Identity & Citizenship

GSE-XCSET0020

Stanford Graduate School of Education


Identity & Citizenship

Description

In a joint decision between Stanford Global Studies and the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching, all institutes during the 2020-2021 academic year will be offered virtually.This shift, which ensures the safety of our scholars, staff, and participants, also affords participants two exciting opportunities: to engage with nationally and internationally renowned scholars and to participate in high quality distance learning with all program design decisions intended to model what also can be done with students. 

Please note that with our move to the virtual space we have changed our typical institute structure from three full days of synchronous learning to three half days, moving the extra learning to asynchronous assignments. In this way we will still be able to provide a rich arc of learning as well as two continuing education units while minimizing Zoom fatigue. We have built all assignments with specific intention knowing that they will serve as meaningful onramps to and between the real-time learning sessions.

Course Details

Where does the idea of citizenship come from? And what does it mean to be a "good" citizen? How are identities wrapped up in citizenship status? What are the paths to citizenship as both an identity and a legal status? Who decides who’s in and who’s out? How do multiple identities fit in with a concept of citizenship? When citizenship becomes a reigning identity category, how have governments and peoples conceptualized stateless individuals who claim citizenship to nowhere? This workshop will explore citizenship as a legal category, an identity marker, and a product of history. It will also examine how citizenship can be both a privilege and a burden.

Pedagogical Focus: Using and Collecting Oral Histories

In this workshop, participants will learn how to infuse alternative artifacts and oral histories into their classrooms. These methods empower students to participate in the preservation of history while also allowing them a greater understanding of whose history “counts.”

What you will learn

  • To deepen your content knowledge of significant historical issues in different national, regional and global contexts. 
  • To apply your new content knowledge as you learn how to infuse alternative artifacts and oral histories while developing a greater understanding of whose history “counts.”
Course Outline

$199

This course is part of the Global Issues, Local Impacts 2020-2021 series. It contains three courses: Identity and Citizenship (November 6-8, 2020), Rising Up: Movements for Change (February 5-7, 2021), and The Resurgence of Great Power Politics (April 16-18, 2021). Registration is available for individual courses ($199 each) and for the 3-course series ($500 for all 3). The $500 series price is only available until registration closes for Identity and Citizenship, October 30, 2020.

001 Autumn 2020-21 Online

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Fees:
At Stanford $199.00
Notes:

Please note that with our move to the virtual space we have changed our typical institute structure from three full days of synchronous learning to three half days, moving the extra learning to asynchronous assignments. Scheduling specifics will be made available as the course dates approach.

This course may not currently be available to learners in some states and territories.