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Medicine & Health

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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity provides a practical approach to the management of common outpatient infections by the primary care provider through the use of didactic videos, patient role plays and interactive case based video. National guidelines will be reviewed with emphasis on the most appropriate empiric antibiotic choice and duration of therapy. Video role plays will demonstrate communication skills that can be used with patients regarding appropriate antibiotic usage.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in family practice, primary care, internal medicine, ObGyn and pharmacists.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: TBD
  • Expiration Date: TBD
  • Estimated Time to Complete: TBD
  • CME/CPE Credits Offered: TBD
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME/CPE CREDITS

  • To Obtain CME Credits
  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the Post-test, Evaluation Survey, and Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Define the scope and implications of antibiotic misuse in the outpatient setting.
  • Recognize when antimicrobials are indicated in common outpatient infections.
  • Select the most appropriate empiric antimicrobial choice and duration of therapy for common outpatient bacterial infections.
  • Employ effective communication strategies when discussing antibiotic decisions with patients.
  • Define the scope and implications of antibiotic misuse in the outpatient setting.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Case 1. Sinus congestion
  3. Case 2. Bumps, lumps and pus
  4. Case 3. Red leg
  5. Case 4. Cough
  6. Case 5. Positive urine culture
  7. Case 6. Sore throat
  8. Case 7. Dysuria
  9. Course Wrap-up
  10. Resources and References
  11. Help!
Improving Antibiotic Use

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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity focuses on the science of e-cigarettes – particularly health risks and benefits. Based on observed patterns in questions from real patients and answers from practicing physicians, we emphasize potential health impacts of e-cigarettes and regulated alternatives such as nicotine replacement therapy. Video role-playing opportunities focus on special issues related to youth, pregnancy, and use by parents and patients in perioperative phase, cancer treatment or cardiovascular disease treatment. Online learners are engaged through role-play, expert interviews, and interactive activities.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in cardiology, family practice, primary care, general surgery, internal medicine, oncology, pediatrics, psychiatry and others in Ob-Gyn.

Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Investigate new information about e-cigarette risks and benefits.
  • Evaluate the quality of e-cigarette information and interpret risks and benefits of e-cigarettes based on scientific evidence.
  • Develop informed professional opinions about when to warn against or recommend e-cigarettes.
  • Assess e-cigarette use in all patients who currently use tobacco.
  • Apply evidence-based brief tobacco/nicotine cessation counseling (5’As Ask-Advise-Assess-Assist-Arrange) protocol in instances where patients ask about e-cigarettes.
  • Counsel patients who are using or considering using e-cigarettes to attempt cessation with FDA-approved NRT or pharmacotherapy.
E-Cigarettes

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Overview

New research shows that genetic variations continue to accrue throughout tumor development. Having the ability to conduct deep sequencing on the healthy and cancerous cells in a patient, at multiple stages of growth and treatment, has led to invaluable findings and new directions for analyses in the field.

This course explores the role of genomics in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Providing a greater view of mutations through tumor profiling, more targeted and personalized health care can be administered and positively impact disease outcomes. Discover the latest research advancing the study of cancer and the power of genomics in medical decision making.

This course is an elective course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You Will Learn

  • Assessments of hereditary risk through multi-gene panel screens
  • Classifications of cancers by genomic differences
  • Evolutions of cancer cells that cause treatment resistance
  • New technologies for non-invasive analyses
  • Spectrums and sub-types of cancer mutations

Instructors

Tuition

  • $495 per Elective Course

 

Cancer Genomics

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Date: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2016
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged students. We will ask students to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

FAQs

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

 

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

 

COURSE STAFF

Course Staff Image #1

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

Course Staff Image #2

Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

International Women's Health and Human Rights

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Date: 
Sunday, September 4, 2016 to Friday, August 31, 2018
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course seeks to fulfill the clinical community’s need to improve skills in the critical evaluation of clinical research papers. Competency in critical appraisal skills can have a significant impact by improving clinical practice, quality of research projects, and peer-review of manuscripts and grants. The course will utilize efficient and engaging videos with relevant clinical examples to cover essential research methodology principles. The online format will provide opportunities for self-paced learning and practicing critical appraisal of a variety of published studies that evaluate benefit, harm, and prognosis.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for national and international physicians, medical researchers, residents, fellows, and allied health professionals in all specialties.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: September 4, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
    • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
    • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
    • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
    • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

*Participation in any content marked optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:
    • Analyze the concepts of randomization and blinding in reducing bias.
    • Develop strategies to critically appraise randomized clinical trials and determine if study results are valid.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Key Design Concepts
  3. Analyzing Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) Data
  4. Evaluating a Clinical Trial
  5. Course Wrap-up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

  • Steven Goodman, MD, PhD, MHS
    Professor of Medicine and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)
    Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Course Director
  • Rita Popat, MSPT, MS, PhD
    Clinical Associate Professor, 
    Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Co-Course Director
    Author/Presenter
  • Sarah Osmundson, MD
    Clinical Assistant Professor, 
    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Content Reviewer
  • Raymond Deng, MS
    Medical Student 
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Planner

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

  • Mike McAuliffe
    Stanford EdTech
  • Jim Neighbours
    SCCME
  • Greg Bruhns
    Stanford Online

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser
  • You must have javascript enabled

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Guyatt GH, Rennie D. Users' guides to the medical literature. JAMA. 1993;270:2096-2097.

Guyatt GH, Sackett DL, Cook DJ. Users' guides to the medical literature II. How to use an article about therapy or prevention. B. What were the results and will they help me in caring for my patients? Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group.JAMA. 1994;271:59-63.

Guyatt GH, Sackett DL, Cook DJ. Users' guides to the medical literature. II. How to use an article about therapy or prevention. A. Are the results of the study valid? Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA. 1993;270:2598-2601.

Oxman AD, Sackett DL, Guyatt GH. Users' guides to the medical literature. I. How to get started. The Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA. 1993;270:2093-2095.

Schulz KF, Altman DG, Moher D; CONSORT Group. CONSORT 2010 statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomized trials. Ann Intern Med. 2010; 152(11):726-32.

Thinking Critically

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Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2016
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Application and Fee Apply.

This course is offered through Worldview Stanford. Worldview Stanford is an innovative Stanford University initiative that creates interdisciplinary learning experiences for professionals to prepare them for the strategic challenges ahead.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

What's driving big data? We increasingly live our social, economic, and intellectual lives in the digital realm, enabled by new tools and technologies. These activities generate massive data sets, which in turn refine the tools. How will this co-evolution of technology and data reshape society more broadly?

Creating new knowledge and value: Big data changes what can be known about the world, transforming science, industries, and culture in the process. It reveals solutions to social problems and allows products and services to be even more targeted. Where will big data create the greatest sources of new understanding and new value?

Shifting power, security, and privacy: The promise of big data is accompanied by perils—in terms of control, privacy, security, reputation, and social and economic disruption. How will we manage these tradeoffs individually and in business, government, and civil society?

  • Synthesize expert opinions from researchers and Silicon Valley innovators to understand big data's opportunities and challenges. Balance the tradeoffs between individual privacy and security and social value.
  • Apply strategies for leveraging the potential of big data while managing potential vulnerabilities, both personally and organizationally.

FEATURED EXPERTS

Learn from a variety of sources and Stanford experts, including:

Lucy Bernholz, philanthropy, technology, and policy scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Sharad Goel, computational scientist studying politics, media, and social networks

Jennifer Granick, attorney and director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Michal Kosinsk, psychologist and computational scientist studying online and organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Margaret Levi, political scientist specializing in governance, trust, and legitimacy

John Mitchell, computer scientist, cybersecurity expert, and Vice Provost of Teaching and Learning

 

Big Data

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Date: 
Tuesday, July 5, 2016 to Friday, August 12, 2016
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Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mind-set that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings. 

This is an online course. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online videoconferencing sessions.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Kelly McGonigal, Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE), Stanford

Kelly McGonigal teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. In collaboration with CCARE, she has conducted scientific research on the benefits of compassion training. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford. She is the author of The Upside of Stress and The Willpower Instinct. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford.

Textbooks for this course

(Recommended) McGonigal, The Upside of Stress (ISBN 978-1583335611)

 

The Upside of Stress

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Date: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
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Course topic: 

Now Open!

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Although dementia is the most common diagnosis in older adulthood it is under-recognized in primary care. This gap in recognition is even greater for patients, their caregivers and families who belong to various ethnic and racial minority populations. As U.S. residents are aging, and becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, physicians and other healthcare providers will increasingly need to tailor their care to specific populations.

This series of continuing education activities is designed to help healthcare providers recognize dementia, select culturally appropriate assessment tools, and communicate effectively about dementia care in ethnically and racially diverse populations. This course, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: Latino Populations, will provide information on assessing and caring for Dementia patients, their families, and caregivers in Latino/Hispanic American Populations.

The initial course in the series, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment, should be taken prior to other courses in the series as it addresses the diagnosis and treatment of Dementia, while this course addresses best practices, cultural information, and appropriate assessment tools for Latino/Hispanic American populations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in primary care, family practice, internal medicine and psychiatry specialties and nurses and social workers who work with older people.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 19, 2016
  • Expiration Date: May 19, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Select culturally appropriate dementia assessment tools for Latino/Hispanic American patients.
  • Utilize strategies to communicate effectively about dementia care with the families of patients with dementia from Latino/Hispanic American backgrounds.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1. Latino/Hispanic American Background
  3. Module 2. Measures and Assessments
  4. Module 3. Caregiving
  5. Course Wrap-Up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

DISCLOSURES

As the content of this CME activity is not related to the products or services of a commercial interest, the following planners and speaker have no relevant financial relationships to identify and no conflicts of interest to disclose:

Nancy Morioka-Douglas, MD, MPH
Clinical Professor, General Medicine Disciplines
Stanford University School of Medicine
Medical Director for Patient Centered Care in Primary Care, Stanford Health Care
Co-Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Course Director

Dolores Gallagher-Thompson, PhD 
Professor of Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Co-Course Director
Speaker

Nusha Askari, PhD 
Program Manager
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Kala Mehta, DSc, MPH
Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco
Program Evaluation Consultant, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Yuan Marian Tzuang, MSW 
Program Coordinator, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Planner

Annecy Majoros, BA
Research Assistant
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
Program Assistant
Department of Medicine/General Internal Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Consuelo Juarez, BA
Executive Director at Senior Talent Inc.
Planner

Irene Valverde, MFTI
Hartnell College
Planner

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Jim Neighbours
Stanford Center for CME

Jenny Xu
SGEC Instructional Designer

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alvarez, P., Rengifo, J., Emrani, T., & Gallagher-Thompson, D. (2013). Latino older adults and mental health: A review and commentary.Clinical Gerontologist, 37(1), 33-48. Published in the Special Issue on Late-Life Diversity.

Alzheimer’s Association. (2009). California Alzheimer’s Data Report. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from http://www.alz.org/CAdata/ .

Alzheimer's Association. (2015). 2015 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 11(3),  332-384.

Aranda, M.P. (2001). Racial and ethnic factors in dementia care-giving research in the US. Aging & Mental Health, 5(001), 116-123.

Beck, A.T. (1979). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. New York, NY: Penguin Books USA Inc.

Borson, S., Scanlan, J., Brush, M., Vitallano, P., & Dokmak, A. (2000).  The Mini-Cog: A cognitive ‘vital signs’ measure for dementia screening in multi-lingual elderly. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15(11), 1021-1027.

More bibliographic information can be found in the Resources and References section.

©2016 Stanford University School of Medicine

 

Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: Latino Populations

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Date: 
Monday, May 23, 2016 to Thursday, May 31, 2018
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Course topic: 

Now Open!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

We find ourselves facing global epidemics of obesity and diabetes. To address these public health crises, we urgently need to explore innovative educational strategies for physicians and the general public. Physicians who eat a healthy, balanced diet and who understand what that entails, are more effective at counseling their patients to improve their health behaviors.

This CME activity provides a practical approach to supporting healthy eating for a variety of medical needs. Through the use of didactic videos, animated cases, and interactive activities course participants will gain proficiency in recommending well-established nutritional practices and assessing barriers to healthy eating for patients and physicians alike. By evaluating personal eating behaviors and barriers to healthy eating, physicians will emerge from the course better equipped to support sustainable positive change in their patients’ food choices while simultaneously having an opportunity to embark on optimizing their own nutritional health.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians in primary care, family practice, and internal medicine as well as nurse practitioners, physician assistants and allied health professionals involved in nutritional assessment and education of patients.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 23, 2016
  • Expiration Date: May 23, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2.5 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.50
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the fundamental principles of nutrition.
  • Conduct a motivational interview and nutritional assessment in a primary care setting using evidence-based techniques and tools.
  • Formulate a strategy based on a nutritional assessment to improve their health and their patients’ health.
  • Guide patients and themselves through iterative, targeted goals to improve nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Provide patients with skills-based learning resources to support their achievement of targeted nutrition goals.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Test Your Knowledge
  3. Module 1. The Rationale for Physicians
  4. Module 2. Food & Health
  5. Module 2. Talking to Patients
  6. Module 4. Communicating with your Patient about Food
  7. Module 5. Following Up with Patients
  8. Course Wrap-Up
  9. Resources and References
  10. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Maya Adam, MD
Lecturer
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Speaker

Tim Dang, BA
Teaching Assistant, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Jennifer Dietz, MA
Director of Evaluation, Student Affairs
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Michael Pollan, MA
James S. And John L. Knight Professor of Journalism
University of California, Berkeley, School of Journalism
Speaker

The following speaker indicated having relevant financial relationships with industry to disclose: 

David Eisenberg, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor of Nutrition, Dept. of Nutrition
T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Speaker
FareWell, Campus for Health (Japan), and CKK Health Products Group (China): Consulting

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Kim Walker, Ph.D.
IRT EdTech

William Bottini
IRT EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

ROLE PLAY ACTORS

Tracy A. Rydel, MD
Therese Truong, PA

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cordain L, Eaton SB, Sebastian A, et al. Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century. The American journal of clinical nutrition. 2005;81(2):341-354.

Willett WC, Dietz WH, Colditz GA. Guidelines for healthy weight. N Engl J Med 1999; 341: 427-434

World Health Organization. "Global Database on Body Mass Index." WHO :: Global Database on Body Mass Index. 2006. Accessed January 29, 2016, http://apps.who.int/bmi/index.jsp.

For a complete list, please view the References/Bibliography page in the Course.

©2016 Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford Introduction to Food and Health (CME)

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Course Description

Stem cells provide enormous potential for the field of regenerative medicine. Their ability to become any type of cell-blood, heart, brain, bones, skin, muscles, etc.-offers hope for effective treatments, or perhaps even reversal of, a disease.

This course will advance your understanding of cell-based therapies and show you what it is being done today to develop and deliver them. Discover new ways to restore organ and tissue function for the treatment of chronic diseases, genetic disorders and serious injuries. Get a glimpse inside the laboratory of medical researchers who are pioneering stem cell therapeutics.

This course is an elective course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You Will Learn

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Instructors

Chris Bjornson, Research Associate, Stanford University

Michele Calos, Professor of Genetics, Stanford University

Jane Lebkowski, President of Research and Development, Asterias

Matt Porteus, Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cancer Biology), Stanford University

Soeren Turan, Instructor, Stanford University

Joseph Wu, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology, Stanford University

Additional Resources

*This certificate neither substitutes for, nor leads to, being board certified as a genetic counselor (ABGC) or clinical geneticist (ABMG)


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