCap’s approaches and tools in research or to influence decisions. This course can also serve as a primer for those individuals planning to attend one of our in-person training workshops in the future.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course. However, we recommend that you download InVEST and GIS software (either QGIS or ArcGIS) if you intend to follow the technical examples or complete the optional assessments contained in modules 3 and 4.

Course Staff

Gregg Verutes

Geographer - Lead Instructor

Gregg Verutes leads NatCap's training program which hosts both introductory and technical workshops throughout the world. His current focus is developing innovative techniques that utilize maps, games, and problem-based exercises to teach students, scientists and practitioners about valuing nature. Gregg also serves as a GIS specialist for the marine team working on coastal zone management and spatial planning in Belize, Vietnam and the Americas. He worked previously for National Geographic as a GIS instructor and a visiting scientist with the World Wildlife Fund's Conservation Science Program. Gregg received his M.S. from San Diego State University and his B.S. in Policy Analysis and Management from Cornell University. 

Adrian Vogl

Senior Scientist

Adrian Vogl is leading the application of InVEST models for watershed services, and developing decision support models for spatial planning, permitting new infrastructure projects and mitigation, and targeting investments in watershed conservation. Adrian co-led development of the RIOS tool, in partnership with The Nature Conservancy and the Latin American Water Funds Platform. In addition, Adrian is leading efforts to link the InVEST economic valuation approach with outputs from other hydrologic models. Before joining the Natural Capital Project, Adrian worked in central Texas developing land-use planning decision support tools that incorporate freshwater and groundwater ecosystem services, land development, and conservation planning. Adrian received her Ph.D. in Aquatic Resources from Texas State University-San Marcos, and her B.A. from the University of Arizona in Cultural Anthropology.

Henry Borrebach

Training Coordinator

Henry Borrebach is on the Natural Capital Project's training team, overseeing online education and the annual Natural Capital Symposium, as well as coordinating NatCap trainings around the globe. Henry has extensive experience in applied pedagogy and international education, and he is passionate about making the science behind conservation accessible to the public. He is currently working with the team to develop online training courses that make NatCap's approach and tools available to a wider audience. Henry holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from Florida International University. Before joining the project, he co-founded the O, Miami international poetry festival. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to complete all the modules in the course?

While the lessons contained in each of the four modules are intended to stand alone, we strongly encourage all participants to begin by reading through the Course Roadmap. This section explains how the course is organized and provides important background information about the two case study examples included throughout. To launch the Course Roadmap, click the "Start here" button on the top-left panel of the Courseware.

Do you offer a Statement of Accomplishment for completing the course?

The course is structured to provide two levels of accomplishment. Students completing only Modules 1 and 2 will be provided with a Statement of Accomplishment for Intro to Ecosystem Services. Students who complete Modules 1 through 4 (including the 2 assessments) will receive a Statement of Accomplishment in Ecosystem Services and Applications.

Do I need to buy a textbook?

This course is completely free. Links to download all the necessary course materials and tools are provided within each unit.

How long should it take to complete this course?

The course is divided into four modules. It should take approximately one hour to finish each module and about four hours to complete the entire course.

What is the best way to ask questions or provide feedback?

Click on the "Discussion" tab to link to our online user forum. This forum is monitored daily by our software engineers and scientists.

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Date: 
Monday, October 6, 2014 to Monday, November 24, 2014
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About the Course

Giving 2.0: The MOOC, is a Stanford University-sponsored online course intended to teach givers of all ages, backgrounds, incomes and experiences to give more effectively. Taught by social entrepreneur, philanthropist and bestselling author Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen, Giving 2.0: The MOOC will teach you how to assess nonprofits, create a high-impact philanthropic strategy, volunteer more effectively, use existing, free technology for good and more. Course participants will engage in an actual grantmaking process during which up to $100,000 of Learning By Giving Foundation capital will be allocated to student-selected nonprofits.

Giving 2.0: The MOOC is a six-week course. Each week has a particular theme and 5-10 content-packed and activity-rich, video modules exploring that theme. Video modules will include lectures from Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen as well as interviews, discussions and lectures given by guest speakers. Guest speakers are renowned leaders in multiple industries including philanthropy, technology and business, who will provide unique insights into course topics. Students will have the opportunity to join Talkabouts – small virtual meeting groups created to discuss class-related topics. By the course’s conclusion, students will have created an Individual Giving Action Plan to guide their future giving in a highly effective and meaningful way. Students will also complete a formal nonprofit assessment. Students will consider and vote on eligible nonprofits and collaboratively determine which ones receive Learning By Giving Foundation grants. Students will also be provided with ongoing, post-MOOC philanthropy education content that will support continued development and execution of their philanthropic goals.

Recommended Background

This course reveals how anyone can be a high-impact philanthropist. There is nothing required except your generosity and a passion to improve our world.

Suggested Readings

There are no required readings for this course. However, the course is designed to work with the ideas and content from Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen’s book, Giving 2.0: Transform Your Giving and Our World (Wiley/Jossey Bass, 2011). The book can be found at all online sellers and in many bookstores. Here is the Amazon link. Other optional readings that will enhance your learning about each week’s theme will be listed on our course website.

Course Format

Our course will consist of lecture and guest speaker videos, each between 3-10 minutes in length. Most videos will contain integrated quiz questions (a scientifically proven way to increase information retention), small workbook activities and supplementary quizzes as needed. The two primary projects for our course are completing a comprehensive nonprofit assessment and creating your Individual Giving Action Plan. You will select a nonprofit you believe is creating significant social/environmental impact and will conduct an in-depth assessment of that nonprofit. Every completed nonprofit assessment will be eligible to receive potential funding during our student-run grantmaking process. You will also create your Individual Giving Action Plan, which will assess your unique resources and how you can most effectively translate those resources into helping transform both nonprofits and the lives of those they serve. There is no final exam (because I do not believe in tests!).

Instructor

Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen; Lecturer in Business Strategy, Stanford 

 


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Date: 
Thursday, July 10, 2014 to Friday, September 5, 2014
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This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights issues, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We will consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

The course focuses on "critical issues," namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include poverty; discrimination against women; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; forms of violence, in the home and in war and refugee circumstances; maternal health; and sex trafficking of women.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating a network of engaged participants to share experiences and to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises. We ask participants to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, track using #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr Tumblr:http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

 

 

FAQ: 

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth.

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. Please note that online courses do not include university credit.

COURSE STAFF

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the pasttwenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

Kevin Hsu

Kevin runs a design studio, Skyship Educational Design, developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and helped launch one of Stanford’s first social science MOOCs for a global audience, featuring Professor Larry Diamond on the topic of “Democratic Development.” He also teaches for the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University.


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Date: 
Friday, January 24, 2014
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This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights issues, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We will consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

The course focuses on "critical issues," namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include poverty; discrimination against women; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; forms of violence, in the home and in war and refugee circumstances; maternal health; and sex trafficking of women.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating a network of engaged students to share experiences and to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises. We ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

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Date: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2013 to Wednesday, December 11, 2013
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Course topic: 

A unique online course and multi-platform site dedicated to an interrogation of practice-based research in the arts. Users upload documentation and excerpts of work in progress alongside reflections with an emphasis placed on the intersections of creative and critical methodologies. This course centers on creating an opportunity for students to develop frameworks (context, tools and networks) which will enhance their ability to articulate practical-creative research within academic contexts. The online nature of this course stems from our desire to create an open forum for artist-scholars, national and international, who may wish to participate and form a convivial creative community of arts practitioners within the academy.

Practice Based Research in the Arts

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Date: 
Monday, April 1, 2013
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Course topic: 

Democratic Development is intended as a broad, introductory survey of the political, social, cultural, economic, institutional, and international factors that foster and obstruct the development and consolidation of democracy.  Each factor will be examined in historical and comparative perspective, with reference to a variety of different national experiences.  It is hoped that students in developing or prospective democracies will use the theories, ideas, and lessons in the class to help build or improve democracy in their own countries.

This course is primarily intended for individuals in college or beyond, with some academic background or preparation in political science or the social sciences. However, it seeks to be accessible and useful to a diverse international audience, including college students, instructors at the second and college levels, government officials, development professionals, civil society leaders, journalists, bloggers, activists, and individuals involved in a wide range of activities and professions related to the development and deepening of democracy.

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Date: 
Monday, October 1, 2012 to Monday, November 12, 2012
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This course focuses on the November 2012 election in the United States, and what it means for us, the state of California, the United States of America, and the globe. Led by David Kennedy (History, Stanford), Rob Reich (Political Science, Stanford), and James Steyer (CEO, Common Sense Media), the course brings together experts from Stanford’s faculty, along with distinguished participants in and analysts of American politics. Together, we will examine major topics at stake in the election, including foreign policy, the economy, the Supreme Court, campaign financing, and campaign strategy. In addition, one class session will put the 2012 election in a broader historical context, while another will focus on the election and its implications for California. New videos will be posted on Fridays. Please note that the post-election discussion will be posted on November 12.

WE STRONGLY ENCOURAGE ALL SUBSCRIBERS TO ELECTION 2012 TO PARTICIPATE IN THE CLASS BY JOINING THE COURSE DISCUSSION FORUM: http://www.piazza.com/election2012

At the discussion forum, you can contribute questions to be posed to the upcoming guests in each class session, vote up/down the questions of other students, and engage in discussion about each class session after it happens.

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