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Medicine
Date: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 to Thursday, August 31, 2017
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Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

This CME activity will present a practical approach to several high-risk emergency conditions that can present to office-based practices. The course instructors will describe the immediate recognition and management of these complex patients through a discussion of specific video case-based scenarios and a review of current, evidence-based practice interspersed with interactive self assessments. By learning and applying these high-yield principles, course participants will be able to optimize patient outcomes.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for family physicians, primary care physicians, general surgeons, oncologists, and psychiatrists.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: September 4, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Administer high quality CPR in the first moments of recognizing a patient in cardiac arrest.
  • Identify and effectively manage patients with anaphylaxis.
  • Effectively manage patients presenting with severe asthma prior to transfer to the emergency department.
  • Appropriately risk-stratify acute chest pain patients to reduce misdiagnosis and delays in evaluation and treatment.
  • Identify and effectively manage patients in status epilepticus.
  • Conduct rapid, bedside evaluations to evaluate and differentiate patients with low, moderate, and high risk syncope presentations.
  • Conduct a clinical office space assessment of the essential equipment and operational improvements necessary for managing emergencies.
  • Effectively communicate with EMS and Emergency Physicians while managing emergencies.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Basic Life Support
  3. Anaphylaxis
  4. Asthma
  5. Chest Pain
  6. Seizure
  7. Syncope
  8. Office Emergencies
  9. Effective Communication
  10. Course Wrap-up
  11. Resources and References
  12. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Swaminatha Mahadevan, MD
Associate Professor of Surgery, Emergency Medicine
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Presenter

Matthew Strehlow, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery, Emergency Medicine
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Presenter

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actors


Derek Yee 
Heather Kellogg 
Michael Abts 
Richard Farrell 
Pamela Nemecek 
Valerie WeakLance Huntley 
Rotimi Agbabiaka 
Radhika Rao 
Peter D'Souza 
Marc Andreas Schaub 
Kimberly Walker

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html.

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Ticket Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Bibliography

High-Quality CPR
Meaney PA, et al. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and outside the hospital: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2013;128:417-35.

Preparing Your Office for Emergencies
Toback, SL. Medical Emergency Preparedness in Office Practice. Am Fam Physician. 2007;75:1679-84.

Syncope
Costantino G. et al. Syncope Risk Stratification Tools vs Clinical Judgment: An Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2014:127;1126.e13-1126e25.

Costantino G, Furlan R. Syncope Risk Stratification in the Emergency Department. ­­­ Cardiol Clin. 2013:31;27-38.

Benditt D, Adkisson WO. Approach to the Patient with Syncope. Cardiol Clin. 2013:31;9-25.

Anaphylaxis
Simons FE, et al. World Allergy Organization Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Anaphylaxis. WAO Journal. 2011:4;413-37.

Chest Pain
O’Gara PT, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013;61:e78-140.

Asthma
Okelo SO, et al. Interventions to Modify Health Care Provider Adherence to Asthma Guidelines: A Systematic Review. Pediatrics.  2013;132:517-34.

Cates CJ, et al. Holding Chambers (Spacers) Versus Nebulisers for Beta-Agonist Treatment of Acute Asthma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013; Sep 13;9.

Seizures
Claassen J, et al. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Status Epilepticus. Neurocrit Care. 2012:Suppl1:S73-8.

Silbergleit R, et al. Intramuscular Versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus. N Engl J Med. 2012;366:591-600.

Communication
Shamji H, et al. Improving the Quality of Care and Communicaiton During Patient Transitions: Best Practices for Urgent Care Centers. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2014:40;319-24.

 

©2015 Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine

You've called 911 now what

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Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Using a case-based approach, this CME activity will provide practical training on the management of congenital hypothyroidism. The course will address the initial diagnostic testing and initiation of treatment in infancy through childhood and adolescence.

The course will review the clinical signs of hypothyroidism, the initial work up, appropriate dosing and delivery of thyroid hormone replacement, the schedule of lab testing to monitor treatment and how to interpret results. The impact of congenital hypothyroidism on growth and development will be reviewed. Guidance on educating parents and patients to optimize adherence will be provided.

The course modules include short educational videos and role play videos of parent communication at each stage of diagnosis and management. Case-based testing and medication management scenarios provide the opportunity to assess your knowledge and learn from particular examples.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for pediatricians, family practice physicians, and primary care physicians.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: September 4, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.25 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.25
  • AAP Credits Offered: 1.25
  • Registration Fee: FREE

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

TO OBTAIN AAP CREDIT

Only AAP Fellows and Candidate Members may claim AAP credit.

After completing all the necessary steps above and receiving your CME Certificate, visit http://pedialink.aap.org and log in using your AAP username and password.

Once logged in, click the CME tab and then go to the CME transcript page to claim your year-end credit.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Formulate a plan for the confirmatory retesting for congenital hypothyroidism.
  • Prescribe and adjust treatment according to the American Academy of Pediatrics published guidelines (2006).
  • Counsel and educate parents to address questions and concerns about congenital hypothyroidism and emphasize their responsibility in medication adherence.
  • Interpret thyroid function tests.
  • Distinguish which children warrant a trial off thyroid hormone replacement to determine if congenital hypothyroidism was transient.
  • Monitor associated developmental challenges that affect children with congenital hypothyroidism.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Why Screen for Congenital Hypothyroidism?
  3. Initial Diagnosis
  4. Interpreting Results and Starting Treatment
  5. Long Term Care of CH Patients
  6. Course Wrap-up
  7. Resources and References
  8. Help!

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Laura K. Bachrach, MD
Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)
Stanford School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Presenter

Mary Rutherford, MD, FAAP, FACEP
Director of Clinical Quality
UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland
Speaker

Ning Rosenthal, MD, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Genetic Disease Screening Program
California Department of Public Health
Planner

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actors

Julie Pantaleoni, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

Rajiv B. Kumar, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics
Endocrinology and Diabetes

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This continuing medical education activity has been reviewed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and is acceptable for a maximum of1.25 AAP credits. These credits can be applied toward the AAP CME/CPD Award available to Fellows and Candidate Members of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This activity received no commercial support.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

BIBLIOGRAPHY

American Academy of Pediatrics. Update of newborn screening and therapy for congenital hypothyroidism. Pediatrics. 2006; 117: 2290-2303

Leger J et al. European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Consensus guidelines on Screening, diagnosis, and management of congenital hypothyroidism. HormRes Paediatr. 2014; 81: 80-103

congenital hypothyroidism

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Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, October 2, 2015 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Course Description

This CME activity focuses on depression in the primary care setting – the screening, assessment, and referral of depressed patients. Guidance is given for effective referral of depressed patients to psychiatry treatment and interfacing with mental health providers and systems. Learners are engaged by didactic videos with annimations, short modules with role-play demonstrations of patients and physicians, case studies and self-assessments.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for family practice doctors, primary care physicians, internal medicine physicians, OB/GYNs providing primary care, and allied health professionals providing care in primary care settings.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: October 2, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.5 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.50
  • Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the clinical diagnosis of depression and impact of misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis.
  • Recognize identifying signs and symptoms of the range of patient presentation of depression in the primary care setting.
  • Screen patients for depression and suicide risk in a primary care setting.
  • Assess the severity of depression and suicide risk, in the time limits of a primary care visit, using the DSM-5 criteria for depressive disorder.
  • Implement an effective referral process of depressed and/or suicidal patients to psychiatric treatment.
  • Manage long-term treatment for depressed patients through coordinated care with mental health providers and systems.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Overview of Depression in Primary Care Settings
  3. Co-morbidity of Depression and Medical Illness
  4. Screening for and Assessing Depression
  5. Depression and Co-morbidity with Anxiety and Substance Abuse
  6. Mental Health Referrals
  7. Course Wrap-up
  8. Resources and References
  9. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Oxana Palesh, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director of Stanford Cancer Survivorship Research
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director

Cheryl Gore-Felton, PhD
Professor & Associate Chairman of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director

Alan K. Louie, MD
Professor (Teaching) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Laura W. Roberts, MD, MA
Chair & Professor of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Melissa Packer, MA
Project Coordinator
Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Mary Ann Norfleet, PhD
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Stephaine Evans, PhD
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Ellen Hendriksen, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner
Speaker

David Spiegel, MD
Wilson Professor and Associate Chair
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
Speaker

Rex Huang, MD
Chief of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Assistant Chief of the Department of Psychiatry
Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center
Author

Helen Wilson, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
Stanford University School of Medicine
Author

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actors

Derek Yee 
Michael Abts 
Richard Forrell 
Pamela NemecekLance Huntlan 
Valerie Weak 
Rotimi Agbabiaka 
Radhika Rao

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html.

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu.

Bibliography

Culpepper, L. Managing depression in primary care: achieving remission. Primary Care Companion Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2006;8(2):88-97.

Hegarty K, Gunn J, Blashki G, Griffiths F, Dowell T, Kendrick T. How could depression guidelines be made more relevant and applicable to primary care? A quantitative and qualitative review of national guidelines. Br J Gen Pract. 2009;59(562):e149-56.

Luoma JB, Martin CE, Person JL. Contact with mental health and primary care providers before suicide: a review of the evidence. Am J Psychiatry. 2002;159(6):909-916.

Mitchell J, Trangle M, Degnan B, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Adult Depression in Primary Care. 16th Ed, September 2013. See https://www.icsi.org/_asset/fnhdm3/Depr-Interactive0512b.pdf

O'Connor EA, Whitlock EP, Beil TL, Gaynes BN. Screening for depression in adult patients in primary care settings: a systematic evidence review. Ann Intern Med. 2009;151(11):793-803.

Pirkis J, Burgess P. Suicide and recency of health care contacts. A systematic review. Br J Psychiatry. 1998;173:462-474.

Pignone MP, Gaynes BN, Rushton JL, et al. Screening for depression in adults:a summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2002;136(10):765-776.

 

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

SCREENING AND ASSESSING DEPRESSION IN PRIMARY CARE SETTINGS: CLINICAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS

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Access learning material from upcoming, self-study, and completed courses...

Date: 
Friday, October 2, 2015 to Thursday, August 31, 2017
Go to Course
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Course Description

This CME activity is a refresher on relevant functional musculoskeletal anatomy and physical exam techniques of the shoulder. Using case examples as well as didactics, animated visualizations, and video demonstrations, this course is designed to elevate the practicing physician’s confidence in understanding the current evidence base in managing routinely encountered conditions of the shoulder. Specific indications and timing for intervention and practices including various injection techniques are highlighted. In addition to providing a solid foundation in both physical exam and interventional skills, the curriculum is intended to introduce the physician to the role of ultrasound as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in assessing shoulder conditions.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for primary care physicians including family practice and internal medicine physicians, neurologists, rheumatologists, and emergency medicine physicians.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: October 2, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe relevant functional musculoskeletal anatomy and biomechanics as they relate to routinely encountered conditions of the shoulder.
  • Conduct a standardized physical examination to efficiently assess the shoulder and help generate an accurate differential diagnosis.
  • Identify indications for immediate, urgent, or early referral to the appropriate sub-specialist.
  • Formulate appropriate management strategies for various shoulder conditions based on current evidence, including the indications, timing and methods of performing targeted shoulder injections.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1. Introduction to Shoulder Anatomy and Pain
  3. Module 2. Comprehensive Physical Exam of Shoulder
  4. Module 3. Indications for Referrals
  5. Module 4. Conservative Management of Shoulder Pain
  6. Course Wrap-up
  7. Resources and References
  8. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers, authors, and reviewers have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Eugene Yousik Roh, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Speaker

Ninad Karandikar, MD
Assistant Professor (Affiliated) of Orthopedic Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine
Medical Director, Regional Amputation and Transitional Rehabilitation Program
Veterans Administration, Palo Alto Health Care System
Course Director
Author/Speaker

Rebecca Dutton, MD
Chief Resident
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner
Author/Speaker

YT Chen, MD
Sports Medicine Fellow
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner
Reviewer

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberely Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actor

Derek Yee

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu.

Bibliography

Aly AR, Rajasekaran S, Ashworth N. Ultrasound-guided shoulder girdle injections are more accurate and more effective than landmark-guided injections: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med. 2015;49(16):1-42-1049.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Clinical practice guideline on optimizing the management of rotator cuff problems. Rosemont (IL): American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2010.

Comer GC, Liang E, Bishop JA. Lack of proficiency in musculoskeletal medicine among emergency medicine physicians. Journal of Orthop Trauma. 2014; 28(4): e85-e87.

Day CS, Yeh AC, Franko O, Ramirez M, Krupat E. Musculoskeletal medicine: an assessment of the attitudes and knowledge of medical students at Harvard Medical School. Academic Medicine. 2007; 82(5): 452-457.

DiCaprio MR, Covey A, Bernstein J. Curricular requirements for musculoskeletal medicine in American medical schools. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 2003; 85-A(3): 565-567.

Dragoo JL, Braun HJ, Kim HJ, Phan HD, Golish SR. The in vitro chondrotoxicity of single-dose local anesthetics. Am J Sports Med. 2012 Apr;40(4):794-9.

Hermans J, Luime JJ, Meuffels DE, et al. Does this patient with shoulder pain have rotator cuff disease?: the Rational Clinical Examination systematic review. JAMA. 2013;310(8):837-847.

Karandikar O, Ortiz O. Kinetic chains: a review of the concept and its clinical applications. PM&R. 2011; 3(8): 739-745.

Lynch JR, Schmale GA, Schaad DC, Loepold SS. Important demographic variables impact the musculoskeletal knowledge and confidence of academic primary care physicians. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 2006; 88(7): 1589-1595.

Malanga GA, Nadler S. Musculoskeletal Physical Examination: An Evidence-Based Approach. Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences, 2006.

Matheney JM, Brinker MR, Elliott MN, Blake R, Rowane M. Confidence of graduating family practice residents in their management of musculoskeletal conditions. The American Journal of Orthopedics. 2000; 29(12): 945-952.

New Zealand Guidelines Group. The diagnosis and management of soft tissue shoulder injuries and related disorders. Wellington: ACC, July 2004.

Pedowitz RA, Yamaguchi K, Ahmad CS. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Optimizing the management of rotator cuff problems. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2011;19(6):368-79.

Piper SL, Kramer JD, Kim HT, Feeley BT. Effects of local anesthetics on articular cartilage. Am J Sports Med. 2011;39(10):2245-53.

Soh E, Li W, Ong KO, Chen W, Bautista D. Image-guided versus blind corticosteroid injections in adults with shoulder pain: a systematic review. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011 Jun 25;12:137.

Woolf AD, Pfledger B. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions. Bull World Health Organ. 2003; 81(9): 646-656.

 

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine


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Date: 
Monday, December 21, 2015
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Now Open!

Course Description

Genetics and genomics are undergoing an unparalleled revolution. A better understanding of biology and human health can create breakthroughs in disease treatment and introduces the prospect of personalized medicine. This course will begin with an introduction and review of the general principles of genomics and molecular biology. You will then explore in detail the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Learn how scientists sequence, assemble, and analyze the function and structure of genomes. Explore methods for determining the heritability of traits & diseases by studying the larger population, and learn how gene identification can help identify targets for therapeutic intervention. Explore how you could use personal genomics to manage your health.

This course is the required second course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You will learn

  • The principles of genetics, genes and traits
  • The applications and implications of genome sequencing
  • How personal genomics might impact healthcare
  • Tools used to diagnose and treat diseases
  • Methods for determining the heritability of traits and diseases

Instructors

Anne Brunet, Associate Professor of Genetics, Stanford University

Hinco Gierman, Geneticist, Illumina

Julie Granka, Personal Geneticist, Ancestry.com

Jonathon Pritchard, Professor of Genetics and Biology, Stanford University

Gavin Sherlock, Associate Professor of Genetics, Stanford University

Michael Snyder, Professor and Chair of Genetics; Certificate Academic Director, Stanford University

Barry Starr, Director, Outreach Activities; Certificate Program Director, Stanford University

Additional Resources

*This certificate neither substitutes for, nor leads to, being board certified as a genetic counselor (ABGC) or clinical geneticist (ABMG)

Genomics

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Date: 
Monday, December 21, 2015
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Now Open!

Course Description

The field of genetics is rich with discovery. Mapping the human genome, conducting genetic testing, and identifying new vaccines are just a few of the many ways genetics can have a powerful impact on our world. This course provides a stair-step introduction of genetics from the basic concepts to exploring more complex topics, including molecular biology, gene mapping and screening, and reverse and forward genetic research.You will explore both what is known about genes as well as how we use genetics research to better understand basic biology. This course will create the solid foundation needed to be successful in the subsequent courses within the program.

This course is the required first course in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate.

You will learn

  • The structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes
  • How traits get passed down through generations
  • The fundamentals of molecular biology
  • The use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease
  • Existing and emerging model organisms of genetic research

Instructors

Kasia Bryc, Personal Geneticist, 23andMe

William Greenleaf, Assistant Professor of Genetics, Stanford University

Michael Snyder, Professor and Chair in Genetics; Certificate Academic Director, Stanford University

Barry Starr, Director, Outreach Activities; Certificate Program Director, Stanford University

Ruth Tennen, Lecturer, Stanford University

Monte Winslow, Assistant Professor of Genetics, Stanford University

Additional Resources

*This certificate neither substitutes for, nor leads to, being board certified as a genetic counselor (ABGC) or clinical geneticist (ABMG)

Fundamentals of Genetics

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Date: 
Wednesday, November 25, 2015
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Course topic: 

Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

Although dementia is the most common diagnosis in older adulthood it is under-recognized in primary care. This gap in recognition is even greater for patients, their caregivers and families who belong to various ethnic and racial minority populations. As U.S. residents are aging, and becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, physicians and other healthcare providers will increasingly need to tailor their care to specific populations. This series of continuing education activities is designed to help healthcare providers recognize dementia, select culturally appropriate assessment tools, and communicate effectively about dementia care in ethnically and racially diverse populations. This initial course, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment, will introduce primary care physicians and members of their care teams to the “ethnogeriatric imperative” and its impact on dementia. Future courses will provide information on assessing and caring for diverse racial and ethnic groups.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for physicians in primary care, family practice, internal medicine and psychiatry specialties and nurses and social workers who work with older people. 

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: November 25, 2015
  • Expiration Date: November 27, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.5 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.50
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the CME post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Compare the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in racial and ethnic minorities to the general population.
  • Identify the barriers faced by ethnic/racial minorities in obtaining diagnosis and services after onset of dementia.
  • Identify dementia in older adults from diverse race/ethnic backgrounds.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Overview of Dementia and Ethnicity
  3. Diagnostic Guidelines for Neurocognitive Disorders
  4. Overview of Dementia Care for Primary Care Providers
  5. Literature Regarding Ethnic Differences in Dementia Treatment
  6. Dementia Assessment for Primary Care Providers
  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia for Primary Care Providers 
  8. Course Wrap-Up 
  9. Resources and References
  10. Help! 

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Nancy Morioka-Douglas, MD, MPH 
Clinical Professor, General Medicine Disciplines
Stanford University School of Medicine
Medical Director for Patient Centered Care in Primary Care, Stanford Health Care
Co-Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Course Director
Speaker

Dolores Gallagher-Thompson, PhD, ABPP 
Professor of Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Co-Course Director
Speaker

Nusha Askari, PhD  
Program Manager
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Kala Mehta, DSC, MPH
Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco
Program Evaluation Consultant, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Yuan Marian Tzuang, MSW 
Program Coordinator, Stanford Geriatric Education Center 
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Planner

Annecy Majoros, BA
Research Assistant
Department of Psychiatry/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
Program Assistant
Department of Medicine/General Internal Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Planner

Gwen Yeo, PhD, AGSF 
Director Emerita, Stanford Geriatric Education Center
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Speaker

Michael D. Greicius, MD, MPH  
Associate Professor, Department of Neurology & Neurological Science 
Associate Professor (by courtesy), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Speaker

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech 

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Jim Neighbours 
Stanford Center for CME

Jenny Xu
SGEC Instructional Designer

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Bibliography

Braun KL, Takamura JC, Mougeot T. Perceptions of dementia, caregiving and help-seeking among Vietnamese immigrants. J Cross Cult Gerontol. 1996;11(3):213-28.

CALD Dementia Strategic Model. (2008). Australia.

DiGregorio M, Salemink O. Living with the dead: The politics of ritual and remembrance in contemporary Vietnam. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. 2007;38(3):433-440.

Hinton L. Improving care for ethnic minority elderly and their family caregivers across the spectrum of dementia severity. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders. 2002;16(Suppl 2):S50-S55.

Hinton L, Franz C, Yeo G, Levkoff S. Conceptions of dementia in a multi-ethnic sample of family caregivers. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005;53(8):1405-10. 

Hinton L, Levkoff SA, Fox K. Introduction: exploring the relationships among aging, ethnicity, and family dementia caregiving. Cult Med Psychiatry. 1999;23(4):403-13. 

Hinton L, Tran JNU, Tran C, Hinton D. Religious and Spiritual Dimensions of the Vietnamese Dementia Caregiving Experience. Hallym Int J Aging HIJA. 2008;10(2):139-160. 

Phan T, Silove D. An overview of indigenous descriptions of mental phenomena and the range of traditional healing practices amongst the Vietnamese. Transcultural Psychiatry. 1999;36(1):79–94. 

Samton JB, Ferrando SJ, Sanelli P, Karimi S, Raiteri V, and Barnhill, JW. The clock drawing test: diagnostic, functional, and neuroimaging correlates in older medically ill adults. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2005;17(4):533-40. 

Schipper, KM. The Taoist Body. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1993 

Timberlake EM, Cook KO. Social work and the Vietnamese refugee. Social Work. 1984;29(2):108-113. 

Tran JNU, Yeo G. Older Vietnamese Americans. In: Adler RN, Kamel HK, eds. Doorway Thoughts: Cross-cultural Health Care for Older Adults. Boston, MA: Jones & Bartlett, 2004. 

U.S. Census Bureau (2001). The Asian and Pacific Islander Population in the United States: March 2000. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/race/api.html. 

Yeo G, Tran JNU, Hikoyeda N, Hinton L. Conceptions of dementia among Vietnamese American caregivers. Journal of Gerontological Soical Work. 2001;36(1-2):131-52. 

Yeo G, Gallagher-Thompson D. (eds). Ethnicity and the Dementias. New York, NY: Routledge, 2006.

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

CME Dementia and Diversity

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About this Course

Around the world, we find ourselves facing global epidemics of obesity, Type 2 Diabetes and other predominantly diet-related diseases. To address these public health crises, we urgently need to explore innovative strategies for promoting healthful eating. There is strong evidence that global increases in the consumption of heavily processed foods, coupled with cultural shifts away from the preparation of food in the home, have contributed to high rates of preventable, chronic disease. In this course, learners will be given the information and practical skills they need to begin optimizing the way they eat. This course will shift the focus away from reductionist discussions about nutrients and move, instead, towards practical discussions about real food and the environment in which we consume it. By the end of this course, learners should have the tools they need to distinguish between foods that will support their health and those that threaten it. In addition, we will present a compelling rationale for a return to simple home cooking, an integral part of our efforts to live longer, healthier lives.

View the trailer for the course here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7x1aaZ03xU

Subtitles available in English
Instructor(s): 
Maya Adam
Stanford Food and Health

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Date: 
Thursday, January 21, 2016
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged students. We will ask students to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

COURSE STAFF

Course Staff Image #1

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

Course Staff Image #2

Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

 

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

International Women's Health

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Date: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2016
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Course topic: 

WELCOME TO PALLIATIVE CARE ALWAYS.

We are excited to have you join our community of participants interested in improving quality of life for patients and families experiencing serious illness. 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Palliative care can help ease suffering and improve wellbeing in people living with serious illnesses such as cancer.

Palliative Care Always is an online, case-based course for health care practitioners who work in cancer care. We believe that incorporating the principles of palliative care—symptom management, goals of care and effective communication—into clinical practice can improve the quality of life for our patients and their support systems. We also believe palliative medicine can improve quality of life for clinicians. We’ve designed this course to educate you about palliative medicine and how it integrates with oncology, and to help you develop primary palliative care skills. Our hope is that you feel increasingly equipped to support the diverse needs of your patients and your own needs as a healthcare provider.

Palliative Care Always features presentations from a variety of Stanford palliative medicine clinicians as well as video scenes with a fictional patient experiencing colon cancer. The course also includes interactive discussions with other participants to learn from role play and practical experiences.

By the end of the course clinicians will be able to:

  • Describe the scope and role of palliative care as part of a patient and family’s care plan 
  • Describe the components of an interdisciplinary treatment plan for physical, psychosocial, and spiritual care, including screening, assessment and management of patient needs
  • Practice basic symptom and distress management and determine when to involve palliative care specialists for extra support
  • Describe the issues around transitions in care (e.g. survivorship or hospice transition) and key needs for patients and caregivers at these times 
  • Respond to common caregiver needs throughout the care continuum
  • Practice effective communication skills with other healthcare providers, patients, and their families; including responding to emotion, coaching in self-management of symptoms and distress, and discussing goals of care

PREREQUISITES

This course is ideal for nurses, social workers, oncologists, patients and families. No prior experience with palliative medicine or cancer care is necessary.

COURSE STAFF

This course was developed by faculty members in Palliative Medicine at the Stanford Health Care. Your course moderator is Erika Tribett, MPH. 

Course Staff Image #1

Kavitha Ramchandran MD

Kavitha Ramchandran MD, graduated with an undergraduate degree in Human Biology from Stanford University, did medical school and residency training in medicine at University of California, San Francisco and completed her fellowship in Medical Oncology and Palliative Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago. She joined faculty at Stanford University in 2007. Currently she is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Oncology and Division of General Medical Disciplines. 

Contributing faculty include:

  • Ellen Brown, MD - Physician and Medical Director of Pathways Hospice 
  • Kelly Bugos, MA RN ANP-BC - Nurse Practitioner and Manager of the Survivorship program at Stanford Health Care
  • Sandy Chan, LCSW - Social worker and Manager of Outpatient Palliative Care at Stanford Health Care
  • Joshua Fronk, DO - Palliative care physician at Stanford Health Care
  • Lynn Hutton, MSW - Social work fellow at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital
  • Ed Kilbane, MD - Psychiatrist
  • Lori Klein, BCC - Chaplain and Director of Spiritual Care Services at Stanford Health Care
  • Judy Passaglia, RN MS ACHPN - Palliative nurse and Manager of Inpatient Palliative Care at Stanford Health Care
  • Kim Sickler, CNS - Palliative nurse specialist at Stanford Health Care

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course is a series of twelve modules. Each module will introduce you to a specific aspect of palliative medicine—from effective communication and symptom management to addressing goals of care and specific types of distress. You will learn tips and tools to help you screen for palliative needs and offer basic palliative care. 

Module 1: Introduction to Palliative Care

Module 2: Communicating with Families and Patients

Module 3: Psychosocial Support

Module 4: Goals of Care

Module 5: Pain Assessment and Management

Module 6: Nausea and Fatigue Management

Module 7: Survivorship

Module 8: Spiritual Care

Module 9: Psychological Support

Module 10: Child Social Support

Module 11: Hospice Care

Module 12: Reflection

Each module consists of four main sections: 

  • Reading and Reflection - description
  • Scenes with Sarah - description 
  • Lecture - description
  • Interactive Group Discussion - description

OFFICE HOURS

Each week, faculty will post a video that answers your questions and discusses current issues related to the week's topic. Questions may be submitted Wednesday through Sunday, and videos will be posted by Tuesday of the following week.

WEEKLY DISCUSSION SESSIONS

Each module will close with a discussion session with a small group of your peers. The goal is to practice and reflect on the skills you’ve picked up during each module and learn from others in the course. Each discussion will last approximately 45 minutes. The platform we will use for online discussions is called Talkabout. In order to access Talkabout, you will need to make sure your computer is set up to use Google Hangout. Please follow the instructions here to load and join Talkabout.

If you prefer not to use Talkabout, you can complete these discussions in person or in another manner of your choice. In order to receive credit for these discussion sessions, you will need to submit a 100-word response that reflects on your experience. The free response is located in the "Talkabout Discussion" section of each module. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How much time will I spend on this course each week?

It varies, as some of the modules contain more content than others. In general, you should expect to spend between 2 and 3 hours on Palliative Care Always each week. This accounts for light reading, watching videos, answering assessment questions and participating in interactive discussions.

Can I obtain a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes. To receive a "Statement of Accomplishment" for this course (i.e., a passing grade), you must receive a score of at least 75%. 

Are there required assignments?

For those who are interested in a Statement of Accomplishment, grades include completion of Assessment questions throughout all 12 modules (50%), submission of reflection posts on the course discussion forum (25%), and participation in interactive discussion sessions (25%). Of course, you are welcome to do only the components of the course you are interested in, if the grade doesn't matter to you.

Palliative Care

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