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Constitutional Law (Spring-2017)

Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 to Friday, June 9, 2017
Course topic: 

Registration opens February 27th. 

Fee applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In the wake of a transformative 2016 presidential election, there is no better time to study the United States Constitution. This course provides a brief primer on the Supreme Court and the US legal system, then explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. We will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion in Marbury v. Madison, as we discuss the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. Next, we will explore the ebb and flow of the commerce clause, and other aspects of legislative power. We will then discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including the constitutional implications of the “War on Terror.” Finally, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. With the Supreme Court (and the nation) undergoing rapid and unpredictable changes, we will surely have ample fodder to explore, discuss, and debate the Constitution. 

WHAT MAKES OUR ONLINE COURSES UNIQUE: 

  • Course sizes are limited.
    You won't have 5,000 classmates. This course's enrollment is capped at 45 participants.

  • Frequent interaction with the instructor.
    You aren't expected to work through the material alone. Instructors will answer questions and interact with students on the discussion board and through weekly video meetings.
  • Study with a vibrant peer group.
    Stanford Continuing Studies courses attract thoughtful and engaged students who take courses for the love of learning. Students in each course will exchange ideas with one another through easy-to-use message boards as well as optional weekly real-time video conferences.
  • Direct feedback from the instructor.
    Instructors will review and offer feedback on assignment submissions. Students are not required to turn in assignments, but for those who do, their work is graded by the instructor.
  • Courses offer the flexibility to participate on your own schedule.
    Course work is completed on a weekly basis when you have the time. You can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. If you can’t attend the weekly video meetings, the sessions are always recorded for you and your instructor is just an email away.
  • This course is offered through Stanford Continuing Studies.
    To learn more about the program, visit our About Us page. For more information on the online format, please visit the FAQ page.

Cody S. Harris, Partner, Keker Van Nest & Peters

Cody S. Harris clerked for Judge David S. Tatel on the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit and has served as a deputy district attorney in Santa Clara County. He received a JD from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks

Constitutional Law

Behind and Beyond Big Data (Summer '17)

Date: 
Monday, June 12, 2017

OVERVIEW

Starts online June 12, 2017

At Stanford July 25-28, 2017

How is big data transforming our world and changing business, government, and civil society? Discover, through an interdisciplinary lens, how big data is creating new knowledge and value, as well as new privacy and security challenges. Start learning online and then come to Stanford for a three-day, immersive experience. On campus, you’ll interact with Stanford and Silicon Valley experts, explore a range of applications, and collaborate on case studies. (Application and fee apply.)

EXPLORE

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

FEATURED EXPERTS INCLUDE

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinski, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Margaret Levi,, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

COURSE SCHEDULE

Applications open: NOW

Start online: June 12, 2017

Come to Stanford: July 25-28, 2017

Online content closes: September 4, 2017

Early Registration
Discount, 10%
$4,950
(ends May 15, 2017)

Early Registration, 10%
Alum/Non-Profit/Gov, 15% 
$4,208
(ends May 15, 2017)

Team Discount, 10%(each)
For 3 or more people attending together.

___________________
Standard Fee
$5,500

Standard Alum/Non-Profit/Gov Discount, 15%
$4,675

All discounts will be applied during registration.

PLEASE CONTACT

worldview@stanford.edu

APPLY

https://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x24954618751

ABOUT WORLDVIEW STANFORD

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford, which creates interdisciplinary media and learning experiences to engage and inform the public.

Big Data

Constitutional Law

Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2016
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The 2016 election is nearly upon us, and the Supreme Court hangs in the balance. This course provides a brief primer on the Supreme Court and the US legal system, then explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. We will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion inMarbury v. Madison, as we discuss the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. Next, we will explore the commerce clause, focusing on recent challenges to the Affordable Care Act. We will then discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including the constitutional implications of the “War on Terror.” Finally, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. With the Supreme Court (and the nation) poised on the brink of a potentially transformative election, there’s no better time to explore, discuss, and debate the Constitution. 

Constitutional Law

Behind and Beyond Big Data - (Fall 16')

Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2016

Starts online October 24, 2016

At Stanford: December 6-9, 2016

Accepting Applications:

February 15, 2016 – October 23, 2016

Application and Fee Apply.

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates interdisciplinary learning experiences for professionals to prepare them for the strategic challenges ahead.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

FEATURED EXPERTS

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Michal Kosinsk, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

  • Synthesize expert opinions from researchers and Silicon Valley innovators to understand big data's opportunities and challenges. Balance the tradeoffs between individual privacy and security and social value.
  • Apply strategies for leveraging the potential of big data while managing potential vulnerabilities, both personally and organizationally.
Big Data

Constitutional Law

Date: 
Monday, January 11, 2016
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal Supreme Court cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. After a brief refresher on the American legal and judicial system, we will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion in Marbury v. Madison, debating the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. We will next discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including what constitutional protections—if any—detainees held in Guantánamo Bay possess after Boumediene v. Bush. From there, we will explore the commerce clause, focusing on recent challenges to the Affordable Care Act. Together, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage. 

Constitutional Law

Behind and Beyond Big Data

Worldview Stanford
Accepting Applications:
January 1, 2015 - September 21, 2015
Course Starts Online:
September 21, 2015

Fee and Application.

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Course Description

What's driving big data?: We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new value?

Shifting power and influence: As data becomes even more valuable, who will own and control access to it? Will big data create information oligarchs or reduce inequality by giving access to people at the margins? How will brokers of big data influence our purchases, behavior, and beliefs?

Managing the tradeoffs: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Lucy Bernholz,

philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel,

computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Margaret Levi,

political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell,

computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

Jennifer Granick,

attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinski,

psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Big Data Continuing Studies

Constitutional Law

Date: 
Monday, June 22, 2015 to Friday, August 28, 2015
Course topic: 

This course is being offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Course Description

This course explores our nation’s founding charter and the seminal Supreme Court cases interpreting it. Using Supreme Court opinions as our guide, we will focus on the Constitution’s basic structure and design, investigating the principles of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers. After a brief refresher on the American legal and judicial system, we will begin with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinion in Marbury v. Madison , debating the Supreme Court’s role in reviewing legislative enactments. We will next discuss the executive branch’s role in foreign affairs, including what constitutional protections—if any—detainees held in Guantánamo Bay possess after Boumediene v. Bush. From there, we will explore the commerce clause, focusing on recent challenges to the Affordable Care Act. Together, we will unravel the equal protection and due process clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, wading into some of the Court’s more controversial pronouncements on race and gender discrimination, examine basic First Amendment principles concerning freedom of speech and religion.

Application and fee apply.

Constitutional Law Continuing Studies

The Future of Food: Scenario Planning Training

Worldview Stanford
Coming Soon.
This course is offered through WORLDVIEW Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates learning experiences for professionals to help them get smarter about the complex issues and dynamics shaping the future.

Fee and Application.

Course Description

This unique course combines hands-on training in the scenario planning methodology with a deep exploration of the environmental, economic and social uncertainties that will shape the future of what we eat, where our food comes from, and whether we will be able to count on its supply and safety in the coming decades.

Online: Get grounded in the latest research and perspectives on the future of the global food system. Learn about some of the biggest challenges—from climate change, population growth, changes in consumption, agricultural practices, and political disputes—as well as the opportunities for boosting resilience through scientific, technological and social advances. 

At Stanford: Develop Scenarios on the Future of Food to 2030. Tap Stanford experts on food to deepen your knowledge. Learn—by doing—the original scenario methodology pioneered by Royal Dutch Shell and Global Business Network, working directly with seasoned practitioners.

  • Identify driving forces and critical uncertainties
  • Develop a scenario framework, stories, and implications
  • Learn scenario planning tips and best practices

Featured Experts

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Chris Field,

climate scientist and co-chairman of IPCC Working Group II

Meg Caldwell,

environmental lawyer and Executive Director of the Center for Ocean Solutions

David Lobell,

expert on food and agriculture, Deputy Director, Stanford Center of Food Security and the Environment

Buzz Thompson,

natural resource attorney and co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute

The Future of Food Scenario Training

The Science of Decision Making

Date: 
Monday, March 13, 2017

OVERVIEW

New program; lower tuition!

Start online March 13, 2017; Come to Stanford April 27, 2017

Harness the power of your brain! Discover how the latest research in neuroscience, psychology, law, economics, and business can help you predict, influence, and improve decision making. Start learning online and then come to campus for an immersive one-day experience, interacting with Stanford faculty and exploring leading-edge tools and technologies.

EXPLORE

The Brain: How the brain decides and the critical roles played by pleasure and pain, memory and experience

Behavior: How cultural, developmental, contextual and emotional influences play out in our brains and shape our choices.

Influence: How we use persuasion, incentives, choice architecture, and appeals to beliefs and values to influence the decisions of others.

Improvement: How new research and techniques can help you make creative, reasoned, satisfying, and responsible decisions—individually and with others.

FEATURED EXPERTS INCLUDE

Bill Burnett, design visionary, Stanford d.school
David Demarest, vice president of public affairs, Stanford; former head of public affairs at Bank of America, Visa
Kara Fitzpatrick, clinical psychologist, Stanford Medical School
Hazel Markus, social psychologist, Stanford University
Lindred Greer, assistant professor, organizational behavior, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Bill Newsome, neurobiologist, head of the Stanford Neuroscience Institute, and co-chair of Obama’s BRAIN Initiative
And more...

COURSE SCHEDULE

Applications open: NOW
Start online: March 13, 2017
Come to Stanford: April 27, 2017
Online content closes: June 5, 2017

TUITION

$1750 (covers online materials and on-campus program)
15% non-profit/government/Stanford alumni discount
10% early registration discount (deadline February 6, 2017)

APPLY https://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x249462554ee

PLEASE CONTACT
worldview@stanford.edu

ABOUT WORLDVIEW STANFORD
This course is offered through Worldview Stanford, which creates interdisciplinary media and learning experiences to engage and inform the public.

The science of decision making

Behind and Beyond Big Data

Date: 
Monday, April 18, 2016

Accepting Applications 

November 25, 2015 – April 11, 2016 

Course Starts Online: 

April 18, 2016 

Come to Stanford: 

May 31-June 3, 2016 

Fee and Application. 

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates interdisciplinary learning experiences for professionals to prepare them for the strategic challenges ahead. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly? 

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and value? 

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society? 

FEATURED EXPERTS 

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including: 

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society 

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks 

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy 

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society 

Michal Kosinski, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business 

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy 

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

Big Data

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