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Medicine & Health

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Medicine
Date: 
Friday, December 15, 2017 to Saturday, May 23, 2020
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Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Office of Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This CME activity provides education on unconscious bias in the academic medicine workplace. Existing research on unconscious bias will provide a science-based view of this seemingly non-science topic. Case studies with examples of unconscious bias, self-assessment opportunities, and exploring bias busting strategies will enable learners to understand how to bring the content into their own unique environments.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians from all specialties as well as other Health Care Professionals.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: May 23, 2017
  • Expiration Date: May 23, 2020
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1.00 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.
  • * Participation in content marked Optional is not certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the effects of unconscious bias in everyday interactions with patients, students, colleagues, and team members.
  • Apply specific “bias-busting” techniques that can be used in the medical and academic environment.
  • Identify where personal unconscious biases may reside across gender, race/ethnicity, and/or cultural attributes in the workplace.
  • Develop strategies to correct personal unconscious biases in daily interactions.

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Date: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
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Course Description

Every healthcare provider responding to a disaster should have foundational knowledge of disaster medicine. This self-paced course will help you explore the foundation for SEMPER disaster knowledge using videos lectures and case scenarios, which will be supplemented by in-person lectures as well as field exercises. This course was developed through SEMPER, Stanford Emergency Medicine Program for Emergency Response.

SEMPER’s mission has 3 pillars:

1. Develop nimble medical teams that could “load and go” into a disaster scene within 24 hours of a call and to be self-sufficient for the first 72 hours.

2. Develop a standardized disaster medicine education curriculum and training for all members.

3. Pursue research to develop disaster best practices in order to improve disaster medical care.


While all SEMPER members are required to complete this course, non-SEMPER members interested in learning more about disaster medicine or any person wishing to deploy to a disaster are also welcome to complete this course. There will be a pre-test as well as a post-test upon completion of all the modules 

You will learn:

• Foundation for SEMPER

• Develop best practices for disaster relief

• Pursue research in disaster medicine


Prerequisite(s): None.


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Date: 
Friday, August 25, 2017 to Friday, October 16, 2020
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Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Although dementia is the most common diagnosis in older adulthood it is under-recognized in primary care. This gap in recognition is even greater for patients, their caregivers and families who belong to various ethnic and racial minority populations. As U.S. residents are aging, and becoming more racially and ethnically diverse, physicians and other healthcare providers will increasingly need to tailor their care to specific populations.

This series of continuing education activities is designed to help healthcare providers recognize dementia, select culturally appropriate assessment tools, and communicate effectively about dementia care in ethnically and racially diverse populations. This course, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: South Asian American Populations, will provide information on assessing and caring for Dementia patients, their families, and caregivers in South Asian American Populations.

The initial course in the series, Dementia and Diversity in Primary Care: A Primer - Guidelines, Ethnic Differences, and Assessment, should be taken prior to other courses in the series as it addresses the diagnosis and treatment of Dementia, while this course addresses best practices, cultural information, and appropriate assessment tools for South Asian American populations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is designed for physicians in primary care, family practice, internal medicine and psychiatry specialties and nurses and social workers who work with older people.

DATES, DURATION AND FEE

  • Release Date: August 25, 2017
  • Expiration Date: August 25, 2020
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 1 Hour
  • CME Credits Offered: 1.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Select culturally appropriate dementia assessment tools for South Asian American patients.
  • Utilize strategies to communicate effectively about dementia care with the families of patients with dementia from South Asian American backgrounds.

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Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017
Course topic: 
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course is designed for anyone over the age of 18 who is interested in learning, developing and maintaining healthy eating, exercise, and sleep habits. The primary objective of this program is to educate students on healthy eating, fitness, and body image and encourage them to apply the information learned to their own lives. Our aim is to provide students with evidence-based, accessible and affordable tools that can guide them on how to maintain a healthy, happy and mindful life in the long-term. Each module contains weekly goal check-ins, self-monitoring logs that track the user’s eating, exercise and sleep habits, psycho-educational reading material about a particular topic (e.g., exercise, nutritional foods, the relationship between the media and food, etc), relevant video(s) and pictures, and goal-setting exercises in which users are asked to design their exercise and fitness goals around the framework of the given module. This course is designed to be fully online and accessible from any location. Finally, this course is intended to be self-directed and to be utilized at the user’s own pace, however we suggest completing 1 session per week. Please note that this program is not considered to be a weight loss program. Rather, it has been designed with the intention of being offered as a weight maintenance program aimed at teaching students how to develop healthy, long-term lifestyle changes.

PREREQUISITES

No prerequisites are necessary for this course. All individuals who are over the age of 18 are welcome to join this program.

COURSE STAFF

Dr. Craig Barr Taylor, Stanford University

Dr. Barr Taylor is a Professor of Psychiatry, Emeritus, through the Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, the Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Behavioral Medicine and was formerly the Director of the Stanford Psychiatry Residency Training Program for 15 years. Dr. Taylor has a secondary appointment at Palo Alto University as a research faculty member and is the Creator and Co-Director of the Center for m2Health. Throughout the span of his extensive career, Dr. Taylor has been awarded a countless number of grants from the National Institue of Health (NIH), has collaborated with the top researchers in the clinical field across the globe, has become an expert on the etiology, maintenance and treatment of anxiety disorders, PTSD, eating disorders, major depressive disorder, cardiovascular disease, smoking cessation, and more, and has authored over hundreds of articles relating to these disorders. In the last two decades, Dr. Taylor has become well regarded as a pioneer in the field of mobile mental health technology for his work on developing and implementing technologically-enhanced interventions. He is committed to providing affordable, accessible, tailored and evidence-based treatment to individuals in need, especially those who are particularly vulnerable to the aforementioned disorders, such as college students. In recognition of his work, Dr. Taylor was elected to The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters in 2002 and was recently awarded the Lori Irving Award of Excellence in Prevention by the National Eating Disorders Association for his groundbreaking research on identifying and treating risk factors for women suffering from eating disorders. Given their combined expertise on eating disorder and obesity prevention, Dr. Taylor co-developed the StayingFit program with Dr. Denise Wilfley at Washington University in St. Louis with the hope that students worldwide could benefit from the health and fitness tips that are offered in the program. 

 

Dr. Denise Wilfley, Washington University in St. Louis

Dr. Wilfley is the Scott Rudolph University Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics, and Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Director of the Weight Management and Eating Disorders Program at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Over the past two decades, she has been awarded more than $25 million from the NIH in a programmatic line of research examining the causes, characterization, prevention, and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. She has extensive experience in developing efficacious interventions to treat and prevent obesity and excess weight gain among children and adults. She also has extensive experience as the lead investigator on numerous clinical trials, and much of this work has focused on identifying and intervening with groups at high risk for obesity and eating disorders. This has allowed for the honing of resources to most effectively prevent progression of negative health outcomes such as Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and metabolic syndromes. In addition to her research, Dr. Wilfley has an illustrious history of serving in leadership roles in advocacy and research societies for obesity and eating disorders. She has long been an external advisor for obesity programs and centers across the country, such as Wellspring Healthy Living Academy, Minnesota Obesity Center, and University of Alabama-Birmingham’s Nutrition Obesity Research Center. She has also been a long-standing member of the Eating Disorders Research Society (EDRS), is a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders and a member of the National Eating Disorders Association Research Advisory Council.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is this course meant to provide medical advice?

No, this course is meant to be educational and is not meant to serve in place of treatment. Should you have any further questions or concerns about receiving treatment, please refer to our resources page for referral information. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this course.

Is a textbook required for this course?

No, you will not need a textbook for this course. All necessary materials are included in the weekly sessions or attached as a PDF.

Are any of the assignments graded for this course?

No, none of the assignments will be graded. This was purposeful as we really wanted users to be able to learn the material without feeling any addded pressure! Please note that this means that you cannot earn a Statement of Accomplishment at the end of this course.

Is there a discussion board in this course?

No, there is no discussion board. If you have any questions concerning the content of the program, please contact our course team members by emailing us at stayingfit.lagunita@gmail.com. Thanks!

Who should I contact if I have any questions about the course?

All questions concerning the content of the StayingFit program can be directed to the course team at stayingfit.lagunita@gmail.com. For all other technical questions about the course, please feel free to send the Stanford Online course support team a message by clicking on the Help tab that displays on all https://lagunita.stanford.edu pages.

Is there a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

At this time, there is no Statement of Accomplishment for this course.


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Date: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 to Tuesday, March 6, 2018
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Course Overview

“I learned early on that sports is a part of life, that it is human life in microcosm, and that the virtues and flaws of the society exist in sports even as they exist everywhere else.”- Howard Cosell

Athletic competitions are prominent in the modern American university. The evolution of collegiate athletics relies on many factors, including gender perceptions, payment issues, and its intersection with American college life. With this course, you will gain a deeper understanding of the important and complex role athletic tradition plays in American higher education.

You will explore how athletic competition has changed over time and learn about the growth and development of sports in American college life. This course takes a deep dive into attitudes about the value of the athlete and competitive sport in our society, debates about amateur vs. professional, athletic training, issues of class and gender in sports, and the aesthetics of the athletic body.

You will learn:

  • Attitudes surrounding competitive sports in modern day college life
  • Issues of class, race, and gender in sports
  • Economics involved with athletic competition

Prerequisite(s): None
Registration Fee: Free


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Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017
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About this course

This course introduces learners to a variety of infectious diseases using a patient-centered, story-based approach. Through illustrated, short videos, learners will follow the course of each patient’s illness, from initial presentation to resolution. Integrating the relevant microbiology, pathophysiology and immunology, this course aims to engage and entice the learner towards future studies in microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases.

The patient-centered videos included in this course were created as part of the Re-imagining Medical Education initiative, led by Charles Prober MD, Senior Associate Dean of Medical Education at the Stanford School of Medicine. This initiative was the first of its kind to explore the collaborative creation of foundational medical education online content by inter-institutional teams of faculty. The content presented in this course was created by faculty from Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with The University of Washington School of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, UCSF School of Medicine, and The University of Michigan Medical School. Support for this initiative was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Burke Family Foundation.

PLEASE NOTE

Information provided in this course is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be used for diagnostic and/or treatment purposes.

Who is this class for: This course is primarily aimed at anyone with an interest in human health.
Created by: Stanford University

Enrollment: Free and fee options

Instructor(s): 
Maya Adam

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Date: 
Monday, June 12, 2017
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ABOUT THIS COURSE

This course provides an overview of women's health and human rights, beginning in infancy and childhood, then moving through adolescence, reproductive years and aging. We consider economic, social, political and human rights factors, and the challenges women face in maintaining health and managing their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles.

We focus on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women's work, sex trafficking, and aging.

Our MOOC will have a special focus on creating an international network of engaged participants. We will ask participants to take part in interactive discussions and cooperative exercises and to share their own experiences. We also ask participants to engage with the communities they live in, in order to deepen their understanding of the issues and tie academic ideas to real-life circumstances.

To find out more details about this course and its principles, please visit our Project Page at www.internationalwomenshealth.org

Our Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/internationalwomenshealth
Twitter: https://twitter.com/intwomenshealth, #intlwomenshealth #iwhhr
Tumblr: http://intlwomenshealth.tumblr.com/

FAQs

What basic principles form the foundation course?

Because we believe that what we do is important but that the way we do it is more important, we attempt to teach and learn according to a set of principles that will guide the content and processes of the course. These are: compassion, mutual learning, respect, transparency, trust, and truth. 

What do I need to take this course?

An interest in health and social justice. It will be useful to have an open mind, willingness to hear different points of view, and a commitment to positive social change. 

Access to the Internet. A stable internet connection will also be useful, as much of the other content, including video interviews and lectures will be delivered online.

The course already started! Is it too late to join?

No you don't have to worry.Because it is an online class, you can comfortably jump into this course the first couple weeks while it is running. You get to review the material and watch video lectures and interviews on your own time! However, you'll want to get up to speed so you can interact with the other students in this international online community.

Is there a textbook for the class?

The primary text for the class is a book on international health and human rights, From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It (Second Edition), by Anne Firth Murray. If you are interested in having a copy of the book, you can obtain one from Amazon.com. We will also make individual chapters available online during the course.

Can I receive a Statement of Accomplishment for this course?

Yes, participants who successfully complete the required elements of the course will receive a personalized Statement of Accomplishment. The Statement of Accomplishment does not confer a Stanford University grade, course credit or degree.

PLEASE NOTE: The content of this course is intended to promote contemplation and discussion of global health issues. Certain issues may be controversial in some cultures and/or disturbing to some people. As such, participants must be aware that some content may be objectionable or uncomfortable to view/read/access. If you feel you might be offended by the content of this course, you should not continue. You access this material at your own risk and are solely responsible for compliance with the laws applicable to your country of residence.

COURSE STAFF

Anne Firth Murray

Anne Firth Murray, a New Zealander, was educated at the University of California and New York University in economics, political science and public administration, with a focus on international health policy and women’s reproductive health.

For the past twenty-five years, Anne has worked in the field of philanthropy, serving as a consultant to many foundations. From 1978-1987, she directed the environment and international population programs at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in California. She is the Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which aims to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women’s well-being and human rights. In 2005, Anne was nominated along with a thousand activist women for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anne is a Consulting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, where she teaches on women's health, human rights and love as a force for social justice. She is the author of the books Paradigm Found: Leading and Managing for Positive Change and From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They Are Doing About It, on international women's health.

 

Kevin Hsu

Kevin heads an educational design studio, Skyship Design, which specializes in developing open online courses (MOOCs) and deploying digital tools in the classroom. He is dedicated to crafting new experiences for students and developed some of Stanford’s earliest social science MOOCs for a global audience, including "Democratic Development" featuring Professor Larry Diamond.

Kevin also teaches in the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, where he is an instructor for International Urbanization, which explores the sustainable development of cities, and Civic Dreams, Human Spaces, a Stanfordd.school (design school) class focused on creating vibrant, inclusive public spaces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Women's Health and Human Rights

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Date: 
Tuesday, May 2, 2017
Course topic: 

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by:

Stanford University School of Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine logo

Presented by:

Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

This CME activity will present a practical approach to several high-risk emergency conditions that can present to office-based practices. The course instructors will describe the immediate recognition and management of these complex patients through a discussion of specific video case-based scenarios and a review of current, evidence-based practice interspersed with interactive self assessments. By learning and applying these high-yield principles, course participants will be able to optimize patient outcomes.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for family physicians, primary care physicians, general surgeons, oncologists, and psychiatrists.

Dates, Duration & Fee

  • Release Date: September 4, 2015
  • Expiration Date: August 31, 2017
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Please review all of the information on this page before clicking the Courseware tab at the top of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Administer high quality CPR in the first moments of recognizing a patient in cardiac arrest.
  • Identify and effectively manage patients with anaphylaxis.
  • Effectively manage patients presenting with severe asthma prior to transfer to the emergency department.
  • Appropriately risk-stratify acute chest pain patients to reduce misdiagnosis and delays in evaluation and treatment.
  • Identify and effectively manage patients in status epilepticus.
  • Conduct rapid, bedside evaluations to evaluate and differentiate patients with low, moderate, and high risk syncope presentations.
  • Conduct a clinical office space assessment of the essential equipment and operational improvements necessary for managing emergencies.
  • Effectively communicate with EMS and Emergency Physicians while managing emergencies.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Basic Life Support
  3. Anaphylaxis
  4. Asthma
  5. Chest Pain
  6. Seizure
  7. Syncope
  8. Office Emergencies
  9. Effective Communication
  10. Course Wrap-up
  11. Resources and References
  12. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners, speakers and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Swaminatha Mahadevan, MD
Associate Professor of Surgery, Emergency Medicine
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Presenter

Matthew Strehlow, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery, Emergency Medicine
Stanford Univeristy School of Medicine
Course Director
Author/Presenter

Technical Design and Development

Mike McAuliffe
Stanford EdTech

Kimberly Walker, PhD
Stanford EdTech

Greg Bruhns
Stanford Online

Role Play Actors

Derek Yee
Heather Kellogg
Michael Abts
Richard Farrell
Pamela Nemecek
Valerie WeakLance Huntley
Rotimi Agbabiaka
Radhika Rao
Peter D'Souza
Marc Andreas Schaub
Kimberly Walker

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

This activity received no commercial support.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html.

CME Privacy Policy

Click here to review the Stanford Center for CME Privacy Policy.

Contact Information

If you are having technical problems (video freezes or is unplayable, can't print your certificate, etc.) you can submit a Help Ticket Request to the OpenEdX Team. If you have questions related to CME credit, requirements (Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation, Attestation) or course content, you can contact the CME Online support team at cmeonline@stanford.edu

Bibliography

High-Quality CPR
Meaney PA, et al. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and outside the hospital: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2013;128:417-35.

Preparing Your Office for Emergencies
Toback, SL. Medical Emergency Preparedness in Office Practice. Am Fam Physician. 2007;75:1679-84.

Syncope
Costantino G. et al. Syncope Risk Stratification Tools vs Clinical Judgment: An Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2014:127;1126.e13-1126e25.

Costantino G, Furlan R. Syncope Risk Stratification in the Emergency Department. ­­­ Cardiol Clin. 2013:31;27-38.

Benditt D, Adkisson WO. Approach to the Patient with Syncope. Cardiol Clin. 2013:31;9-25.

Anaphylaxis
Simons FE, et al. World Allergy Organization Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Anaphylaxis. WAO Journal. 2011:4;413-37.

Chest Pain
O’Gara PT, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013;61:e78-140.

Asthma
Okelo SO, et al. Interventions to Modify Health Care Provider Adherence to Asthma Guidelines: A Systematic Review. Pediatrics. 2013;132:517-34.

Cates CJ, et al. Holding Chambers (Spacers) Versus Nebulisers for Beta-Agonist Treatment of Acute Asthma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013; Sep 13;9.

Seizures
Claassen J, et al. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Status Epilepticus. Neurocrit Care. 2012:Suppl1:S73-8.

Silbergleit R, et al. Intramuscular Versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus. N Engl J Med. 2012;366:591-600.

Communication


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Date: 
Tuesday, May 16, 2017
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Course topic: 

Live Webinar! May 16, 2017 9-10am

Price: Free

STATEMENT OF NEED

This live CME Zika Update Webinar will focus on disease emergence and transmission routes of the Zika virus, emerging data from clinical research, and updated guidelines for Zika-exposed diagnosis and treatment.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • This is a national program, designed for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other healthcare providers practicing in:
    • Family Practice
    • Primary Care
    • Internal Medicine
    • Neurology
    • Pediatrics
    • OB/GYN
    • Infectious Disease

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • At the conclusion of this activity, learners will be able to:
    • Identify the transmission routes of the Zika virus and the reasons for disease emergence
    • Determine appropriate diagnostic testing/work-up and follow-up of Zika exposed neonates
    • Outline the basics of Zika prevention and consider the treatment options

COURSE DIRECTOR

  • Desiree LaBeaud, MD 
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

WEBINAR MODERATOR

  • Charles Prober, MD
    Senior Associate Dean, Medical Education and Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

WEBINAR SPEAKER

  • Desiree LaBeaud, MD
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

 


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Date: 
Monday, April 17, 2017
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Offered by Stanford Continuing Studies.

Fee Applies.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mindset that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings.


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