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Medicine

Biochips and Medical Imaging

Date: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Now Open! (Fee Applies.)

Overview

Recent cutting-edge, translational research in diagnostics and nano-therapies is having a major influence on how we treat and prevent cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This course covers state-of-the-art and emerging bio-sensors, bio-chips, imaging modalities and nano-therapies studied in the context of human physiology—the nervous system, circulatory system and immune system.

Instructors

  • Shan Wang Professor of Electrical Engineering
  • Adam de la Zerda Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering

Topics Include

  • 3D and 4D body images
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • In-vitro diagnostics
  • In-vivo imaging
  • Ultrasounds
  • X-rays

Prerequisites

None, however, a basic knowledge of electromagnetism, optics, chemistry, thermodynamics, or human biology will be complementary.

Prescription Drug Misuse and Addiction: Compassionate Care for a Complex Problem

Date: 
Friday, October 23, 2015
Course topic: 

Now Open!

Presented by:

The Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Department at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

This CME activity provides a practical approach to the management of prescription drug misuse and addiction, including how to use the clinical interview and CURES (California’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) to identify if a problem exists, and how to intervene once the problem has been identified. Animated didactic videos, interactive slides, and video case scenarios will be used to put these principles into practice with a treatment algorithm. The most compassionate approach to tapering patients down and off the medication they are misusing will also be discussed.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for physicians and all health care providers who interact with patients around the issue of prescription medication, e.g. nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: October 23, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Evaluation Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the current state of the prescription drug misuse problem.
  • Describe the role of the provider in the prescription drug misuse problem.
  • Recognize drug-seeking patterns and strategies used by patients who are misusing prescription medications.
  • Diagnose a prescription drug use problem when it is present.
  • Reduce or avoid using enabling and defensive behaviors which exacerbate the problem in the patient.
  • Describe the implications for treatment and outcomes when prescription drug misuse is recognized as a chronic medical illness.
  • Interpret findings on CURES, California’s prescription drug monitoring program, to identify a prescription drug problem.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Describing the Prescription Drug Epidemic
  3. The Doctor-Patient Relationship
  4. How Doctors Can Help Instead of Harm?
  5. Course Wrap-up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Anna Lembke, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director, Stanford Addiction Medicine Program
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Speaker

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberley Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actor

Pamela Nemecek

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (rn.ca.gov). Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http:/ /lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html.

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Bibliography

Administration SA and MHS. Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-46, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4795. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2013.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (institution). No Title. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/about/terms/glossary.htm#e. Accessed July 30, 2015.

Chen LH, Hedegaard H, Warner M. QuickStats: Rates of deaths from drug poisoning and drug poisoning involving opioid analgesics—United States, 1999–2013. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(01):32.

Crews F, He J, Hodge C. Adolescent cortical development: a critical period of vulnerability for addiction. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2007;86(2):189-199.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 2013.

Drugfree.org. 2012 Partnership Attitude Tracking Study. 2013. http://www.drugfree.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/PATS-2012-FULL-REPORT2.pdf. Accessed December 16, 2013.

George O, Le Moal M, Koob GF. Allostasis and addiction: role of the dopamine and corticotropin-releasing factor systems. Physiol Behav. 2012;106(1):58-64.

Humphreys K. Circles of Recovery: Self-Help Organizations for Addictions. Vol (Edwards G, ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2004.
Kauer JA, Malenka RC. Synaptic plasticity and addiction. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2007;8(11):844-858.
Lembke A. From self-medication to intoxication: time for a paradigm shift. Addiction. 2013;108(4):670-671.
Lembke A. Why doctors prescribe opioids to known opioid abusers. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(5):485.
Manchikanti L. National drug control policy and prescription drug abuse: facts and fallacies. Pain Physician. 2007;10(3):399-424.
Manchikanti L, Singh A. Therapeutic opioids: a ten-year perspective on the complexities and complications of the escalating use, abuse, and nonmedical use of opioids. Pain Physician. 2008;11:S63-S88.
McDonald DC, Carlson K, Izrael D. Geographic variation in opioid prescribing in the U.S. J Pain. 2012;13(10):988-996.
Nestler EJ. Is there a common molecular pathway for addiction? Nat Neurosci. 2005;8(11):1445-1449.
Paulozzi LJ. Prescription drug overdoses: a review. J Safety Res. 2012;43(4):283-289.
Paulozzi LJ, Jones CM, Mack KA, Rudd RA. Vital Signs: Overdoses of Prescription Opioid Pain Relievers --- {United States}, 1999–2008. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011;60(43):1487-1492.
Ries RK, Fiellin DA, Miller SC, Saitz R. Principles of Addiction Medicine, 4th Ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Williams; 2009.
Robison LM, Sclar DA, Skaer TL, Galin RS. National trends in the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the prescribing of methylphenidate among school-age children: 1990-1995. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1999;38(4):209-217.
Schultz W. Potential vulnerabilities of neuronal reward, risk, and decision mechanisms to addictive drugs. Neuron. 2011;69(4):603-617.
Selemon LD. A role for synaptic plasticity in the adolescent development of executive function. Transl Psychiatry. 2013;3:e238.
Steketee JD, Kalivas PW. Drug wanting: behavioral sensitization and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. Pharmacol Rev. 2011;63(2):348-365.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Drug Abuse Warning Network, 2011: National Estimates of Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits. Rockville, MD; 2013.
Sullivan MD, Howe CQ. Opioid therapy for chronic pain in the United States: promises and perils. Pain. 2013;154 Suppl:S94-S100.
Warner M, Chen LH, Makuc DM, Anderson RN MA. Drug poisoning deaths in the United States, 1980–2008. NCHS data brief, no 81 Hyattsville, MD US Dep Heal Hum Serv CDC. 2011.
Weisner CM, Campbell CI, Ray GT, et al. Trends in prescribed opioid therapy for non-cancer pain for individuals with prior substance use disorders. Pain. 2009;145(3):287-293.
Wise RA, Koob GF. The development and maintenance of drug addiction. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2014;39(2):254-262.

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

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  1. Course Number

    008

  2. Classes Start

    Oct 23, 2015

Molecular Foundations of Medicine

Date: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course contains selected topics that will help participants understand applications of molecular biology in medicine. Topics include reading the primary literature, molecular techniques, DNA recombination, and genome expression. The materials consist of short videos linked to questions that help participants evaluate their understanding of the material.

PREREQUISITES

None. Participants should be able to fill gaps in their knowledge by simple web searches.

COURSE STAFF

Gilbert Chu

Gilbert Chu is a Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry at Stanford University. He has taught at Stanford since 1987 and has received several teaching awards from the school of medicine.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

No. 

Are any additional textbooks or software required?

No. Some references to additional material are provided in the videos.

Optimizing Antimicrobial Therapy with Timeouts

Date: 
Monday, November 2, 2015
Course topic: 

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Now Open!

Optimizing Antimicrobial Therapy with Timeouts

Internet Enduring Material Jointly Provided by:

Stanford University School of Medicine (CME) and Tufts University School of Medicine (CPE)

Stanford School of Medicine logo     Tufts School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

The Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

Antibiotic misuse is widespread and has dire patient and public health consequences. National organizations, including the CDC and the Joint Commission, advocate for a formal “Antibiotic Timeout” to reassess empiric antibiotics 48-72 hours after their initiation. During this Timeout, clinicians should answer the following questions:

  • Does the patient have an infection that will respond to antibiotics?
  • If so, is the patient on the right antibiotic(s) and is it being administered in the correct dose and by the correct route and (in the case of intravenous therapy) duration of infusion?
  • Can a more targeted antibiotic regimen be used to treat the infection (i.e., de-escalation)?
  • For how long should the antibiotic(s) be administered?

This CME/CPE activity provides a practical approach to performing “Antibiotic Timeouts” in the inpatient setting. Using short, didactic sessions, we will provide examples on how to reassess antibiotic therapy started empirically using clinical, laboratory, and microbiological data. The majority of this CME/CPE will be high-yield, interactive inpatient cases covering skin and soft tissue infections, pneumonia, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and neutropenic fever, that illustrate the timeout process and the principles of appropriate use of antimicrobials.

Intended Audience

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians from a wide variety of specialties including cardiology, critical care, family practice, general surgery, hospitalists, infectious diseases, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, pediatrics, and urology, as well as pharmacists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: November 2, 2015
  • Expiration Date: November 2, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME/CPE Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE
  • There is a $15 fee for pharmacists to obtain ACPE credit.

To Obtain CME Credits or Certificate of Participation

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the Post-test, Evaluation Survey, and Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

To Obtain CPE Credits

  • Register and view all the course content.
  • Receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test, you will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Complete the Evaluation Survey, which includes providing your name, email address, and NABP e-Profile ID to Stanford
  • Attest to the Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity

After successfully attesting your completion of the activity, a link to pay for CPE credit at the TUSM OCE online store will be avilable on the Activity Completion Statement page.

All pharmacists licensed in the United States and wishing to obtain ACPE credit are required to submit to TUSM OCE; a NABP e-Profile ID and the month/day of birth in a four-digit format, e.g., January 5 = 0105. Contact hours will be issued through a NABP-managed online tracking system called CPE Monitor.

The above data and $15 fee will be required at the TUSM OCE online store for processing.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the principles and shortcomings of empiric antibiotic therapy.
  • Routinely conduct all steps of the antibiotic timeout, in accordance with CDC guidelines on antibiotic stewardship that include:
    • Analyzing laboratory and clinical data
    • Formulating a rationale for continued antibiotic use
    • Documenting rationale in patient’s electronic medical record
    • Determining the most effective duration of antibiotic therapy
    • Deciding when it is appropriate to switch from an IV to oral route of antibiotic administration

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy
  3. Antibiotic Timeout Cases
  4. Course Wrap-up
  5. Resources and References
  6. Help!

Disclosures of Relevant Financial Relationships with Commercial Interests

All faculty, course directors, planning committee members and others in a position to control the content of an educational activity are required to disclose to the audience any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. Conflicts of interest resulting from a relevant financial relationship are resolved prior to activity release.

The following planner indicated having relevant relationships with industry to disclose:

Stan Deresinski, MD, FIDSA
Clinical Professor of Infectious Disease
Director Stanford Antimicrobial Safety and Sustainability Program
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Bayer & Cubist Pharmaceuticals - Advisory Board Member

The following planners, speakers, authors, and reviewers have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Stan Deresinski, MD, FIDSA
Clinical Professor of Infectious Disease
Director Stanford Antimicrobial Safety and Sustainability Program
Stanford University School of Medicine
Speaker/Author

Marisa Holubar, MD, MS
Clinical Assistant Professor in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease and Geographic Medicine
Associate Director Stanford Antimicrobial Safety and Sustainability Program
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director
Speaker/Author

Elizabeth Robilotti, MD, MPH
Assistant Attending, Infectious Diseases
Associate Director, Infection Control
Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases,
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
Course Director
Reviewer

Emily Mui, PharmD, BCPS
Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist
Stanford Hospital and Clinics
Planner

Lina Meng, PharmD, BCPS
Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist
Stanford Hospital and Clinics
Planner

Arjun Srinivasan, MD (CAPT, USPHS)
Associate Director for Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention Programs
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Speaker

Kirthana R. Beaulac, PharmD, BCPS
Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
Reviewer

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Hardware/Software Requirements

Minimum Hardware Requirements: WINDOWS: Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo, RAM: 2 GB, Operating System: Vista, Windows 7, 8, or better. MAC: Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo, RAM: 2 GB, Operating System: 10.7 or better.

Minimum Software Requirements: Web Browser: Chrome (v40.0 or higher) or Safari (v5.0.6 or higher) with Javascript enabled. If you don't have it, you will need a current version of Adobe Flash Player, which can be downloaded here: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

Minimum Internet: LAN, Cable, or DSL connection is highly recommended, Cellular (4G/LTE) may also be used.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Pharmacists

Tufts University School of Medicine Office of Continuing Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

This activity is available for 2.00 contact hours, Universal Activity Number: 0054-9999-15-007-H01-P

Type of continuing pharmacy education: application-based

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME/CPE activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html.

TUSM OCE Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality

Click here to review the TUSM OCE Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality

SCCME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Request to the OpenEdX Team.

If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu.

For question regarding ACPE certification, please contact Tufts University School of Medicine - Office of Continuing Education at med-oce@tufts.edu or 617-636-6579.

Bibliography

Deresinski S. Principles of antibiotic therapy in severe infections: optimizing the therapeutic approach by use of laboratory and clinical data. 2007;45 Suppl 3:S177-83. PMID: 17712744

Oxman DA, Adams CD, Deluke G, et al. Improving antibiotic de-escalation in suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia: an observational study with a pharmacist-driven intervention. J Pharm Pract. 2015;28(5):457-61. PMID: 24651641

Duchene E, Montassier E, Boutoille D, et al. Why is antimicrobial de-escalation under-prescribed for urinary tract infections? Infection. 2013;41(1):211-4. PMID: 23124907

American Thoracic Society; Infectious Diseases Society of America. Guidelines for the management of adults with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated, and healthcare-associated pneumonia. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005; 171(4):388-416. PMID: 15699079

Freifeld AG, Bow EJ, Sepkowitz KA, et al, Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clinical practice guideline for the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer: 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2011;52(4):e56-93. PMID: 21258094

Hooton TM, Bradley SF, Cardenas DD, et al.; Infectious Diseases Society of America. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in adults: 2009 International Clinical Practice Guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50(5):625-63. PMID: 20175247

Mandell LA, Wunderink RG, Anzueto A, et al.; Infectious Diseases Society of America; American Thoracic Society. Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society consensus guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Clin Infect Dis. 2007;44 (Suppl 2):S27-72. PMID: 17278083

Stevens DL, Bisno AL, Chambers HF, et al, Infectious Diseases Society of America. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections: 2014 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2014; 59(2):e10-52. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu444. Erratum in: Clin Infect Dis. 2015; 60(9):1448. Dosage error in article text. PMID: 24973422

For a complete listing see the Resources and References module in the course.

©2015 Stanford University School of Medicine

CME Optimizing Time Outs

Inflammation and Disease

Date: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 to Friday, October 23, 2015
Course topic: 

This course is offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Inflammation is a double-edged sword. It is required to protect the body, but too much of it can create disease. Diabetes, cancer, depression, and stroke are just a few of the diseases associated with chronic inflammation. How can something that protects us from infection and helps us to repair and restore the body also be so bad for us? 

Chronic inflammation is associated with lifestyle factors like obesity, diet, exercise, sleep habits, and stress levels. However, the root cause can be attributed to the impact of these factors at a cellular and a molecular level. An intimate and complex network of communication is constantly taking place in our bodies, and our immune system is at the center of this network. Signals about what we eat, how much we weigh, and how much we exercise are all communicated through our immune system and impact our levels of inflammation. In this online course, we will take a closer look at how our lifestyle choices affect our health through inflammation and investigate the cellular events orchestrating our healthy and unhealthy states.

The Upside of Stress

Date: 
Monday, September 28, 2015 to Friday, November 6, 2015

Offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Fee Applies.

What if everything you thought you knew about stress was wrong? And what if changing your mind about stress could make you happier, healthier, and better able to reach your goals? In this online course, taught by health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, students will learn about new research showing that under certain circumstances stress can be good for us, and rather than trying to escape it, embracing stress and capitalizing on its hidden benefits may be the key to improving our well-being.

Writing in the Sciences

Date: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 to Friday, November 6, 2015
Course topic: 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, and issues in publication and peer review. Students from non-science disciplines can benefit from the training provided in the first four weeks (on general principles of effective writing).

COURSE FORMAT

In the first four weeks, we will review principles of effective writing, examples of good and bad writing, and tips for making the writing process easier. In the second four weeks, we will examine issues specific to scientific writing, including: authorship, peer review, the format of an original manuscript, and communicating science for lay audiences. Students will watch video lectures, complete quizzes and editing exercises, write two short papers, and edit each others’ work.

COURSE SYLLABUS

Week 1 - Introduction; principles of effective writing (cutting unnecessary clutter)

Week 2 - Principles of effective writing (verbs)

Week 3 - Crafting better sentences and paragraphs

Week 4 - Organization; and streamlining the writing process

Week 5 - The format of an original manuscript

Week 6 - Reviews, commentaries, and opinion pieces; and the publication process

Week 7 - Issues in scientific writing (plagiarism, authorship, ghostwriting, reproducible research)

Week 8 - How to do a peer review; and how to communicate with the lay public

PREREQUISITES

The course has no prerequisites other than fluency in English.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

Yes, students who score at least 60 percent will pass the course and receive a Statement of Accomplishment. 

Students who score at least 90 percent will receive a Statement of Accomplishment with distinction.

How much of a time commitment will this course be?

You should expect this course to require 4 to 8 hours of work per week.

Any additional textbooks/software required?

There is no textbook for this course. Students who would like additional reading may enjoy:

- On Writing Well, William Zinsser

- The Elements of Style, Strunk and White

- Sin and Syntax, Constance Hale

- Essentials of Writing Biomedical Research Papers, Mimi Zeiger

- http://www.aacc.org/publications/clin_chem/ccgsw/Pages/default.aspx

- Science and Society: An Anthology for Readers and Writers, eds: Nelson-McDermott, LePan, Buzzard

- We recommend taking this course on a standard computer using Google Chrome as the internet browser. We are not yet optimized for mobile devices.

International Women's Health & Human Rights

Date: 
Thursday, July 30, 2015 to Wednesday, September 30, 2015

ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged students. We will ask students to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask students to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth.

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry. Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. Please note that online courses do not include university credit.

Course Staff

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

Kevin Hsu

Kevin runs a design studio, Skyship Educational Design, developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including “Democratic Development” featuring Prof. Larry Diamond. He also co-teaches the International Urbanization Seminar with the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University.

International Women's Health Course Feature

Statistics in Medicine

Date: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 to Wednesday, September 2, 2015
Course topic: 

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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics. Specific topics include:

1. Describing data (types of data, data visualization, descriptive statistics)
2. Statistical inference (probability, probability distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, pitfalls of p-values)
3. Specific statistical tests (ttest, ANOVA, linear correlation, non-parametric tests, relative risks, Chi-square test, exact tests, linear regression, logistic regression, survival analysis; how to choose the right statistical test)

The course focuses on real examples from the medical literature and popular press. Each week starts with "teasers," such as: Should I be worried about lead in lipstick? Should I play the lottery when the jackpot reaches half-a-billion dollars? Does eating red meat increase my risk of being in a traffic accident? We will work our way back from the news coverage to the original study and then to the underlying data. In the process, participants will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical studies.

The course also prepares participants to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test and how to avoid common statistical pitfalls. Optional modules cover advanced math topics and basic data analysis in R.

COURSE SYLLABUS

Week 1 - Descriptive statistics and looking at data
Week 2 - Review of study designs; measures of disease risk and association
Week 3 - Probability, Bayes' Rule, Diagnostic Testing
Week 4 - Probability distributions
Week 5 - Statistical inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing)
Week 6 - P-value pitfalls; types I and type II error; statistical power; overview of statistical tests
Week 7 - Tests for comparing groups (unadjusted); introduction to survival analysis
Week 8 - Regression analysis; linear correlation and regression
Week 9 - Logistic regression and Cox regression

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Participants will need to be familiar with a few basic math tools: summation sign, factorial, natural log, exponential, and the equation of a line; a brief tutorial is available on the course website for participants who need a refresher on these topics, and can also be found here.

COURSE STAFF

Kristin Sainani

Kristin Sainani (née Cobb) is an associate professor at Stanford University. She has taught statistics and writing at Stanford for more than a decade and has received several Excellence in Teaching Awards from the graduate program in epidemiology. She received her MS in statistics and her PhD in epidemiology from Stanford University; she also received a certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Dr. Sainani specializes in teaching and writing about science and statistics. She is the statistical editor for the journal Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation; and she writes a statistics column, Statistically Speaking, for this journal. She also authors the health column Body News for Allure magazine; and she writes about health and science for a variety of other publications. In addition to this MOOC, she has taught the MOOC "Writing in the Sciences" on Coursera and Stanford Online.

Joshua Wallach (TA)

Joshua Wallach graduated with a Bachelors degree in Economics from the University of California, Davis in 2012. As a current PhD student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, he is interested in evaluating statistical and epidemiological methods, identifying and minimizing biases, and promoting reproducibility of research. Joshua is passionate about the interdisciplinary nature of epidemiology and meta-research and enjoys working as a Teaching Assistant. When not busy pursuing an academic career, Joshua loves living in Oakland and enjoys hiking, playing guitar, and working out.

Michael McAuliffe (Instructional Technologist)

Mike McAuliffe is an Instructional Technologist in EdTech, IRT for the Stanford University School of Medicine. He supports a wide range of educational technology operations, projects, and initiatives in support of teaching, learning, and research.

Mike joined the School of Medicine in August 2012 and dedicates the majority of his time to the Stanford Medicine Interactive Learning Initiative (SMILI). In this role, Mike collaborates with SoM faculty to design and produce video content for online/hybrid courses delivered to undergraduate medical education, online courses for continuing medical education, online materials for residents and fellows, and MOOCs. Mike also provides instructional design, graphic design, and project planning support to faculty.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

Yes, participants who score at least 60 percent will pass the course and receive a Statement of Accomplishment. 
Participants who score at least 90 percent will receive a Statement of Accomplishment with distinction.

How much of a time commitment will this course be?

You should expect this course to require 8 to 12 hours of work per week.

Any additional textbooks/software required?

No, readings are optional; and the use of the R statistical package is optional.

Can I get CME credit for this course?

This free version of the course does not offer CME credits, but there is a fee-based CME version available as well. Go to the Stanford online CME course page for more information. You are welcome to take this free version of the course before the CME course, but note that you will still need to create an account on the CME site, pay the registration fee, and complete the CME Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation Survey, and Activity Completion Attestation statement in order to receive your credits.

Statistics in Medicine Course Image

Writing In Science (CME)

Date: 
Friday, May 1, 2015 to Monday, April 30, 2018
Course topic: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Many physicians and medical researchers have not had a formal training in scientific writing and have not had mentors in their professional setting to assist them with improving this skill. Scientific writing is an important skill enabling effective disseminating of medical knowledge, clear communication and obtaining grant funding. This course seeks to improve skills in scientific writing as it applies to publishing clear and effective scientific papers and reviewing clinical research.

This course was repurposed from the original MOOC titled Writing in the Sciences that was given over several weeks. This course is self-paced and provides all material at the same time.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of an international audience of physicians, residents and medical researchers in all specialties. 

TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity
  • Complete the CME post-test, CME assessment survey, and attestation question at the end of the activity
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the 30-question post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

 

* Participation in the discussion forum and content marked optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Develop skills to write clear and interesting research papers that demonstrate the ability to: develop the abstract, introduction, content including methods and the results using good style and grace.
  • Develop strategies to apply principles of effective writing as it pertains to reviewing and publishing peer review papers.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 1, 2015
    Expiration Date: April 30, 2018
    Estimated Time to Complete: 20 Hours
    CME Credits Offered: 20.00
    Registration Fee: $20

DISCLOSURES

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Charles Prober, MD
Senior Associate Dean, Medical Education
Stanford School of Medicine
Course Director

Kristin Sainani, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Health Research and Policy
Co-Course Director
Author/Presenter

The following presenters have no relationships with industry relative to the content of this activity:

Eran Bendavid, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Stanford University

Kit Delgado, MD
Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Stanford University

Bradley Efron, MD
Professor of Statistics and of Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

Gary Friedman, MD
Consulting Professor in Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

George Lundberg, MD
Consulting Professor in Health Research and Policy
Stanford University

Crystal Smith-Spangler, MD
Instructor of Medicine,
Stanford University

 

TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Mike McAuliffe 
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox, or Safari browser. You must have JavaScript enabled.

ACCREDITATION AND DESIGNATION OF CREDITS

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 20.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY BILL 1195 – CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC COMPETENCY

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

CME PRIVACY POLICY

Writing in the Sciences

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