Skip to content Skip to navigation

Medicine & Health

Topic Image: 
Medicine
Date: 
Monday, March 30, 2015
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Overview

Physicians are expected to be calm, cool, and collected when confronted with undifferentiated, critically ill patients. The specialty of Emergency Medicine (EM) centers on rapidly sorting, assessing, and stabilizing undifferentiated patients regardless of the etiology of their condition. This course will teach healthcare providers the necessary skills to recognize and manage patients with life-threatening emergencies, with an emphasis on a methodical approach to patient evaluation and the importance of time-sensitive emergency interventions. The hands-on skills workshop focuses on essential emergency medicine skills (e.g., bag mask ventilation, needle thoracostomy), allowing course participants to practice these hands-on emergency techniques under the guidance of their instructors. Video discussions of the online cases with an expert clinician provide practical answers and insightful commentary. All course participants are administered pre- and post-tests to assess the efficacy of the program.

You will learn:

  • Methodological approach to patient evaluation and emergency interventions
  • Emergency medicine skills (e.g., bag mask ventilation, needle thoracostomy)
  • Address common medical myths

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, September 15, 2017
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Overview

This self-paced course is designed to train participants to enter clinical cancer cases into the Exotic Tumor Database (ETD) correctly and efficiently. The ETD is a project of the Exotic Species Cancer Research Alliance. It is designed primarily for those with a medical background and training in common veterinary medical terminology. Our primary audience is veterinary technicians and veterinary students who are helping exotics vets and zoo vets to enter their tumor cases into the ETD. Pre-vet or pre-med undergraduate students who are working with a veterinarian on entering cases may also enroll.

You will learn:

  • Enter clinical cancer cases into the Exotic Tumor Database
  • Interpret veterinary medical records
  • Contribute to research in comparative oncology

Prerequisites: None
Cost: Free


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Tuesday, January 30, 2018
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Overview

Viral hepatitis is one of the greatest public health problems in the world, with deaths that surpass HIV/AIDS. Most of the deaths among the estimated 350-400 million people living with undiagnosed or untreated chronic hepatitis B or C infection are caused by liver cancer or liver cirrhosis. Stopping transmission, reducing chronic viral hepatitis complications, and ending disease stigma and discrimination will eliminate the problem of hepatitis. KNOW HBVHCV is a self-paced training course developed for practitioners and students in primary care and public health. It was developed by the Asian Liver Center at Stanford in collaboration with the General Department of Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health of Vietnam and is based on the best available data and technical guidelines from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

You will learn:

  • Burden of chronic hepatitis B and C and liver cancer in Vietnam and around the world
  • Types of viral hepatitis and transmission routes, diagnosis, and immunization
  • Prevention of blood-borne infections and management of needlestick injury

Prerequisites: None.
Cost: Free.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Saturday, February 27, 2016
Go to Course
Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This self-paced course teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, and issues in publication and peer review. We will review principles of effective writing, examples of good and bad writing, and tips for making the writing process easier. We will also examine issues specific to scientific writing, including: authorship, peer review, the format of an original manuscript, and communicating science for lay audiences. Participants will watch video lectures, complete quizzes and editing exercises, write two short papers, and edit each other’s work.  Participants from non-science disciplines can benefit from the training provided in the course.

You will learn:

  • Principles of effective writing
  • Issues in scientific writing, publication, and peer review
  • Communicate with the general public

Prerequisites: Fluency in English.
Cost: Free.

 


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, December 15, 2017 to Saturday, May 23, 2020
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Office of Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity provides education on unconscious bias in the academic medicine workplace. Existing research on unconscious bias will provide a science-based view of this seemingly non-science topic. Case studies with examples of unconscious bias, self-assessment opportunities, and exploring bias busting strategies will enable learners to understand how to bring the content into their own unique environments.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians from all specialties as well as other Health Care Professionals.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 23, 2017
  • Expiration Date: May 23, 2020
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.00 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.
  • * Participation in content marked Optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the effects of unconscious bias in everyday interactions with patients, students, colleagues, and team members.
  • Apply specific “bias-busting” techniques that can be used in the medical and academic environment.
  • Identify where personal unconscious biases may reside across gender, race/ethnicity, and/or cultural attributes in the workplace.
  • Develop strategies to correct personal unconscious biases in daily interactions.

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Course Description

Every healthcare provider responding to a disaster should have foundational knowledge of disaster medicine. This self-paced course will help you explore the foundation for SEMPER disaster knowledge using videos lectures and case scenarios, which will be supplemented by in-person lectures as well as field exercises. This course was developed through SEMPER, Stanford Emergency Medicine Program for Emergency Response.

SEMPER’s mission has 3 pillars:

1. Develop nimble medical teams that could “load and go” into a disaster scene within 24 hours of a call and to be self-sufficient for the first 72 hours.

2. Develop a standardized disaster medicine education curriculum and training for all members.

3. Pursue research to develop disaster best practices in order to improve disaster medical care.


While all SEMPER members are required to complete this course, non-SEMPER members interested in learning more about disaster medicine or any person wishing to deploy to a disaster are also welcome to complete this course. There will be a pre-test as well as a post-test upon completion of all the modules 

You will learn:

• Foundation for SEMPER

• Develop best practices for disaster relief

• Pursue research in disaster medicine


Prerequisite(s): None.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, August 25, 2017 to Friday, October 16, 2020
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Although dementia is the most common diagnosis in older adulthood it is under-recognized in primary care. This gap in recognition is even greater for patients, their caregivers and families who belong to various ethnic and racial minority populations. As U.S. residents are aging, and becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, physicians and other healthcare providers will increasingly need to tailor their care to specific populations.

This series of continuing education activities is designed to help healthcare providers recognize dementia, select culturally appropriate assessment tools, and communicate effectively about dementia care in ethnically and racially diverse populations. This course, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: South Asian American Populations, will provide information on assessing and caring for Dementia patients, their families, and caregivers in South Asian American Populations.

The initial course in the series, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment, should be taken prior to other courses in the series as it addresses the diagnosis and treatment of Dementia, while this course addresses best practices, cultural information, and appropriate assessment tools for South Asian American populations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in primary care, family practice, internal medicine and psychiatry specialties and nurses and social workers who work with older people.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: August 25, 2017
  • Expiration Date: August 25, 2020
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Select culturally appropriate dementia assessment tools for South Asian American patients.
  • Utilize strategies to communicate effectively about dementia care with the families of patients with dementia from South Asian American backgrounds.

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017
Course topic: 
Go To Course

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course is designed for anyone over the age of 18 who is interested in learning, developing and maintaining healthy eating, exercise, and sleep habits. The primary objective of this program is to educate students on healthy eating, fitness, and body image and encourage them to apply the information learned to their own lives. Our aim is to provide students with evidence-based, accessible and affordable tools that can guide them on how to maintain a healthy, happy and mindful life in the long-term. Each module contains weekly goal check-ins, self-monitoring logs that track the user’s eating, exercise and sleep habits, psycho-educational reading material about a particular topic (e.g., exercise, nutritional foods, the relationship between the media and food, etc), relevant video(s) and pictures, and goal-setting exercises in which users are asked to design their exercise and fitness goals around the framework of the given module. This course is designed to be fully online and accessible from any location. Finally, this course is intended to be self-directed and to be utilized at the user’s own pace, however we suggest completing 1 session per week. Please note that this program is not considered to be a weight loss program. Rather, it has been designed with the intention of being offered as a weight maintenance program aimed at teaching students how to develop healthy, long-term lifestyle changes.

PREREQUISITES

No prerequisites are necessary for this course. All individuals who are over the age of 18 are welcome to join this program.

COURSE STAFF

Dr. Craig Barr Taylor, Stanford University

Dr. Barr Taylor is a Professor of Psychiatry, Emeritus, through the Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, the Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Behavioral Medicine and was formerly the Director of the Stanford Psychiatry Residency Training Program for 15 years. Dr. Taylor has a secondary appointment at Palo Alto University as a research faculty member and is the Creator and Co-Director of the Center for m2Health. Throughout the span of his extensive career, Dr. Taylor has been awarded a countless number of grants from the National Institue of Health (NIH), has collaborated with the top researchers in the clinical field across the globe, has become an expert on the etiology, maintenance and treatment of anxiety disorders, PTSD, eating disorders, major depressive disorder, cardiovascular disease, smoking cessation, and more, and has authored over hundreds of articles relating to these disorders. In the last two decades, Dr. Taylor has become well regarded as a pioneer in the field of mobile mental health technology for his work on developing and implementing technologically-enhanced interventions. He is committed to providing affordable, accessible, tailored and evidence-based treatment to individuals in need, especially those who are particularly vulnerable to the aforementioned disorders, such as college students. In recognition of his work, Dr. Taylor was elected to The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters in 2002 and was recently awarded the Lori Irving Award of Excellence in Prevention by the National Eating Disorders Association for his groundbreaking research on identifying and treating risk factors for women suffering from eating disorders. Given their combined expertise on eating disorder and obesity prevention, Dr. Taylor co-developed the StayingFit program with Dr. Denise Wilfley at Washington University in St. Louis with the hope that students worldwide could benefit from the health and fitness tips that are offered in the program. 

 

Dr. Denise Wilfley, Washington University in St. Louis

Dr. Wilfley is the Scott Rudolph University Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics, and Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Director of the Weight Management and Eating Disorders Program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Over the past two decades, she has been awarded more than $25 million from the NIH in a programmatic line of research examining the causes, characterization, prevention, and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. She has extensive experience in developing efficacious interventions to treat and prevent obesity and excess weight gain among children and adults. She also has extensive experience as the lead investigator on numerous clinical trials, and much of this work has focused on identifying and intervening with groups at high risk for obesity and eating disorders. This has allowed for the honing of resources to most effectively prevent progression of negative health outcomes such as Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and metabolic syndromes. In addition to her research, Dr. Wilfley has an illustrious history of serving in leadership roles in advocacy and research societies for obesity and eating disorders. She has long been an external advisor for obesity programs and centers across the country, such as Wellspring Healthy Living Academy, Minnesota Obesity Center, and University of Alabama-Birmingham’s Nutrition Obesity Research Center. She has also been a long-standing member of the Eating Disorders Research Society (EDRS), is a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders and a member of the National Eating Disorders Association Research Advisory Council.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is this course meant to provide medical advice?

No, this course is meant to be educational and is not meant to serve in place of treatment. Should you have any further questions or concerns about receiving treatment, please refer to our resources page for referral information. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this course.

Is a textbook required for this course?

No, you will not need a textbook for this course. All necessary materials are included in the weekly sessions or attached as a PDF.

Are any of the assignments graded for this course?

No, none of the assignments will be graded. This was purposeful as we really wanted users to be able to learn the material without feeling any addded pressure! Please note that this means that you cannot earn a Statement of Accomplishment at the end of this course.

Is there a discussion board in this course?

No, there is no discussion board. If you have any questions concerning the content of the program, please contact our course team members by emailing us at stayingfit.lagunita@gmail.com. Thanks!

Who should I contact if I have any questions about the course?

All questions concerning the content of the StayingFit program can be directed to the course team at stayingfit.lagunita@gmail.com. For all other technical questions about the course, please feel free to send the Stanford Online course support team a message by clicking on the Help tab that displays on all https://lagunita.stanford.edu pages.

Is there a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

At this time, there is no Statement of Accomplishment for this course.


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 to Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Go to Course

Course Overview

“I learned early on that sports is a part of life, that it is human life in microcosm, and that the virtues and flaws of the society exist in sports even as they exist everywhere else.”- Howard Cosell


Athletic competitions are prominent in the modern American university. The evolution of collegiate athletics relies on many factors, including gender perceptions, payment issues, and its intersection with American college life. With this course, you will gain a deeper understanding of the important and complex role athletic tradition plays in American higher education.


You will explore how athletic competition has changed over time and learn about the growth and development of sports in American college life. This course takes a deep dive into attitudes about the value of the athlete and competitive sport in our society, debates about amateur vs. professional, athletic training, issues of class and gender in sports, and the aesthetics of the athletic body.

You will learn:

  • Attitudes surrounding competitive sports in modern day college life
  • Issues of class, race, and gender in sports
  • Economics involved with athletic competition


Prerequisite(s): None
Registration Fee: Free


View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017
Go to Course
Course topic: 

About this course

This course introduces learners to a variety of infectious diseases using a patient-centered, story-based approach. Through illustrated, short videos, learners will follow the course of each patient’s illness, from initial presentation to resolution. Integrating the relevant microbiology, pathophysiology and immunology, this course aims to engage and entice the learner towards future studies in microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases.

The patient-centered videos included in this course were created as part of the Re-imagining Medical Education initiative, led by Charles Prober MD, Senior Associate Dean of Medical Education at the Stanford School of Medicine. This initiative was the first of its kind to explore the collaborative creation of foundational medical education online content by inter-institutional teams of faculty. The content presented in this course was created by faculty from Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with The University of Washington School of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, UCSF School of Medicine, and The University of Michigan Medical School. Support for this initiative was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Burke Family Foundation.

PLEASE NOTE

Information provided in this course is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be used for diagnostic and/or treatment purposes.

Who is this class for: This course is primarily aimed at anyone with an interest in human health.
Created by: Stanford University

Enrollment: Free and fee options

Instructor(s): 
Maya Adam

View All Courses

Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Medicine & Health